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What do I need to start bow hunting? What tips are there? And what gear do I need? (I would go bow hunting for deer and hogs).

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  • What do I need to start bow hunting? What tips are there? And what gear do I need? (I would go bow hunting for deer and hogs).

    What do I need to start bow hunting? What tips are there? And what gear do I need? (I would go bow hunting for deer and hogs).

  • #2
    The secret to bowhunting is to have a well tuned bow with an arrow also properly tuned to the bow. Learn to shoot your bow at a distance of 30 yards then take to the woods. Take only broadside shots of animals standing still and not on alert. This is very basic but you will learn as you go. Good luck.

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    • #3
      A archery store can help you determine what gear is best for you and what you want to hunt. Practice is important, some States like New York made you take a proficiency test to get a archery license - I had to years ago but not sure if they still require the test.

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      • #4
        Bow hunting is like a lot of other pursuits, where you can spend a ton of money on all sorts of gear if you want, but you also can get by and succeed with a much smaller shopping list. You need a decent bow, arrows, target points, broadheads and clothing appropriate for where you’ll hunt. You’ll also need some kind of target, for lots of practice as others have noted. You can buy a nice commercially marketed target or make something cheap. I’ve shot a lot of arrows at a paper plate stapled to a couple layers of scrap carpeting hung over a line. Practice, practice, practice. Read about bow hunting and hunting in general in magazines, online, whatever. Wait for a good, close shot.

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        • #5
          first you need a bow. id look at something like a mission ballistic or a Hoyt charger. both are really good bows easy to learn with and forgiving when shot. they'll run you around 500-600 bucks depending on where you get it. tell the bow shop your a beginner and he will set your bow up to fit you and he will also let you shoot in their range until your comfortable enough to shoot at home. every thing you need to know about shooting im sure they will teach you at the bow shop. they'll tell you to get a release, some arrows to fit your draw and your new bow, a quiver of your liking and a peep site. id stay away from a kisser button and just go with the peep site, iv seen new guys try both and it just make them look for the sweet spot when they anchor to much which you'll learn about there as well. once your home keep shooting at 20 yards until its a gimme shot then move back to 30. once you've mastered that you can move back more if you want. before you hunt practice shooting setting down and on your knees and give yourself like a 5 second count to make the shot. only worry about that stuff after your comfortable shooting though, it will make you a better shot if you practice it. once your ready get a good hang on or ladder stand and always wear a safety vest and you will be ready to hunt. good luck and be careful it'll get you addicted and make you crazy. lol. im sure you'll love it.

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          • #6
            Don't get sucked into the "speed game".
            Such rigs are usually harder on the wallet (initially), the shooter (magnify errors) and stress components/accessories faster. Something in the "middle" performance wise will slay all the deer and pigs you want. Then again, you can do that with slow poke gear too (or hot rod).
            A lot of people have to have the latest and greatest, and bows change so much yr to yr that they lose their value pretty fast. Got a buddy with a thick wallet, likes the newest. My hunting partner buys his 2 yr old stuff, at great prices............like new. BUT............they have the same drawlength. Lots of guys charge too much for their used gear and sucker friends, coworkers and or family into buying it............often the fit not even close.
            FWIW I've hunted with like new $15 garage sale recurve, and $1000 custom ones. Well tuned, they all work. Just some are faster, more quiet, quicker..or have colors or design features setting them apart........deer don't care how much you spend. Good stuff isn't cheap, but there are bargains out there. One new compound bow, my local shop sells out of every year.............the PSE Stinger. They also sell a lot of the new Mission stuff that can fit people over a wider range. BTW, this yr I'm hunting with a 30+ yr old recurve. Just about any compound out there looks like a top fuel dragster compared to my rig. I have full confidence in its ability to do the job.

            Comment


            • #7
              You will need a bow and at least six arrows with a field tip and broadhead for each. Inexpensive carbon arrows are fine for starters. You can learn to hunt instinctively without a sight just like the Native Americans did but that will take a LOT of time and practice. For a beginner, I recommend using a compound bow, pin sight, peep sight and release. This type of rig is much easier to learn on and will produce a high level of accuracy with minimum effort. I also recommend a store bought target because these rigs launch arrows at such high speed that you may break arrows with a bale of straw or a makeshift target.


              If you are hunting in the north where trees have broad heavy limbs, you can sit on a limb or craft a simple bow stand and ladder to it with wood. If you live in areas where there are only pine trees or trees that don't have limbs for the first 25 feet from the ground, you will need a bow stand. Climbers are handy if you can't leave a stand in the woods and ladder stands are comfy if you can. Camo is almost a must for archery hunting because the deer are so close, it helps to break up your silhouette. ANY camo works from used military fatigues to $600 fashion designer camo. Finally, you will need a field knife capable of field dressing a deer. This doesn't have to be expensive but it needs to be sharp. Most beginners have their deer processed by a butcher but they aren't really difficult to cut and package yourself once you learn how.

              You are going to want to find a place in the woods where deer trails intersect and place your stand on the downwind side of that. Check prevailing winds for your location. This is where a climber is a little better because you can move it for wind.

              Handy optional equipment includes a bottle of doe in estrus scent and a Primos Can call. You can do more with rattling horns, buck snorts, etc. but you have to know how to use them so I'd wait on those. Novices have a tendency to scare more deer than attract them using these devices. I like to put doe scent on the bottom of my shoes and on drag rags attached to my shoes as I go to my stand. Deer really are attracted to scents and they are relatively easy to use. You can also put up a scent wick in your kill zone. Most deer passing will come nearer to take a sniff.
              Controlling scent is mandatory when you are attempting to get within 10-30 yards of a deer. The most effective technique is to shower with scentless soap and put your field clothes in a garbage bag with pine or cedar boughs and leave them outside the house where they won't be exposed to human scents (like popcorn, bacon, fried eggs, etc.). I leave my outer clothes in a bag until I get to the hunting sight and dress there.
              Like anything else, you have options of whether you buy used or new equipment based on your budget. You certainly don't need the Cadillac of bows but generally the more expensive bows are easier to use, give you greater range and are quieter. Nice but not mandatory. You will generally find used equipment at lower prices and on ebay or at garage sales where you will find the previous owner selling ALL their goodies with the bow at the lowest price saving you a lot for your money.

              I agree with CD2 that "deer don't care how much you spend." It is where you hit them that really counts... not the cost of the equipment you use. You don't need the fanciest equipment on the planet to hunt deer. I started with a recurve and lifted weights and practiced for two months and did fine. Moving to a compound reduced the effort to draw and therefore simplified practice. When I got the compound rigged out with great sights, it became as accurate as my .22 rifle and extended my range.
              Hope this helps you get started. It is one of the most exciting sports on the planet. Best of luck to you and let us know how you do.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post
                You will need a bow and at least six arrows with a field tip and broadhead for each. Inexpensive carbon arrows are fine for starters. You can learn to hunt instinctively without a sight just like the Native Americans did but that will take a LOT of time and practice. For a beginner, I recommend using a compound bow, pin sight, peep sight and release. This type of rig is much easier to learn on and will produce a high level of accuracy with minimum effort. I also recommend a store bought target because these rigs launch arrows at such high speed that you may break arrows with a bale of straw or a makeshift target.


                If you are hunting in the north where trees have broad heavy limbs, you can sit on a limb or craft a simple bow stand and ladder to it with wood. If you live in areas where there are only pine trees or trees that don't have limbs for the first 25 feet from the ground, you will need a bow stand. Climbers are handy if you can't leave a stand in the woods and ladder stands are comfy if you can. Camo is almost a must for archery hunting because the deer are so close, it helps to break up your silhouette. ANY camo works from used military fatigues to $600 fashion designer camo. Finally, you will need a field knife capable of field dressing a deer. This doesn't have to be expensive but it needs to be sharp. Most beginners have their deer processed by a butcher but they aren't really difficult to cut and package yourself once you learn how.

                You are going to want to find a place in the woods where deer trails intersect and place your stand on the downwind side of that. Check prevailing winds for your location. This is where a climber is a little better because you can move it for wind.

                Handy optional equipment includes a bottle of doe in estrus scent and a Primos Can call. You can do more with rattling horns, buck snorts, etc. but you have to know how to use them so I'd wait on those. Novices have a tendency to scare more deer than attract them using these devices. I like to put doe scent on the bottom of my shoes and on drag rags attached to my shoes as I go to my stand. Deer really are attracted to scents and they are relatively easy to use. You can also put up a scent wick in your kill zone. Most deer passing will come nearer to take a sniff.
                Controlling scent is mandatory when you are attempting to get within 10-30 yards of a deer. The most effective technique is to shower with scentless soap and put your field clothes in a garbage bag with pine or cedar boughs and leave them outside the house where they won't be exposed to human scents (like popcorn, bacon, fried eggs, etc.). I leave my outer clothes in a bag until I get to the hunting sight and dress there.
                Like anything else, you have options of whether you buy used or new equipment based on your budget. You certainly don't need the Cadillac of bows but generally the more expensive bows are easier to use, give you greater range and are quieter. Nice but not mandatory. You will generally find used equipment at lower prices and on ebay or at garage sales where you will find the previous owner selling ALL their goodies with the bow at the lowest price saving you a lot for your money.

                I agree with CD2 that "deer don't care how much you spend." It is where you hit them that really counts... not the cost of the equipment you use. You don't need the fanciest equipment on the planet to hunt deer. I started with a recurve and lifted weights and practiced for two months and did fine. Moving to a compound reduced the effort to draw and therefore simplified practice. When I got the compound rigged out with great sights, it became as accurate as my .22 rifle and extended my range.
                Hope this helps you get started. It is one of the most exciting sports on the planet. Best of luck to you and let us know how you do.
                Thank you for all of the information.

                Comment


                • #9
                  If one can tune/shoot for "3 under" fingers release they learning curve for "bare bow" can be rather short (notice I said "can tune"........not all bows can be, esp the newer stuff of short axle to axle and higher letoff). Older gear can be quite doable.

                  FWIW my weighted carbons for my recurve have me aiming 4" low at 20yards with a high anchor. Same sight picture with a lower 2nd anchor has me nailing the bull at 30 yards.

                  Pretty simple.

                  Of course I'm shooting off a velcro chunk spaced for quill clearance, on a recurve cut past center. My carbons are weighted for proper spine and paper tune shows 'em pretty darn sweet. So my field tips and broadheads hit the same.

                  I shot "split finger" and lower anchors for years (compound and recurve), and did well, but it took a lot more practice. Coming back from an injury I didn't have time last yr to get into the groove so changed some stuff. Worked perfectly.

                  Do agree, that sights and release offer a fast learning curve, and the let off and other aspects of compounds can be very nice.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CD2 View Post
                    If one can tune/shoot for "3 under" fingers release they learning curve for "bare bow" can be rather short (notice I said "can tune"........not all bows can be, esp the newer stuff of short axle to axle and higher letoff). Older gear can be quite doable.

                    FWIW my weighted carbons for my recurve have me aiming 4" low at 20yards with a high anchor. Same sight picture with a lower 2nd anchor has me nailing the bull at 30 yards.

                    Pretty simple.

                    Of course I'm shooting off a velcro chunk spaced for quill clearance, on a recurve cut past center. My carbons are weighted for proper spine and paper tune shows 'em pretty darn sweet. So my field tips and broadheads hit the same.

                    I shot "split finger" and lower anchors for years (compound and recurve), and did well, but it took a lot more practice. Coming back from an injury I didn't have time last yr to get into the groove so changed some stuff. Worked perfectly.

                    Do agree, that sights and release offer a fast learning curve, and the let off and other aspects of compounds can be very nice.
                    WuzzBowhunting can be done with a variety of gear. Back in the day compounds and fingers was cool, effective (and fun). Sadly, many a bowhunter or archer today has never shot without a release. While I prefer recurves these days (functional art) that doesn't mean I don't know how to tune or use the other stuff. My Mathews with HHA sight, Ripcord rest and Fletchunter release was a nice shooter. I probably should have kept it, and mod/changed it to Hoyt cam and a Halfs (because the wall on the single cam was just a bit soft). The Torqueless grip was a major improvement over the factory standard.
                    I did slap a Viper front sight on the HHA for a horizontal pin and yanked the level, the older Ripcord had the prongs shortened and when it got noisy I changed out the rubber on the inside to some much better stuff we had at work. Not sure if Remoil or what caused that to harden, but it spend a few yrs on my Hoyt Protec before going to the Mathews. Papertune on both those rigs showed perfect. No probs with my fixed blade heads. Both of them 72#.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by CD2 View Post
                      If one can tune/shoot for "3 under" fingers release they learning curve for "bare bow" can be rather short (notice I said "can tune"........not all bows can be, esp the newer stuff of short axle to axle and higher letoff). Older gear can be quite doable.

                      FWIW my weighted carbons for my recurve have me aiming 4" low at 20yards with a high anchor. Same sight picture with a lower 2nd anchor has me nailing the bull at 30 yards.

                      Pretty simple.

                      Of course I'm shooting off a velcro chunk spaced for quill clearance, on a recurve cut past center. My carbons are weighted for proper spine and paper tune shows 'em pretty darn sweet. So my field tips and broadheads hit the same.

                      I shot "split finger" and lower anchors for years (compound and recurve), and did well, but it took a lot more practice. Coming back from an injury I didn't have time last yr to get into the groove so changed some stuff. Worked perfectly.

                      Do agree, that sights and release offer a fast learning curve, and the let off and other aspects of compounds can be very nice.
                      FWIW there are still some diehard fingers shooters who want some letoff (those guys probably keeping the used Oneida prices up). The Black Eagle and Black Eagle 2's are commanding a decent sum. Dunno who has made any compound for 3 fingers shooting since the Hoyt/Reflex Caribou.
                      But there are tons of old rigs of 40" or more A2A for sale. Not all that long ago I was shooting a used but like new PSE Mach 5 and a High Country Sniper for bowfishing. Got 'em cheap and they were in excellent shape. Would have been good Bambi slayers if so equipped.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Whatever gear you choose, pick a small aiming point in practice, and hunting. You don't shoot "at" an animal. Your aim is for a specific spot on that critter. The spot does however change, depending on distance, angle, elevation. Quite a few people think 2D (even when they own and practice with a 3D deer target- since the scoring rings are fixed).

                        The little deer models were pretty good back in the day, showing folks what was what (International Bowhunter Education Program).
                        Regular Hunter's Ed classes cover the basics, but I think a IBEP or similar class can be of more benefit......if just to do the fake bloodtrail in the woods (if they still do that).

                        FWIW I cringe when I see old hats and beginners, who shoot at bare paper plates. Put a 1" black dot on it. And kill that dot.

                        A lack of focus in practice is gonna be worse in the field. Yeah yeah, I know some folks do it and are successful. Not a dang one of those types ever beat me indoors, or on a 3D range.

                        Put in the work, don't be a slob.....and always strive to be a better shot. There are better ways of practicing.

                        Couple of hints on practicing.....don't shoot on an empty stomach.
                        If things are bad, you get frustrated.......stop for the day.
                        If you're fatigued, stop. You'll learn bad habits. There can be some benefit to pushing yourself to the limit, but I wouldn't recommend that to somebody who doesn't have proper form ingrained.

                        I found over the years that shooting after work was tougher. I couldn't focus as good as I wanted. Weekends?, ... laser beaming them in there. So.........don't be too hard on yourself if practice sessions have setbacks or flat out suck. Just be honest about your efforts, and things should be fun overall and have a trend of improvement.

                        Comment

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