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  • MattM37
    replied
    Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
    "... "Garlic out the wahzoo," that's my kind of recipe measurement! ..."

    Have you ever grown garlic?
    Talk about awesome.
    Garlic planting season in the south (TX, OK) is October.

    We had a flower bed on the north side of the house. I shoved garlic cloves into the soft soil.
    In no time, small, green, onion looking sprouts came up.
    I needed garlic for beans one day, so pulled up 2, slipped the mushy bulb off the end, washed them, chopped them up, green top and all and threw them in the pot.
    The garlic flavor was awesome! ....so next time I put 3 in. WOW! ...
    so next time....yep, I put 4 in!!
    ALL YOU COULD TASTE WAS GARLIC!!!!! LOL!

    If I could figure out how to make garlic ice cream, I'd try it!
    The way garlic softens up when it's roasted, I bet it would blend nicely into vanilla ice cream. I've heard of people doing that with roasted hot peppers. Probably it could be slow-roasted to a point of softness that you wouldn't even need the blender, you could just stir it in with a whisk or even a spoon.

    Ever see the movie "Goodfellas"? The old Italian crime boss used a razor blade to slice garlic so thin, it would melt in a pan of hot olive oil.
    Imagine pan-frying some backstrap medallions in that!

    I have never grown garlic. We do have some form of wild garlic growing in this region, along with the wild leeks or ramps I dig up in the spring, but I've never looked for it.
    Last edited by MattM37; 12-02-2021, 01:58 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
    Our garlic got away from us this summer and the scapes went to seed. When I dug the garlic I saved the seeds and my wife planted them along with the cloves a few weeks ago. She looked online and the seed should turn into a solid like bulb that you can use or replant next year that will turn into a typical garlic bulb. We’re curious how they’ll turn out.


    We don’t grow enough to pickle outright but add some cloves in with our dill pickles. My daughter and I both like picking them out when the jar gets opened.
    I can feel my jaw muscles torquing up now! Man those things are G-U-D "good"!

    Leave a comment:


  • fitch270
    replied
    Our garlic got away from us this summer and the scapes went to seed. When I dug the garlic I saved the seeds and my wife planted them along with the cloves a few weeks ago. She looked online and the seed should turn into a solid like bulb that you can use or replant next year that will turn into a typical garlic bulb. We’re curious how they’ll turn out.


    We don’t grow enough to pickle outright but add some cloves in with our dill pickles. My daughter and I both like picking them out when the jar gets opened.

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    "... "Garlic out the wahzoo," that's my kind of recipe measurement! ..."

    Have you ever grown garlic?
    Talk about awesome.
    Garlic planting season in the south (TX, OK) is October.

    We had a flower bed on the north side of the house. I shoved garlic cloves into the soft soil.
    In no time, small, green, onion looking sprouts came up.
    I needed garlic for beans one day, so pulled up 2, slipped the mushy bulb off the end, washed them, chopped them up, green top and all and threw them in the pot.
    The garlic flavor was awesome! ....so next time I put 3 in. WOW! ...
    so next time....yep, I put 4 in!!
    ALL YOU COULD TASTE WAS GARLIC!!!!! LOL!

    If I could figure out how to make garlic ice cream, I'd try it!

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by MattM37 View Post

    That sounds really good.

    I've done different things with turkeys. I know one time I was saying I don't roast them whole very often (for the reasons in my last post), but cut up the separate parts and do them differently. Pan-fried cutlets of breast meat, thighs roasted or braised, drumsticks braised a good long time in the Crock Pot.

    "Garlic out the wahzoo," that's my kind of recipe measurement!
    We usually roast first 2/3 of time in a covered pan then open for the last part. Cover the breast with aluminum foil and keep basting. Another oven has the fan in it and that helps the hot spots from drying things out.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattM37
    replied
    Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post

    I'm not sure, but I think it was you that talked about removing a turkey breast whole?

    I remove the breast whole and separate the legs and thighs.
    I use the big, deep, oval foil pans and arrange breast and thighs together in the pan.
    Pepper, a touch of rubbed sage and at least one onion, if not 2, garlic out the wahzoo.
    Then two quarts of chicken stock and cover with 2 to 3 layers of foil, making sure it's (the tin foil!) sealed around the top of the pan.
    In the oven at 350° for an hour. Reduce to 250° and cooked for 3 to 4 more hours.
    Comes out tender and juicy!
    That sounds really good.

    I've done different things with turkeys. I know one time I was saying I don't roast them whole very often (for the reasons in my last post), but cut up the separate parts and do them differently. Pan-fried cutlets of breast meat, thighs roasted or braised, drumsticks braised a good long time in the Crock Pot.

    "Garlic out the wahzoo," that's my kind of recipe measurement!

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    [QUOTE=FirstBubba;n786445]

    I'm not sure, but I think it was you that talked about removing a turkey breast whole?

    I remove the breast whole and separate the legs and thighs.
    I use the big, deep, oval foil pans and arrange breast and thighs together in the pan.
    Pepper, a touch of rubbed sage and at least one onion, if not 2, garlic out the wahzoo.
    Then two quarts of chicken stock and cover with 2 to 3 layers of foil, making sure it's (the tin foil!) sealed around the top of the pan.
    In the oven at 350° for an hour. Reduce to 250° and cooked for 3 to 4 more hours.
    Comes out tender and juicy!

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
    Depending on your oven and how the bird is positioned or prepped, you could have breast meat fully cooked and heading for dry, while your dark meat hasn't even reached safe temperature yet. Usually the disparity isn't that extreme, but that's always been the real trick with a whole bird, fully cooking it all without letting the breast meat cook too much. Dark meat, on the other hand, can stand a little overcooking and not get terribly dry.

    No secret to keeping meat moist: Just don't overcook it.

    There's also brining. Once I learned how to do that properly, it changed everything. S ome cooks think brining is simply the same as marinating, but it's not. Brining's main purpose is filling the meat up with moisture; extra flavorings may or may not be part of the picture. In a proper 24-hour brine soak, the salt pulls the moisture out of meat, but then over time, helps reabsorption of the moisture back into the meat. Something to do with the water and protein molecules, if I remember my Alton Brown "Good Eats" correctly.
    I'm not sure, but I think it was you that talked about removing a turkey breast whole?

    I remove the breast whole and separate the legs and thighs.
    I use the big, deep, oval foil pans and arrange breast and thighs together in the pan.
    Pepper, a touch of rubbed sage and at least one onion, if not 2, garlic out the wahzoo.
    Then two quarts of chicken stock and cover with 2 to 3 layers of foil, making sure it's (the tin foil!) sealed around the top of the pan.
    In the oven at 350° for an hour. Reduce to 250° and cooked for 3 to 4 more hours.
    Comes out tender and juicy!

    Leave a comment:


  • MattM37
    replied
    Depending on your oven and how the bird is positioned or prepped, you could have breast meat fully cooked and heading for dry, while your dark meat hasn't even reached safe temperature yet. Usually the disparity isn't that extreme, but that's always been the real trick with a whole bird, fully cooking it all without letting the breast meat cook too much. Dark meat, on the other hand, can stand a little overcooking and not get terribly dry.

    No secret to keeping meat moist: Just don't overcook it.

    There's also brining. Once I learned how to do that properly, it changed everything. S ome cooks think brining is simply the same as marinating, but it's not. Brining's main purpose is filling the meat up with moisture; extra flavorings may or may not be part of the picture. In a proper 24-hour brine soak, the salt pulls the moisture out of meat, but then over time, helps reabsorption of the moisture back into the meat. Something to do with the water and protein molecules, if I remember my Alton Brown "Good Eats" correctly.

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    jimbo, did you ever mould your own bullets? I've moulded muzzle loader bullets, pistol bullets, sinkers and made my own shot.
    Melting lead, not only the lead vapor but a single drop of water in your lead pot can lead to an explosive reaction.
    Mitch had a drop of sweat fall off his nose into his lead pot. His shop looked like somebody shot it with a shotgun. Fortunately, he was untouched.
    Danny wasn't so lucky. He was making muzzle loader bullets. He washed his dipper (a spoon), dried it and stuck it in his lead pot. It wasn't dry! He spent several hours at the hospital having the lead splatter dug out of his chest, face and stomach!
    Not only that, his wife made him redo her kitchen! LOL!

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
    Roast Turkey for us. Tried this year to take the breast bone out - came out good.

    I learned why deep fryers are so dangerous. The bird hangs from a hook - when the meat cooks, it weakens, the bird falls into the oil and splashes the burner that then catches fire.
    Close, but no cigar.
    1) people stupidly put too much oil in the fryer and the oil overflows onto the burner
    2) most commonly, when the moisture (or ice) in/on the turkey hits the hot oil, it immediately turns to steam in an explosive reaction*
    3) idiots "drop" the bird into the oil.

    In 99% of cases, when the oil hits the burner and flame flares up, the human reaction is to "drop" the bird and move away from the flame. That just makes a bad situation worse.

    "Frying" turkeys has burned many homes.

    * - that's why bacon and cheap hamburger meat pop and sizzle. You're cooking the water out of it.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Roast Turkey for us. Tried this year to take the breast bone out - came out good.

    I learned why deep fryers are so dangerous. The bird hangs from a hook - when the meat cooks, it weakens, the bird falls into the oil and splashes the burner that then catches fire.
    Last edited by jhjimbo; 11-27-2021, 10:28 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    I had Thanksgiving dinner at a neighbors house, she prepared a smoked turkey. It was okay, but had a definite smoked ham taste and kind of negated the more preferred ‘turkey’ flavor which was the intended purpose to begin with. Oh, well, it filled me up, so I guess.......so what ! Is smoked turkey preferred by some of you?

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    I like a Butterball roasted in a cooking bag to keep it moist. However, I have had some delicious wild turkey too, depending on how it is cooked.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    The cooking process was altered some this year. The breast bone was removed from the bird and the meat was almost flat. Cooked thoroughly and I think a time saving. Meat was excellent.

    Leave a comment:

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