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  • #46
    Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
    Springerman, I do read through your posts ... enough to suspect that overall, and relatively speaking, there is not nearly the disparity between us that you make out. Two flushing springers in 24 years? I'm on my seventh hunting dog with both pointers and flushers in the mix. I have been shooting at the club for five years now. I shoot at least twenty flats of ammo a year ... at clay targets. Plus a couple more in the field at wild birds. More than five thousand rounds per year. That's twenty-five thousand rounds since joining the club. I have hunted in many states, provinces, and foreign countries. And I've been doing it since 1964. Yet, you talk down to me like I'm some kind of novice who doesn't have a clue. Why? Because you're a hunters ed teacher and you hang with Phil B? I am an educated and experienced REAL teacher and coach. Perhaps I can give you a piece of important advice gleaned from that experience and education: "positive reinforcement" is a very effective teaching tool. The best teaching tool.

    Now, if you had any experience hunting anything but the groomed cornfields of Iowa you would understand that when working the lee side of canyon wall for birds that are staying out of the wind, changing footing to meet your exhalted "move, mount, and shoot" is not applicable ... not safely anyway. But I can still get a shot off safely without moving my feet. It's a difficult shot but I make them. Sometimes. Because I have experience.

    And really, one time out shooting geese and you're in a position to tell me what I'm doing wrong?

    Some of my extensive experiences resulted in undesirable outcomes, and some may seem careless in hindsight. I make no apologies. It is what I am. I cleared MY OWN path in life. Others can make their own choice whether to follow. But it's not a choice if they aren't informed. More perspectives will yield life choices that are genuinely unique. One does not have to swim against the current to prove originality. But he should at least know there is another direction.
    Honk:
    Gosh I was done laughing from your posts on the new gun blog and now I have started again !!
    OK, calmed down some now 😂
    Yes, 2 dogs hunted over a 24 year span. Gabe, son of Andy my first springer. Born in January so he hunted with his father that fall and two more after that. He hunted until the January he turned 11 and then the arthritis finally took away hunting mobility. He died at age 14, so a good retirement.
    The December before Gabe turned 11 Clem was born from a different kennel. As it was very apparent Clem would be "the dog" in his first fall training was even more brisk. His first hunt he was 5 days shy of 10 months, a grouse hunt in Wisconsin and we actually bagged one.
    A good description of Clem would have been the Star Wars analogy of "the force is strong in this one Master Yoda"
    He always seemed in tune with where to hunt, range he needed to be at. He was basically a clone of Gabe but with a little more splash and was an excellent retriever. Not that Gabe couldn't retrieve he just did it enough to make sure birds were not lost.
    Anyway Clem hunted until a month after his 14th birthday so combine the two hunting spans and you get 24 years.....
    Pete came along when Clem was 11 but I never hunted them together. Clem "was" the alpha dog and would have never tolerated him in the same field. Clem died at 15 1/2, funny that Pete actually moped around for better than a month after he passed.
    Here is a news flash for you, groomed corn fields don't have any pheasants !! No fence rows or ones that are there don't have any type of brushy/shrub cover for birds. Same with draws or waterways. Without some decent CRP field there are sections with zero ( or darn few ) pheasants......
    Ethanol needs have made some parts of the state nearly void of birds !
    I have no problem with using positive reinforcement in a training/teaching environment. They wouldn't keep me on as a hunter ed instructor if I wasn't. However with extensive retail experience of dealing with folks and asking questions to get info to help them it becomes apparent to me that when pressed with a question about a previous statement your answer somehow changes. I have noted this in previous discussions...... What should I assume from your answers that don't line up ?
    So now I have to treat you with kid gloves in discussions just like Bubba..... Wow are you guys like distant cousins? 😋

    Another news flash you are nit the only "experienced" goose hunter out there ?
    The guys I know here bag well over a couple hundred geese
    ( as a group ) every fall. They introduce lots of new and inexperienced folks to goose hunting so the set ups are for close shots for a higher success rate. Most shots are taken at less than 35 yards so a wounded bird can still be bagged without the Hail Mary shots. That is an excellent ethical perspective!
    Yes some birds will get hit and fly away, they just make a concentrated effort for that not to happen.
    I find that perspective very appealing as longer shots (45 plus yards) are discouraged.
    Their motto is get them close and kill them dead with first shot.
    Yes, I get to hang out with Phil, I wish more folks here had the same opportunity ! Nice guy, not perfect just like everyone else here. We don't agree on everything either but still somehow manage to be friends 👍
    When I say move your feet it may only be a matter of a few inches back, forward, sideways or simply raising up on the ball of your foot so it can pivot better. Figured with your "experience" you could figure that out.....
    If you want to down the safety path I am curious what you finally decided to do with your gun so when a dog steps on the trigger it won't go off while you are napping in the field ?
    So you shoot 5000 rounds at clays a year.....unfortunately I don't have 3 or 4 million in Canadian banks, my budget is just a little tighter than yours.
    About 1500 - 2000 for me, most are dedicated practice for bird hunting. Pass on the "stupid" targets meant for the serious sporting shooters.
    As well like to attend shoots in other places, money spent on travel means less for shooting. Nice to meet new folks in person, converse and get to know them face to face.
    Can even be done while practicing social distancing 😀
    Now starting to laugh again.....must stop 😏

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by springerman3 View Post

      Honk:
      Gosh I was done laughing from your posts on the new gun blog and now I have started again !!
      My shells don't cost me millions. Only $70-$75 Canadian ($53 US) per flat (10 boxes of 25 shells each per flat). So just over US $1K/year. Plus $100-$150 more for field ammo. My dogs are undoubtedly the biggest expense. About $4K for Opal's vet bills last year and more than $15K for Pearl's five years ago. Over $1K last year for Ellie's various hunting season injuries and her summertime pancreatitis episode. I don't spend a lot of money on safe queens, fancy hunting clothes, gun carts, or electronics. Experiences mean more to me than stuff.

      Sure, you go ahead and try shuffling your feet while standing on the side of a coulee. You may find yourself falling on your butt with a gun in firing mode. Or tumbling to the bottom of the ravine with it. But I know you're not dumb enough to try something like that. You just don't know it. Because you don't have enough experience in those situations. But it doesn't stop you from expounding on the best way to handle them ... which is actually the worst way of handling them. Take the awkward crossbody shot. That's okay. Not a great shot but safe enough as long as your feet remain solidly on the ground. I take those shots a dozen times or more a year ... and probably make half of them. What makes downhill shooting from a ravine wall even more difficult is it is something no range situation emulates. Not that I've seen anyway. But perhaps an interesting idea for a clays station. Shoot from a tower at targets thrown downward.

      Comment


      • #48
        Meanwhile, back at the ranch.......

        Not too much happened this weekend, the girl and I split up from the boy to try and cover more of the same area. Both days we had a hen come in early and had birds gobbling down the line on the neighbors. Saturday the hen came in to my calls then worked down past the boy and joined up with the toms. Was game over after that. Came down for breakfast and then headed back up for the last of the morning. Birds answered but were still over the line. This morning the hen came down to the boy but turned back up. We had early gobbles from the roost but even farther down the line. Totally quiet late morning.

        We still have two weekends and Memorial Day that I can get out plus the boy will be going up during the week. We've talked about it and don't want to take one by ambush.


        One very nice surprise has been the amount of songbird activity this year. On the calmer mornings the woods have been alive with music. So far we've spotted three different birds I'm not familiar with. I'm no bird ententhusiast but it's good to see something other than chickadees and robins out.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
          Meanwhile, back at the ranch.......

          Not too much happened this weekend, the girl and I split up from the boy to try and cover more of the same area. Both days we had a hen come in early and had birds gobbling down the line on the neighbors. Saturday the hen came in to my calls then worked down past the boy and joined up with the toms. Was game over after that. Came down for breakfast and then headed back up for the last of the morning. Birds answered but were still over the line. This morning the hen came down to the boy but turned back up. We had early gobbles from the roost but even farther down the line. Totally quiet late morning.

          We still have two weekends and Memorial Day that I can get out plus the boy will be going up during the week. We've talked about it and don't want to take one by ambush.


          One very nice surprise has been the amount of songbird activity this year. On the calmer mornings the woods have been alive with music. So far we've spotted three different birds I'm not familiar with. I'm no bird ententhusiast but it's good to see something other than chickadees and robins out.
          So do you think this has been pretty much a normal spring turkey season?

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post

            So do you think this has been pretty much a normal spring turkey season?
            Overall, yeah I’d say so, but there’s a couple things that have been unique about it.

            The first is how often we’ve been up. My daughter has been taking the challenge pretty seriously and hasn’t passed an opportunity to go. Hitting the bird the first morning may factor in, I’m sure part of her is looking for redemption. The boy has also put quite a few hours in on his own, something that wouldn’t have been possible without the current situation.

            Our turkey hunting is probably the most laid back pursuit we do. Being able to walk out the door and be sitting in 20 minutes also means being able to take a break back at the house and go back up. If we aren’t getting reactions we don’t have to wait it out. If we are then we’ll work them until they commit or quit. It’s really about the interaction. I get a kick just out of messing with hens even. Cool thing about that is it often draws attention from otherwise disinterested toms.

            Another thing that stands out is how consistent this group of birds has been hanging around. Very few times have we had no reaction at all. Some years it will be completely quiet one weekend then birds everywhere the next. What’s strange is how noncommittal they’ve been. Even the first morning they didn’t come in hard, it was more like they were checking out the commotion between the hens and myself. There were a bunch of hens around early on in the season, probably not a lot of competition going on. I think this trio has run off the other toms that were around before.

            I had a year somewhat like that 8 or so seasons back. I killed my biggest bird the Saturday of Memorial Day weekend. Worked him three times that morning before finally getting into a position to take him. It had been a very slow season, when I measured his spurs at 1 1/4” I realized he owned the hill that year.

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
              Meanwhile, back at the ranch.......

              Not too much happened this weekend, the girl and I split up from the boy to try and cover more of the same area. Both days we had a hen come in early and had birds gobbling down the line on the neighbors. Saturday the hen came in to my calls then worked down past the boy and joined up with the toms. Was game over after that. Came down for breakfast and then headed back up for the last of the morning. Birds answered but were still over the line. This morning the hen came down to the boy but turned back up. We had early gobbles from the roost but even farther down the line. Totally quiet late morning.

              We still have two weekends and Memorial Day that I can get out plus the boy will be going up during the week. We've talked about it and don't want to take one by ambush.


              One very nice surprise has been the amount of songbird activity this year. On the calmer mornings the woods have been alive with music. So far we've spotted three different birds I'm not familiar with. I'm no bird ententhusiast but it's good to see something other than chickadees and robins out.
              Any chance you were able to take photos of those birds ?
              I usually have an extra bird book back in the truck so I can look them up.
              My thought would be some type of warbler​​​​​ considering your location and time of year.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by springerman3 View Post

                Any chance you were able to take photos of those birds ?
                I usually have an extra bird book back in the truck so I can look them up.
                My thought would be some type of warbler​​​​​ considering your location and time of year.
                We tried with one but it was pretty early and it wouldn’t sit on one branch long enough. That one had the basic colors of a Baltimore Oriole but was shaped more like a Jay and about the size of a Robin.
                The other two were Chickadee sized but sleeker looking. One was brilliant darker blue and black, the other a brilliant orange and black. Guessing all three were males.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post

                  My shells don't cost me millions. Only $70-$75 Canadian ($53 US) per flat (10 boxes of 25 shells each per flat). So just over US $1K/year. Plus $100-$150 more for field ammo. My dogs are undoubtedly the biggest expense. About $4K for Opal's vet bills last year and more than $15K for Pearl's five years ago. Over $1K last year for Ellie's various hunting season injuries and her summertime pancreatitis episode. I don't spend a lot of money on safe queens, fancy hunting clothes, gun carts, or electronics. Experiences mean more to me than stuff.

                  Sure, you go ahead and try shuffling your feet while standing on the side of a coulee. You may find yourself falling on your butt with a gun in firing mode. Or tumbling to the bottom of the ravine with it. But I know you're not dumb enough to try something like that. You just don't know it. Because you don't have enough experience in those situations. But it doesn't stop you from expounding on the best way to handle them ... which is actually the worst way of handling them. Take the awkward crossbody shot. That's okay. Not a great shot but safe enough as long as your feet remain solidly on the ground. I take those shots a dozen times or more a year ... and probably make half of them. What makes downhill shooting from a ravine wall even more difficult is it is something no range situation emulates. Not that I've seen anyway. But perhaps an interesting idea for a clays station. Shoot from a tower at targets thrown downward.
                  Honk:
                  Another news flash, Iowa is not flat ! Just ask the 10,000 plus bikers that ride on RAGBRAI every year.
                  I will note you have not answered my question about what you do with your gun while napping in the field ?
                  I have had plenty of off balance opportunities to shoot at birds, I usually have already decided what shot I will take taking safety into consideration. That is the true experience gives us, the ability to make good decisions !
                  Very clear you have never shot at a grouse flushing out of a tree, they almost always fly downward before leveling off....oh that's right, in Canada folks just walk along a trail and shoot them out of the trees with a .22 !

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by CD2 View Post
                    Back home already. Grrrrrrrrrrr.

                    Learned three things today:

                    #1.......my big camo rubber boots are fine for keeping me dry. They aint bad in the deer woods going to/from stand. But they are big/heavy and noisy, not stealthy enough for turkey hunting.
                    With a bum back I can't move as smooth as I used to. These things make me more clumsy.

                    Need to buy waterproof lightweight hikers. Not the best for tick avoidance, but gotta be easier in mobility.

                    Item #2 I learned............camo over jeans sucks, also hinders mobility. If ya gotta hunker or crawl, cannot impede legs as that aggravates back.

                    Item #3 learned.........getting old sucks. What worked before now doesn't.
                    Time to buy an optic for a turkey gun.
                    CD2, I can relate to what you're going through and at 61 am only a few years older. My back is fine but I'm carrying extra weight and the damn wheezing in my lungs was still there as I went up hills Saturday afternoon. My guess is the illness I had late February was COVID-19 and I've got some lung damage... that's just great.

                    I was hunting pigs with the temps in the upper 80's, wearing a small pack and carrying a suppressed AR. To battle the heat, I wore a short-sleved synthetic shirt in Mossy Oak Breakup Country that wicks moisture, synthetic long-legged briefs also designed to get moisture away from skin, and cotton 6-pocket pants (Mossy Oak).

                    On my feet were lightweight Danner Boots I've used for 11 years. They're lined with Gore-Tex and thus were waterproof for some of the shallow water/mud I had to move through in the creek bottom. These are camo and are 6-inch height with a thin enough sole for feeling sticks while placing my feet when stalking. Unfortunately, they've been discontinued. The 8-inch Pronghorn is a great hunting boot even with the extra height. If you want something shorter, their Sharptail comes in a 4.5 inch height which is more like a light hiker.

                    I had a 40-ounce stainless water bottle so stayed well hydrated for the 3 hours I was kicking about. Also, I was covered in Deet to keep the mosquitos away and perhaps keep the ticks at bay. However, PigHuntress found three ticks on my back when I got home that evening.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by springerman3 View Post

                      Honk: ...
                      I have had plenty of off balance opportunities to shoot at birds, I usually have already decided what shot I will take taking safety into consideration. That is the true experience gives us, the ability to make good decisions !
                      Very clear you have never shot at a grouse flushing out of a tree, they almost always fly downward before leveling off....oh that's right, in Canada folks just walk along a trail and shoot them out of the trees with a .22 !
                      This just gets sillier. You always have foot placement planned out in your head before a bird gets up, even though you hunt behind flushing dogs that push up birds as soon as they find them. Do you know how ridiculous that sounds to someone who really does have experience bird hunting? If my pointers have a bird locked down and I'm close, I will usually approach with drop-step, left foot first. But that's because they're on point. But behind flushers we have to keep up with the dogs. They're not going to wait if they find a bird. When hunting over flushers we obviously don't have the luxury of thinking about where our feet will be positioned when in hot pursuit, especially if struggling to maintain footing on the sides of a coulee or draw. Focus is on the what the dogs are doing and keeping up with them.

                      Yes, I have shot lots of grouse pushed out of trees and off the ground with a shotgun. Some of my best duck hunting spots when I was growing up had plenty of grouse in the nearby woods. Probably shot most of my grouse with Dad's K22 pistol when elk hunting. It fit in my backpack, a shotgun wouldn't. More importantly, a .22 long makes hardly any noise but a shotgun retort can be heard for miles. When hunting big game it's best not to advertise your presence.

                      Obviously shooting a grouse overhead out of a tree is not comparable to shooting a pheasant flushed in a coulee below and across the body. For the tree shot the gun barrel is raised as the gun is raised to meet the bird. Motion is all in the same general direction - upwards. For the downhill shot the barrel which is carried in the raised ready position must be dropped significantly while the gun is being mounted to intercept the flight plan below. Gun comes up to shoulder as barrel is pulled downward. Forces on the gun are being applied at two almost opposite directions with each hand at the same time. Very awkward. Very different from shooting birds launched out of an overhead tree or skeet house. Surely an experienced shooter can see that?

                      Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 05-19-2020, 08:47 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Pighunter: You got eleven years out of a pair of nylon camo boots? Wow! No matter what the brand I can't get them to make it through two seasons. Brush eats that nylon stuff alive. Similarly, boots with nylon lace loops are a total bust. They won't last me even one season.

                        CD2: There are rubber boots and there are Muck Boots. Have you tried them? I love mine. A tip on those: roll down the neoprene tops when putting them on. Makes it easier to tuck in jeans. I wear mine almost exclusively now when hunting. Put a lot of miles on them every day and I'm a lot older than you. I don't find Mucks to be very noisy.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
                          Pighunter: You got eleven years out of a pair of nylon camo boots? Wow! No matter what the brand I can't get them to make it through two seasons. Brush eats that nylon stuff alive. Similarly, boots with nylon lace loops are a total bust. They won't last me even one season.

                          CD2: There are rubber boots and there are Muck Boots. Have you tried them? I love mine. A tip on those: roll down the neoprene tops when putting them on. Makes it easier to tuck in jeans. I wear mine almost exclusively now when hunting. Put a lot of miles on them every day and I'm a lot older than you. I don't find Mucks to be very noisy.
                          OHH, the length of use on that pair of boots surprises me too. It seemed like I was replacing cheaper boots every few years and Danner has a good reputation so why not experiment. I purchased them in the Fall of 2009 because I wanted a light pair of Gore-Tex lined boots for hunting in warm temps.

                          As it turned out, that November I started a 6-month assignment in Southern California that was for the most part a 40-hour per week job. I only traveled back to Alabama a couple weekends per month so that left me plenty of time to explore. That's where those Danner boots enter the picture. I wore those while hiking in the Joshua Tree National Park, various trails around Mt. San Antonio, Torrey Pines State Reserve, Sequoia National Park, and other minor trails. The boots were so comfortable that they became my standard wear for air travel too between East and West coasts.

                          The soles have a very shallow grip pattern so they don't pick up mud and hold it as would more aggressive lugged boots. That and because they are well vented are the reason I chose them for this past weekend's hunt in upper 80's temps along the muddy stream beds in the Talladega National Forest. Also, the soles are flexible enough that I can feel sticks beneath them when stalking and can choose my steps more wisely for stealth without looking down. The downside is that the boots were very slick trying to go up pinestraw covered slopes and they become uncomfortable when all the day's hiking was on rocks, after a while you can feel every step.

                          I have two other pairs of Danner hunting boots with thicker, more aggressive soles. Both are Gore-Tex lined 8-inch Pronghorns and one pair is insulated for use on cold days. So far they are holding up very well.

                          Now, my leather Danner boots are much hotter but that's what I wear at the paper mills and when doing work around the house. The soles wear out much faster, I guess because of all the walking on concrete. I'm on my second pair in 6 years. The soles on the 1st pair got too slick for safety on wet surfaces. Otherwise they are very tough with composite hard toes and non-conductive soles for working around electrical equipment.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post

                            This just gets sillier. You always have foot placement planned out in your head before a bird gets up, even though you hunt behind flushing dogs that push up birds as soon as they find them. Do you know how ridiculous that sounds to someone who really does have experience bird hunting? If my pointers have a bird locked down and I'm close, I will usually approach with drop-step, left foot first. But that's because they're on point. But behind flushers we have to keep up with the dogs. They're not going to wait if they find a bird. When hunting over flushers we obviously don't have the luxury of thinking about where our feet will be positioned when in hot pursuit, especially if struggling to maintain footing on the sides of a coulee or draw. Focus is on the what the dogs are doing and keeping up with them.

                            Yes, I have shot lots of grouse pushed out of trees and off the ground with a shotgun. Some of my best duck hunting spots when I was growing up had plenty of grouse in the nearby woods. Probably shot most of my grouse with Dad's K22 pistol when elk hunting. It fit in my backpack, a shotgun wouldn't. More importantly, a .22 long makes hardly any noise but a shotgun retort can be heard for miles. When hunting big game it's best not to advertise your presence.

                            Obviously shooting a grouse overhead out of a tree is not comparable to shooting a pheasant flushed in a coulee below and across the body. For the tree shot the gun barrel is raised as the gun is raised to meet the bird. Motion is all in the same general direction - upwards. For the downhill shot the barrel which is carried in the raised ready position must be dropped significantly while the gun is being mounted to intercept the flight plan below. Gun comes up to shoulder as barrel is pulled downward. Forces on the gun are being applied at two almost opposite directions with each hand at the same time. Very awkward. Very different from shooting birds launched out of an overhead tree or skeet house. Surely an experienced shooter can see that?
                            Honk,
                            Yes this gets sillier because you evidently can't chew gum and walk at the same time......
                            You bet I am focused on the dog and am quite in tune with what they are doing.
                            At this time I will repeat "maybe my springers are BETTER than you lab/brittany combo" that you are chasing after 😋
                            Once they dog has locked in on the scent and the flush is eminent there is about a 2 or 3​​second delay before the bird actually does flush. Having already scanned the area I have a very good idea of where the bird will flush from and what direction the bird will most likely fly by the position of the dog in relation to where the scent is coming from, that really helps me decide.
                            We have had this discussion before as well about that I hunt into the wind almost all the time. You seem to be unable to understand how this relates to that a majority of the birds flushed will fly with the wind vs into it. I move my feet to create better body position to take a hard & fast crossing shot at "usually" 20 - 25 yards.
                            A bird that flushes directly into the wind will just hang there, pretty easy point and shoot opportunity.....
                            So it seems very possible that despite your years of hunting & "chasing" these dogs you don't have any idea how they react before flushing a bird ?
                            In the scheme of things that is what sounds ridiculous, incredibly so I would say !!

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              My older Britt may as well be a flushing dog, I can usually tell when she's on scent by the way she works an area. She has a good nose and plenty of prey drive, probably too much. She'll point if she sees a pinned bird. If she keeps returning to one spot I know she's on one, problem is they usually flush out of range or in thick stuff where I don't get a look. Younger dog was coming on year before last. We're going to work her more this year, if we can get on birds she'll be fine.

                              I was under the impression you work into the wind whenever possible to give the dog's nose the advantage. Never thought about the flush.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Springerman: I don't think anyone on here is fooled by yourr artificial reality. Two or three second delay every time your flushers "lock onto a bird." What a load! Come on! You think I haven't hunted over flushing dogs? Wild pheasants will as often as not run when pushed by a flushing dog. And pushing the birds is what flushing dogs do. There is never any fixed couple second delay between the time the flusher gets birdy and when the bird goes in the air. Because we never know how far the bird will run from the dog before it flushes ... which is what makes hunting over flushers so exciting. If you were talking about grouse, that 2-3 second birdy-to-jump story might be slightly more believable ... because grouse don't run (not much anyway). And neither do farm raised pheasants. Is that what you're hunting?

                                And really, do you expect even those on here who don't hunt pheasants to believe every pheasant flushed either jumps into the wind or flies with it? In fact, as often as not they will run and jump crossways to wind direction. Once the dogs are pushing them pheasants rarely run into the wind. Obviously they don't want the wind blowing their scent to the dogs. As often as not they know where you are too. Most of the time on windy days in flat terrain a flushing dog will kick up a bird off to the side. In those situations pheasants usually rise and then turn, especially if they're not sure where the dog/shooter is located. And then as often as not, they turn towards the wind rather than coasting with it. Why? Because pheasants are heavy birds and need to get up in the air in a hurry which means they need lift i.e. pressure under their wings. If they jump immediately with the wind, they sacrifice elevation AND control. And control is something they are reluctant to give up. Pheasants usually jump into a hard wind and quickly turn and angle against it one direction or the other. A very difficult shot. Sometimes they may eventually drift downwind but for whatever reason I don't see it very often ... until they are way out there. Immediately floating with the wind after the flush is more common with smaller sharpies (very common) or Huns. Very rarely do pheasants jump directly into the wind and stay in that direction. But it does happen and yes it's usually an easy shot. Again, I think it has to do with pheasants larger weight and control issues. As I'm sure you know, pheasants, like turkeys, aren't terribly acrobatic in the air. They need to use the wind ... but not be overpowered by it. This is why on windy days in the open the presentation is usually a quick straght up off to one side, and then angling sideways to the wind. I almost never get a pure crossing shot on a windy day.

                                Unless hunting the wide open spaces it is difficult, if not impossible to always be hunting into the wind. The lay of the land figures into my approach more than wind direction. Canals and ditches where pheasants like to hide very rarely (if ever) are oriented perfectly for hunting against the wind.
                                Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 05-22-2020, 10:53 PM.

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