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Tell me what I'm doin wrong! Hunting turkeys this year and haven't heard a gobble yet. Seen sign everywhere I go. Been told I'm

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  • Tell me what I'm doin wrong! Hunting turkeys this year and haven't heard a gobble yet. Seen sign everywhere I go. Been told I'm

    Tell me what I'm doin wrong! Hunting turkeys this year and haven't heard a gobble yet. Seen sign everywhere I go. Been told I'm a good caller but I can't get anything to answer me. Always try locator calls first because I'm hunting on public land (44,000 acres) here in Md. and don't want to make the turkeys call skiddish. Drove all around last Sat. and stop and call, stop and call/nothing. Went and sat for a couple hours with my decoy and called every 15-20 mins. with no response or seeing anything. See turkeys all over the place during deer season so I know they're there. Doesn't seem to be alot of pressure on them this spring.Have Memorial Day weekend (last day) to get it done. I need help or should I go trout fishing early and the Hell with the turkeys! Thanks!

  • #2
    Sorry dude, I'm in the same boat!

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    • #3
      You answered your own question.
      "drove all around". Turkeys/deer know what a vhic. is and will avoid like the "FLU"(lol/sorry to easy).
      You need to get with "Del in KS".
      He's my new turkey "GURU".H He's taken over 60/70 over the years. Wait for his answer or ask him directly in your question.

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      • #4
        Big O is right, turkeys have the best set of senses, short of smell, of anything out there and are more paranoid than any whitetail. Find a set of ridges away from the roads, take your time, and work them end to end, calling every 150 yards or so. Change up your calls as well as what might work today will be totally ignored tomorrow. Try to find a call that not everybody else is using, try to offer the bird something he's not used to hearing. Same thing with shock calls. Forget the crow, everybody has that. I heard turkeys gobbling at geese passing by this spring. Get yourself a goose or pileated woodpecker or hawk call, that usually works pretty well. Sitting with the decoy as in bowhunting may work by pure chance occasionally but not too often, you have to get out and look for them, invest some boot leather. Work on your woodsmanship, stay quiet other than your calling, try to keep your presence to a minimum, and don't expect them to always gobble on schedule. Sometimes they ring the woods at first light, then clam up till 10-11 or even later. If you do get onto one that won't play, he's probably henned up, try to either get ahead of them and cut them off as they travel, or else try calling the hens to you in hopes that he will follow. When setting up, try to get close, but not too close, he knows where you are already, and on public land, BE CAREFUL OF NUTS WITH GUNS AND NO SENSE!!! Be patient, it will come. As one wise old turkey hunter once said, a deer thinks every man he sees is a stump, but a gobbler thinks every stump he sees is a man with a gun.

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        • #5
          The fellows above have given you some very good info. Public land birds get used and abused from folks onvehicles, particularly 4 wheelers blowing every kind of locator call known to mankind. This harrassment usually begins way before the season. Your own two feet are your best turkey hunting advantage.

          Another mistake made by hunters on public land is to walk the roads and trails and do all thier calling from them. Birds get used to this and won't respond. Get off the roads and trails and move as silently as possible by working interconnecting ridge lines.

          Get into the woods well before dawn and listen for activity. This could be the sound of hens tree calling, or just the sounds of birds flying down from roost. Gobblers in the company of hens may not gobble at all.

          Call softly and only ocassionally. If sitting and calling at one location where you have seen much sign ocassional lite clucks and purrs are more effective than frequent yelps. Scratching in the leaves in a 1/2/3 cadence (scratch-scratch-scratch) is also an effective technique as it mimics natural feeding sounds.

          Balance your calling to what you hear in the woods. cutting and loud yelping to quiet birds seldom accomplishes much on public land.

          Click on my icon to see a big bird I took on April 13 on public land. I killed the heavily hunted bird in the afternoon (5 PM) using the tactics I related above. He and his running buddy did not gobble. They replied to my soft calling only by yelping back softly. Both came in strutting. He was my 75th long long beard.

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          • #6
            Bee ran me under the porch. Can't add anything to that but here's a story. Early one morning in 1988 I was set up on a bird on the Ft. Leonard Wood reservation. My truck was parked half a mile away. I walked in before dawn and this bird had answered the old "who cooks for you, who cooks for you awwwwwlll". Suddenly in the distance there came the sound of an old pickup with noisy dual exhaust coming down a nearby road. By the sound I could tell the truck was stopping every couple hundred yards. "My" bird which had gobbled several times went silent. Momemts later the "pilgrim" braked on the road only about 100 yards away. With the motor idling he owl hooted twice and then moved on down the road fading away in the distance still stopping and hooting. Unfortunately the bird flew down and hot footed out of the area. He only gobbled once after the truck came by. Are you like that guy? If so that might be the problem. Do you wear complete camoflage and sit absolutely still? If not you are being seen before you see them.

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            • #7
              I took Dan and Billy out this morning for another try. Billy has taken 5 gobblers in 3 states so far and has 1 tag left, Dan is still looking for No. 1. My job was caller and picture taker (no tags).
              Well, the trees are fully leafed out now and although we heard several birds nothing was seen. One bird came in, gobbled, pooped on Dan's boots and left without anyone seeing so much as a feather,ha,ha. Seriously they are hard to see in the brush and weeds now that everything is green.

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              • #8
                When your hunting a strip of land that gets hunted heavily, usually the turkeys are used to calling. What you have to do is get a box call or diaphram, whatever you are comfortable with, and just cluck a little bit and when you know a bird is coming in to you don't call too much and if you can try to rake the leaves to sound like a hens feeding. And remember, if you had a turkey responding to your clucks, and he stops gobbling, he's either coming or leaving so keep your gun on your knee!

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