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Any Oklahoma Turkey Hunters?!

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  • Any Oklahoma Turkey Hunters?!

    Anyone from Oklahoma or have experience turkey hunting in Oklahoma? I’m new to hunting and looking for some advice and a network/community to chat with.

  • #2
    Yes sir.
    I'm down in the Lawton/Duncan area.
    As for a network, I'm a lone hunter. I'm old and crippled so I don't "run 'n gun" any longer or walk long distances.
    I only hunt private land and I do a lot of sitting, watching and listening.
    When season opens, I've set up hides and blinds, hopefully in the right locations so I can call receptive toms in. Click image for larger version

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    I don't use pop up blinds. The scramble of "stuff" behind the bird was my "hide".
    Click image for larger version

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    This is a fall bird I patterned, built a screen and caught them at a creek crossing.

    Click image for larger version

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    You don't need tons of cover.
    Figure out where the bird is most likely to appear, set your shotgun on a tripod and stay very still.

    Comment


    • #3
      Biggest help I can give you is this.
      Turkeys go through transitions.
      Each transition lasts about 2 weeks.

      In the spring, turkeys run in groups of toms or hens.
      That's "winter" mode or
      Transition 1.
      When they come out of winter mode, you will see large groups of mostly hens and a few toms. The toms will be strutting.
      I've seen a single hen with a tom strutting around. I've also see as many as 80 or so hens. There we 13 toms scattered across a bare ridge, strutting and gobbling.
      In this phase, most of the breeding takes place and hens begin to move off and nest. That's
      Transition 2.
      When hens move away to nest, old tom, who has recently had hens at his beck and call, gets really lonesome, really quick.
      Hens usually come out early morning to feed and seek out a gobbler.
      You can play the sweetest notes ever to come from a turkey call, and be rejected.
      Next day, you can call them with a rusty gate hinge.
      That's Transition 3! It's often compared to the rut with deer.

      After all the hens have moved off and nested, tom moves from strut zone to strut zone. A "strut zone" is where he has found hens in the past.
      Find his strut zones, put your calls away and ambush him when he comes to his zone.
      Transition 4.
      Lastly, hens will have poults on the ground and toms will be back in bachelor groups.
      Pattern late season toms like you pattern fall turkeys.
      That's Transition 5.

      Oklahoma "Spring Turkey" opens April 6.
      The last few years, turkey opening hits pretty close between transitions 2 & 3 and it's the best time to hunt.

      Good luck and good hunting out there at Black Kettle!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
        Biggest help I can give you is this.
        Turkeys go through transitions.
        Each transition lasts about 2 weeks.

        In the spring, turkeys run in groups of toms or hens.
        That's "winter" mode or
        Transition 1.
        When they come out of winter mode, you will see large groups of mostly hens and a few toms. The toms will be strutting.
        I've seen a single hen with a tom strutting around. I've also see as many as 80 or so hens. There we 13 toms scattered across a bare ridge, strutting and gobbling.
        In this phase, most of the breeding takes place and hens begin to move off and nest. That's
        Transition 2.
        When hens move away to nest, old tom, who has recently had hens at his beck and call, gets really lonesome, really quick.
        Hens usually come out early morning to feed and seek out a gobbler.
        You can play the sweetest notes ever to come from a turkey call, and be rejected.
        Next day, you can call them with a rusty gate hinge.
        That's Transition 3! It's often compared to the rut with deer.

        After all the hens have moved off and nested, tom moves from strut zone to strut zone. A "strut zone" is where he has found hens in the past.
        Find his strut zones, put your calls away and ambush him when he comes to his zone.
        Transition 4.
        Lastly, hens will have poults on the ground and toms will be back in bachelor groups.
        Pattern late season toms like you pattern fall turkeys.
        That's Transition 5.

        Oklahoma "Spring Turkey" opens April 6.
        The last few years, turkey opening hits pretty close between transitions 2 & 3 and it's the best time to hunt.

        Good luck and good hunting out there at Black Kettle!
        This information has been the most helpful thing I have found so fart about turkey hunting in Oklahoma and their patterns. I know our state has plenty of outdoors-man but there isn't much going on right now with the Oklahoma chapter other than banquets.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Big5ully9 View Post

          This information has been the most helpful thing I have found so fart about turkey hunting in Oklahoma and their patterns. I know our state has plenty of outdoors-man but there isn't much going on right now with the Oklahoma chapter other than banquets.
          I'm Texan by birth, Okie by marriage.
          I have found most of the Okies around where I hunt to be very hush-hush.
          Most of the landowners won't/don't hunt. They will drag a hook through every muddy creek, river, puddle, farm pond and lake within 5 counties. I don't understand it. They absolutely will not pop a primer.
          It's easier to ask to date their daughter than ask permission to hunt. Crazy!
          I did offer my neighbor money for a lease.
          Oh heck no! You just go hunt any time you want! WT...?
          Nobody in my area "talks" guns. They discuss "till/no till" all day long.
          Mention Win M12 and they stare at you like you have two heads.
          The youngsters, say 15 to about 25 will talk hunting with you, but even they don't want to hang out with a 70 year old that ain't kin! LOL! ...and I don't blame them!
          It's weird, but I've gotten used to it.
          It is what it is.
          I still find private hunting ground around. Good enough I suppose!

          Comment


          • #6
            Big5ully9,
            I was trading labor for hunting rights with a farmer. He had 800 acres of PRIME ground.
            Deer, turkeys, hogs aplenty!
            One Friday afternoon when I got through plowing, he dropped me off at one of my deer stands and tried to pay me.
            No, I'd rather hunt.
            I finally asked him if he knew just how much he could lease his hunting rights for?
            He looked me directly in the eye and said, "If there's anything I hate worse than deer, it's deer hunters!"
            I never mentioned it again! LOL!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
              Big5ully9,
              I was trading labor for hunting rights with a farmer. He had 800 acres of PRIME ground.
              Deer, turkeys, hogs aplenty!
              One Friday afternoon when I got through plowing, he dropped me off at one of my deer stands and tried to pay me.
              No, I'd rather hunt.
              I finally asked him if he knew just how much he could lease his hunting rights for?
              He looked me directly in the eye and said, "If there's anything I hate worse than deer, it's deer hunters!"
              I never mentioned it again! LOL!
              WOW! That's wild! Here in Payne county everyone loves hunting mostly deer and waterfowl but its prime real estate for big trophy bucks and people are paying out the A$$ to hunt. I can't and won't do that.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post

                I'm Texan by birth, Okie by marriage.
                I have found most of the Okies around where I hunt to be very hush-hush.
                Most of the landowners won't/don't hunt. They will drag a hook through every muddy creek, river, puddle, farm pond and lake within 5 counties. I don't understand it. They absolutely will not pop a primer.
                It's easier to ask to date their daughter than ask permission to hunt. Crazy!
                I did offer my neighbor money for a lease.
                Oh heck no! You just go hunt any time you want! WT...?
                Nobody in my area "talks" guns. They discuss "till/no till" all day long.
                Mention Win M12 and they stare at you like you have two heads.
                The youngsters, say 15 to about 25 will talk hunting with you, but even they don't want to hang out with a 70 year old that ain't kin! LOL! ...and I don't blame them!
                It's weird, but I've gotten used to it.
                It is what it is.
                I still find private hunting ground around. Good enough I suppose!
                Funny you say that, I grew up in Texas and moved to Oklahoma for college, met a girl, got married, and haven't been able to leave since! Ha! Where about in Texas? I'm from a town called Little Elm pretty much on Lake Lewisville.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Big5ully9 View Post

                  Funny you say that, I grew up in Texas and moved to Oklahoma for college, met a girl, got married, and haven't been able to leave since! Ha! Where about in Texas? I'm from a town called Little Elm pretty much on Lake Lewisville.
                  Deep east Texas near Palestine, Texas.

                  Where did you go to college? OU?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Big5ully9 View Post

                    Funny you say that, I grew up in Texas and moved to Oklahoma for college, met a girl, got married, and haven't been able to leave since! Ha! Where about in Texas? I'm from a town called Little Elm pretty much on Lake Lewisville.
                    I'm from texas too where was your college location?
                    usa today protonmail

                    Comment


                    • #11


                      With not many options left to hunt this late in the year its harder to get out and have a day in the field hunting! That just means more time to stew and plan and prep and practice for some spring turkey hunting.
                      Last edited by adomanim1; 05-03-2021, 01:31 PM.

                      Comment

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