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Watched several videos of pheasant hunting on the net last night. I was baffled at all the guys carrying their shotguns on thei

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  • Watched several videos of pheasant hunting on the net last night. I was baffled at all the guys carrying their shotguns on thei

    Watched several videos of pheasant hunting on the net last night. I was baffled at all the guys carrying their shotguns on their shoulder grasping the barrel with buttstock behind them. What's up with that? Gotta be some kind of dopey fashion statement. Can't be comfortable and sure as hell isn't practical. Do any of you carry a shotgun like that? Why?

  • #2
    Guys around the skeet and trap range carry them open like that to show everyone they are unloaded.

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    • #3
      It's a safe way to carry when your companion is walking behind you.

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      • #4
        If I am done shooting and just watching my son and others, I'll break my gun (unloaded of course) and carry it like that sometimes.I do have a slip on sling stashed in my vest that I always forget about.

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        • #5
          when I am hunting with my break action I will sometimes carry it that way when walking back to the truck. only when there isn't a chance of jumping a deer though.

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          • #6
            If I'm in a position where I'm not hunting but in the field I will carry it like that once in a while. I actually find it quite comfortable.

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            • #7
              I've seen a lot of African big game hunters carry their rifle that way. I hope the guys to either side of me carry theirs that way while pheasant, quail or rabbit hunting. I'll get plenty of time for a great shot and I doubt they will get many doubles or triples.

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              • #8
                I think that the original idea like Dakota said came from the African Professional Hunters and everyone thought it looked cool and started doing it. I don't recommend it to my Hunter Ed students. I recommend them to carry their firearm pointed to the ground which I think is a much safer carry. If you watch the African Professional hunters and some pheasant hunters you will see that their firearms are loaded, and I don't want to grab any loaded firearm by the end of the barrel. To me this is not a safe way to handle a loaded firearm.

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                • #9
                  Anytime you fall it is possible for the gun to go off if you are relying on your safety, You have to be hunting with double barrel break action shotguns, and be hunting over pointing dogs. Safe way to hunt is why they do it as stated by a number of posters. No shotgun safer than an O/U, or a double barrel, or a single shot that you seldom see used, but safe.

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                  • #10
                    Ummm. I see. I didn't think it would be comfortable but maybe it's more comfortable with a break action than trying to walk with it cocked under the arm and broken. I don't hunt with an unloaded gun. Even if I have filled my daily bag of pheasants, there's always a possibility of shooting sharpies or huns on the way back to the vehicle. Or blasting a badger that's going after one of my dogs. I will unload my guns when walking out after dark but usually have them slung on shoulder ... NEVER carry a gun up on my shoulder. Seems to bother both my shoulder and my elbow. If no sling the gun is carried crooked over my arm. And when the temps fall below zero I certainly don't want to be hanging on to a bunch of metal if I don't have to.

                    Some of the video goofs I have been watching are duck hunters carrying autos by the barrel. Purely hot dog I guess. Neither functional or comfortable.

                    Personally, if I had a fancy O/U I would be loath to carry it by the barrel knowing what the salts in my hand can do to the bluing. Much less metal to worry about hands contacting in the tang area.

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                    • #11
                      And Sarge, I agree. Kids should always be taught (especially by example!) to keep gun barrels pointed at the ground rather than waving around up on shoulders.

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                      • #12
                        Honk
                        Think Occam's Razor!

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                        • #13
                          Ontario needs to move to town, and take the paper..buy himself a nice O/U with mod., and an IC screwin chokes, and see how comfortable that does feel on your shoulder. Buy e-collars for his dogs to keep them in range, and find out how easy it is to lower the nice O/U to the ready when the dogs get birdie. Called stylin.

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                          • #14
                            Safety, safety, safety, Our dog training chapter insists on break action guns and carried in this manner. With a break action gun, this method is quite comfortable. Your finger is no where near the trigger too. Yes, this method works best with pointing dogs. When hunters are more spread out or hunting alone, I do carry gun in front muzzle down. As for your hand corroding the barrel, a thin pair of gloves like those used in the packing industry actually work well, even in the summer. They are nice when handling birds in training young dogs. They have all the warmth I need in winter bird hunting plus great dexterity.

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                            • #15
                              And where the rubber meets the road.... Most shooters are right handed. Most hunting pheasants deploying the strategy of driving roosters to the end of the field where gunners are stationed do not drive in a line all that far apart not wanting birds to escape behind them. SOOOOOO.....does a right handed hunter walk with the gun pointed straight ahead?.. or do they walk with the gun pointed down, and angled to the left side say 30-45 degrees to the side? When they fall does that gun then get thrown to the left?...and do they fall on their right shoulder clearing the way for the gun to go to the left? So, I'm some 10 yds to the left, am I assured that safety kept the gun from firing? Just sayin for debate sake. I am rt. handed, and have taken a number of falls in the last several years hunting with the gun pointed down, and I know where the gun ends up hitting the ground. And I always get up, and check if the safety remained on safe. But I hunt by myself, and my dogs only.

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