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Product Review: Top Paw® Universal Pet Barrier. See first post.

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  • Product Review: Top Paw® Universal Pet Barrier. See first post.

    Product Review: Top Paw® Universal Pet Barrier. See first post.

  • #2
    Here's an image of the product: h.ttp://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=16155156

    Until now I haven't been terribly keen on putting up a serious pet barrier in my SUV (1999 Jimmy). Most of the time my three dogs were good about staying in their space in the cargo area. But now with the tiny new baby riding in a rear passenger seat, it was imperative that they not be jumping around. So, I went back to the box store pet supply to see what they had. Two years ago I tried a rather expensive model that was crap. Had to take it back. This time I saw they had something new that wasn't mesh but rather three horizontal rectangular shaped expandable tubes. Hmmm. And it was also a lot cheaper than the crappy model. So I bought one and was rather pleasantly supplied.

    First of all, the Top Paw® Universal Pet Barrier is anything but universal! It should NOT be used for small dogs or cats (the latter usually travel best when tied to the bumper anyway). Too easy for small pets to get their heads caught between the tubing. It wasn't too hard to assemble but a little tricky to erect. Best attempted with an extra pair of helping hands. The barrier utilizes a typical adjusted compression fit between the floor and the headliner. I got it up okay and it seemed surprisingly sturdy but decided to give it a try and took the dogs to the park near our home. Sure enough they went ape as soon as they saw the water at the park reservoir and the pup stressed the barrier till it fell down. Hmmm. Ah, ha! Dug into my tool box and pulled out a couple of large plastic ties (NO TOOLBOX SHOULD BE WITHOUT THESE AND DUCT TAPE!). I readjusted the vertical bars so they were directly behind the headrests, tied them to the headrest support rods, and then readjusted the tightening wing nuts at the bottom. The barrier is now totally secure! I like the tube design as opposed to the mesh screen type because it's easier to see through it with rearview mirror (mind you, with three dogs back there it's not very easy to watch the road behind me anyway). And what's really sweet is this barrier doesn't rattle like most of them. A great value at just fifty bucks (Canadian $). It works great ... but only if your a bit on the handy side. For those who are and own mid to large-size dogs, I give this one five stars. For those who are maybe not so handy, two and a half. For those who have small pets, zero stars.

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    • #3
      It looks almost exactly like the one I got. I cant remember the brand, but yes, it does work very well. My lab did manage to figure out how to wiggle the horizontal bars so they slid in and he was able to rest his head on the back of the seat. Not to big of a deal, but it keeps them from jumping in the back seat, or worse, (like my lab did) chew on the back seat.

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      • #4
        LostLure: This model has so many tightening knobs that I don't see how the dogs could push the tubes back together unless they somehow push the entire bracket sideways. To stop that I'd recommend doing as above and using ties to secure the posts to headrest. Or if you need to keep him totally away from any contact with the seats, you could try ripping a board about 1.5" wide and to length exactly the width of floor of cargo area in your vehicle. Then drill two half inch holes exactly where you want the bottom of the posts situated. Lay it on the cargo floor, insert the screw studs in the holes when you set up the barrier, and tighten it up. Either method should stop the posts from migrating towards the center of the vehicle. Good luck.

        Never had a problem with pups going after upholstery but they sure love to chew up shifter handles!

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        • #5
          Thats a good idea to do that, but my wife solved the problem and just found a kennel that fits in the back. The lab goes in there, and my golden gets the other side, he doesnt try wiggle bars to the side.

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