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Watched several videos of pheasant hunting on the net last night. I was baffled at all the guys carrying their shotguns on thei

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  • Dangle
    replied
    Read what I said..."BS" "There is a big market for O/U upland bird guns by folks that want the pleasure of hunting with a fine hunting shotgun as a big part of their hunting experience. The market is in the slimmer frame, easy to carry, lighter weight 20 ga. With a fine O/U the swings the thing. They have the feel of wt on the swing given the double barrels, balance extremely well, and the knowledgeable owner takes advantage of the modern advancements in shotshell technology. I can shoot a 3" 1 1/4 Oz. lead load that is very comparable to the standard 12 ga pheasant field load. Ease of carry, gun gets up, and mounts better, and great swing capabilities....but I enjoy good equipment, and invest in my sport.

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  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Read what I said: "The American market for O/Us is PRIMARILY DIRECTED AT CLAY SHOOTING NOT HUNTING." I was not speaking about the American market for automatic shotguns.

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  • Dangle
    replied
    BS....The autoloader has taken over sales for clay shooting due to the recoil reduction, and enhanced performance of the new autoloaders,,,ease of cleaning etc. Many upland bird hunters that have the disposable income to invest in their sport, and appreciate the finer things in life hunt with O/U's. I'm no wealthy fellow at all, but I bird hunt more than anyone that I know...probably 75 days a season in the field, and I invested in a very good O/U that makes my days afield more enjoyable, and appreciated. Not good because of the expense of all the engraving, but the best made O/U for the money...a Beretta 20 ga. Silver 686.(around $2,100. And it is safe because of the ease of looking down the barrels for shells, or obstruction. And the fact it could be carried broken around other hunters which I don't do. And cold freezing weather? bang-bang always.

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  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Outside of USA and England it is common to find slings attached to quality manufactured shotguns intended for field use, no matter how many barrels they have. The American market for O/Us is primarily directed at clay shooting not hunting. Personally, I would be proud to show up at a top notch skeet competition with sling swivels attached to my O/U (if I had one). It would brand me as someone who actually gets out and works with his gun. I'm actually from blue collar working stock and still very proud of it. Anyway, a pretty shotgun will not do the job killing clays any better than a workhorse from the field.

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  • Dangle
    replied
    No slings on an O/U please ! An O/U upland bird gun has too much class to throw a sling on it! Guy calls to buy your O/U you've got listed, and you say "and the beauty of mine is I have a sling on it!" The guy responds, "Did you grow up in Arkansas?!" And the ease of carry is the broken breach. You don't even consider it with a fixed breach gun!

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  • Dangle
    replied
    Dakotaman. I hear you. But you needed to have dogs like Ontario has. They have the ability to lock down the bird until you approach. No runnin birds when Ontario freezes them up with that Brittany of his. I hunt cottantails, and right now...lava rock piles, and high, healthy sage brush, and in the snow. I use a bird dog, and have used two of them. They both will run, and retrieve them, but no quick fires. I have to know where both dogs are. A number of them I do not get a shot. I hunted with a guy that was a quick draw artist. I never got a shot hunting near him. I would barely get my gun started up, and he'd dump it. I just don't shoot that way. First thing for me is get the mental picture of the direction of the bird,,,rising,swinging etc. then the mount. And I'm not that interested in numbers with covey birds, or shooting doubles. It has to be a unique situation. I don't want to lose a down bird, and dumping multiple numbers, and you've not marked, or even remember where some went down. And small game birds like huns, quail are hard to find even with dogs.

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  • Dangle
    replied
    ozark...Good looking is a comparative term. A Warthog gets 5 stars for looks in Arkansas. Get yourself one of those little beagles, and let the rabbit, and the dogs do their 360. We'll even have a possum pie fund raiser dinner for you so you can afford one of those dawgs. You'll have plenty of time to load, and close that breach. The only time I ever hunted in Arkansas I shot somethin, and couldn't find out what it was in the game pamphlet. A game warden asked me to describe it, and I told him it had hair all over its body, and stunk like hell. Game guy said, "Oh my God!..you shot an Arkansas hillbilly!

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Ithaca: How hard is it to put a sling on O/U? I simply bought a magazine cap for my Browning A-5 and added the stud to the stock. My upland vest has a large inside zippered pocket in the back for lunches etc. and I stow the detachable sling in there while actually hunting. Have been known to throw it in with the birds but the blood in there is not too healthy for blued sling swivels.

    Leave a comment:


  • ITHACASXS
    replied
    As I wrote before, I never carry like that unless I'm done, finished, don't want and will not shoot (not always with a limit) and I just want to groove watching the dogs work and others connect. I have fun doing this, and even more as years go by. When I carry in this manner, my gun has empty, broken open barrels. I would never carry a pump or auto like this, even unloaded. OH, my dad also will use dotage when refering to himself.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    I am noticing my reflexes are considerably slower in my dotage. Add to that the necessity for ascertaining the sex of the bird first (with failing eyesight), I am lucky to get off more than one shot at a couple of flushing pheasants even if my Britt sets me up. Closing or loading a gun first would be out of the question. By the way, this is the first year I can remember where I didn't get a double (and a triple still eludes me). However, I probably shot more pheasants this fall than any previous year, even though numbers definitely were lower than usual.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    Dangle, your technique is well suited to tracking down dispersed quail and jumping them with pointers. Not all situations are like that though.

    I grew up hunting pheasants in South Dakota and it took me about 10 years to get fast enough to get a shot before one of my older family members hadn't already shot the bird. I'd bet that most of my hunting companions in SD fire their first shot within about a half second. I'd further speculate that they would have downed at least three out of a flock by the time you got your gun in position to shoot. If you carried it with the breech open and had to shove shells in, you would be just in time to retrieve the last of their birds.

    With wild pheasants and rabbits a second of wait is long enough to lose many of them in the brush or to let them get out of range. Although I hunted with dogs, I saw very few pheasants that sat still long enough for a dog to point. For every pheasant that rose at 20 yards, there were a hundred that rose at 50.

    I know most of us don't hunt birds enough to do this but I've seen my brother take five quail out of a flock before a neighboring hunter got his first shot off. No O/U for me... they quit shooting just about the time it gets interesting.

    Leave a comment:


  • ozarkghost
    replied
    Dangle, being in AR is a God given reward for being so good looking!

    As far as what I was referring to on jumping game, I have never seen a rabbit who has been jumped stick around long enough to let a hunter load and close the breach on a shotgun in time to shoot it. Same goes for quail and doves. Now, admittedly, I have never hunted any of the above mentioned birds but have hunted quail, dove, rabbit, and squirrel and there is just no time to do all of that and get a shot in. And being a poor ole AR Hillbilly I don't have dogs to hunt behind bird hunting. Don't have a squirrel/rabbit/coon dog either since that dang Yankee shot it, or was it a Texan?

    Leave a comment:


  • Dangle
    replied
    Didn't know you were from Arkansas...answers everything. And the guys you watched on TV were hunting pheasants, and in a prescribed way. Just watched the guy on Wing Shooting TV, and he hunts often with a SxS. Hunts the way described. On a recent Sharptail, and Prairie Chicken hunt they hunted on horses in S. Dakota, and when the dogs got birdie they had time to get of their horses, and load up. What can be deceiving on TV is the editing they most often do in order to get a good show.

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  • ozarkghost
    replied
    Okay guys I am just an ignorant poor Arkansas Hillbilly, but I have never seen, nor heard of, a double, o/u, single shot break action shotgun going off accidentally or other wise when the action is open even if there is a shell in the chamber. It does not seem likely that one would fire because there is nothing to hit the primer with enough force to make it fire. For range safety, especially when changing stations at any distance or coming off of the firing line, it makes sense to carry this way. It would be the quickest way for a range safety officer(s) to ensure that a weapon is unloaded and unlikely to kill some one. To carry it this way when you might 'jump' game at any time makes no sense. It would take way too much time to load and close the action to make a shot on a flushed game animal who is hell bent to getting out of the area.

    Sarge01 I agree that the best way to carry a long weapon is pointed at the ground or in a safe direction away from other hunters. I have always, when hunting with my grandson, taken the right rear position to him so that he can more naturally carry his weapon. After so many years in the military, I KNOW where my muzzle is and where my finger is. I don't know where someone else's is.

    Leave a comment:


  • txcoonhunter
    replied
    I carry my single shot 20 gauge like that sometimes just because it is comfortable.

    Leave a comment:

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