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I'm in the military stationed in KS, I've been hunting waterfowl for about five years now on public land but in that time I've n

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  • I'm in the military stationed in KS, I've been hunting waterfowl for about five years now on public land but in that time I've n

    I'm in the military stationed in KS, I've been hunting waterfowl for about five years now on public land but in that time I've noticed it to be almost a race to get to the grounds to lock down a spot, every year I wake up earlier and earlier which turns out to be almost six hours before shoot light. To make this more about having fun and less about rushing I want to ask a nearby landowner if it would be possible to hunt his land during the goose season (they love his field but nobody hunts it), what would be the best way to ask, would it be beneficial to offer him some of the spoils of my labor, maybe even put his mind at ease about cleanup making him aware that I reload my own shells so cleanup would not be an issue, and should I call or approach him directly? Any help with this issue would be greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    Make contact early, introduce yourself. Have some cards made up with your service info and your name and address. Might work, you never know until you approach the person how they feel about hunting.

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    • #3
      Approach him directly, be well groomed (I assume you would be as a military man), and polite. Your first impression is the most important. If he doesn't like you right off, none of the other stuff will make a difference. If he says yes, take the initiative and just give him some of your game, or take him something else as a way of saying thanks.
      Good luck

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      • #4
        1st of all, thank you for your service to this country, and everyone else on this site. 2nd, early bird gets the worm.

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        • #5
          I have found that being polite, strait forward, and dressed nice (clean/ironed shirt, ironed jeans and belt is my usual) is the best way to ask. I also check for no hunting signs before I go onto a property and won't ask if I see them. Also if you are hunting privet land that does not require permission(there are a few spots here in AZ and back in NY) they are usually really large plots of privet land that rotationally grazes livestock where you can hunt areas where the livestock are not being grazed. A friend of mine was going about 30mph down a rode once when the landowner flagged him down and asked him why he was going so fast. He told him that he was moving to another hunting spot and asked the man what the speed limit was on the road. The owner said that there was no limit because it was a privet road but what does my friend feel is a safe speed? He politely told the man that he felt that he had no say seeing as it was the mans road. the man said 20 sounds fair to him and my friend agreed right away and politely left. (not going over 20mph for the rest of the trip) the next day after shooting a great bull on the privet property on his way back to camp he ran into the owner who again flagged him down and said that he had seen him a few times since their chat and he was always going slow. the owner thanked him for the respect then offered his tractor, saw zaw, and help cleaning the bull. It pays off to listen to the land owners turning a job that would take nearly an hour with the knives he had turned into a 15 min process.

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          • #6
            after"does not require permission" alway listen to the land owner*

            road opposed to rode*

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            • #7
              Tell him you'll be glad to help with maintenance in any way you can. Always carry a fencing tool when hunting and make repairs as you discover them. Farmers REALLY like that! Ask if you can help with harvest. Farmers often need someone to help drive trucks from fields to barn/granaries. A straight truck (as opposed to a semi-trailer) is easy enough to operate if you're familiar with stick shift. Farmer can easily get you up to speed with 2-speed axle if necessary. And if you're hauling farm produce within 100 miles no special license is necessary. I had a great cow horse in my younger days. Was very busy helping out at branding and fall roundup. Never had trouble finding a place to hunt! My guess is the farmer won't be much interested in taking any geese off your hands. Look around. You can likely find something else to break the ice. Talk about vehicles, price of beef, crops he's growing, whatever. Be nice and dress with some respect for yourself. Be careful about the serviceman approach. Sadly, the servicemen on bases are all too often slob hunters. Wish it wasn't true as I am a vet myself. But I know what it's like near Great Falls, MT. I'm not sure that per capita servicemen are any worse slob hunters than others in the field. But they are, as you know, quite distinctive usually (personal appearance and sticker on their vehicles). So, because of a few jerks all servicemen get labeled as slobs. Maybe don't identify yourself as one right off the bat. Feel the situation out first. Once you get to know the guy then maybe open up. However, if he asks, don't lie about it.

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              • #8
                As kids, if we weren't working our nickle ninety eight jobs, we spent our time driving backroads.
                Any time we spotted a farmer, we stopped, spoke and introduced ourselves.. We never failed to ask about exchanging some chore for hunting "rights".
                We met some neat folks....and some real crabs! LOL!
                if we could pick up 2 or 3 spots out of 15 or 20 contacts, we felt pretty lucky!
                One guy we met couldn't keep a knife sharp. We hunted on him six years until he died for a Case 2 blade Trapper each fall!

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                • #9
                  Thanks everyone for some great ideas. I have been told about the military thing before, guess when they see out of state plates some slam the door in your face. I'll keep an eye out when I'm driving around

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                  • #10
                    joel, if you're stationed there, get your plates changed. I know, often military are exempt from rules requiring you to change your plates. But in this case, saving a few dollars might cost you a lot. Leave the fatigues home, of course, and keep a cap on. Also, make sure you tell the farmer you have no plans to dig a pit blind. Hopefully you have a layout blind. You'll likely need one. Farmers in Kansas often need help with irrigation this time of year. Offer to give a hand with that. It can be labor intensive hot work and any help is usually welcome.

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