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I am wondering if it would be a good idea to buy some 80lb limbs for my PSE Rally i am 14 years old,5ft8,and 140 lbs i draw my 7

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  • I am wondering if it would be a good idea to buy some 80lb limbs for my PSE Rally i am 14 years old,5ft8,and 140 lbs i draw my 7

    I am wondering if it would be a good idea to buy some 80lb limbs for my PSE Rally i am 14 years old,5ft8,and 140 lbs i draw my 70lb bow extremely easily...good idea or bad?

  • #2
    I'm not really an archery expert, but I'd say 70 lbs is more than good enough, add more weight, even if you can handle it, and you might lose accuracy.

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    • #3
      For deer i'd say that's be silly. If you're bowhunting Elk, moose or bear, maybe, but 70# is pretty stout.

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      • #4
        The best way to find out is to try it.

        All you've got to lose is some money.

        Ah hadda 75 lb traditional longbow and Ah could pull it easily until Ah started gittin old...

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        • #5
          Overall, I think it is not a good idea. Could you get more draw weight from your existing bow? Change arrows and broadheads? You are only 14 years old and are growing and this bow will not fit you for long without updates. The equipment today is much more efficient than years past and lessens the need for heavy draw bows. I would change equipment as you grow out of yours to better technology. Years ago, I competed with a bow with a 108# draw weight in the International Bow hunting Organization, doing very well. The next year, IBO set a limit of 80# for its competition(The wimps were all crying.) I needed to change equipment and did even better the next year. My point is that archery industry is in rapid change the last two decades, and that with technology, you now longer need the heavy draw weights. (Point of interest: In the Middle Ages, the long bow had a draw weight of more than 150#, but I am sure they would have traded it for the modern compound bow)

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          • #6
            Agreed with most on here. There is absolutely no need to increase your weight. I keep my bow at 62#. I know I could pull a heck of a lot more weight but it isn't needed.

            When I was 11 I got my first bow. It was an old Fred Bear Whitetail and the draw weight was set at 39#. I killed a few deer with it shooting 2117 arrow shafts and muzzy broadheads. Always found my deer and it killed fine. Farthest shot was 35 yards when I was 13. My pins were set up for 10, 20, and 30 yards. Heck I didn't have a peep sight, a kisser button, and I didn't shoot with a release. Just used fingers.

            Technology has come a long way, but with archery certain things remain and will always remain the same. Learn and apply the fundamentals of archery marksmanship. Practice whenever you can. And when a deer presents itself keep breathing, aim small, and put the arrow where it needs to go.

            Enjoy your season and don't waste your money on new limbs. Waste it on new equipment that is somehow supposed to bring in all the deer.

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            • #7
              I agree with most here that you don't need 80# draw weight for deer. Your 70# has plenty of speed and penetration. Additional draw weight could negatively affect you by making it more difficult to maintain a full draw for several minutes if necessary. At times you may have to draw your bow when the deer is passing a tree or looking the other way.

              You will find that on occasion you may have to hold your bow at full draw for several minutes before the deer presents you with a shot. A heavier draw weight can make it tough to do this. Most of us can draw an 80# bow once a year. However, most of us would have a tough time holding one at full draw for three minutes. I have waited that long on several occasions to get a good shot and avoid spooking close game.

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              • #8
                as some one who has been shooting around 80 pounds since i was about your size (i currently shoot 81 pounds) i would strongly discourage you from doing so. Wait until you are a little older and you muscles have fully developed around your shoulders. In a few years your shoulder muscles and ligaments will be much more able to take the strain. I am currently in my 20's and am having aches and pains like a 40 year old. your best bet is to upgrade to a whole new bow if you just have to. not only will it help save our shoulders but it will also be way more cost effective. New limbs will probably run you 100-150, you should also probably get a new string and cables another 90-160 depending on what strings you get. (also i don't think that you can even get the rally in 80 pound limbs) when you add all that up you are half way to a much nicer bow that can come from the factory at 80 lbs and you can keep it in the low 70's until your shoulders are better able to handle the weight.You will pick up so much with a newer bow that has parallel limbs, better cambs and a better draw cycle. But at 14 you have a lot of growing to do so you will likely grow out of any high end bow you buy now in only a few year. In my opinion keep hunting with what you have it will grow with you until you are fully grown. 70 pounds will kill anything in north america if you put the arrow in the right place.I agree with dakota work on the time that you can hold the bow back steady. i held for over 2 min on my elk 2 years ago and with my adrenaline pumping and my nerves through the roof i can honestly say it was the toughest shot in my life despite not being the farthest shot i have ever take, or the most wind I have ever hunted in.

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                • #9
                  Sit down "Indian style" with thick clothes on. Let yourself get good and cold and stiff. If you can't draw your bow quickly and smoothly while keeping it level, still, and on target, you're pulling too much weight.

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                  • #10
                    I would not do it. You would just be spending money. 70 is plenty for deer hunting. Keep your accuracy and keep it easy on yourself.

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                    • #11
                      As far as I know, deer aren't covered with body armor. Why put yourself at risk for serious injury (torn tendons/ligaments/muscles etc) when it isn't needed?

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