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I am a 13 year old kid who wants to know everything about turkey hunting because I want to go turkey hunting this spring. What g

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  • I am a 13 year old kid who wants to know everything about turkey hunting because I want to go turkey hunting this spring. What g

    I am a 13 year old kid who wants to know everything about turkey hunting because I want to go turkey hunting this spring. What gear do you need and how do you find them to get a shot?

  • #2
    Also can turkeys see hunter orange. And if they can how do you keep yourself safe.

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    • #3
      If your state has a turkey hunting seminar you should attend. Lots of information and safety concerns are taught.

      Comment


      • #4
        Find a relative or a church member or maybe even go with a friend who has a dad that takes him hunting. Learning on your own would be interesting but you'll learn a lot faster having somebody show you. Do you have a shotgun, boots and camo? And to answer your question: yes, turkeys see color. (they probably see better than people). If you want you can wear a vest up until you locate a huntable tom but I don't usually wear hunter orange because I hunt private property and don't see a need cause I look nothing like a turkey. But saying that doesn't stop idiots! Good luck and stay safe!

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        • #5
          Do you have someone to take you turkey hunting? If not, I recommend getting an experienced mentor so you can learn the basics of turkey hunting.

          Turkeys can see all colors very well. You can keep yourself safe by wearing an orange cap when moving, and keeping the cap in a pocket so you can flash it to hunters that invade your space so they know you're not a turkey.

          There's lots of good information about turkeys and turkey hunting at the National Wild Turkey Federation's website www.nwtf.org/

          Good luck!

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          • #6
            definitely not an easy sport to take up on your own. for a beginner that wants to give it a crack heres the basics.

            -shotgun, preferably 12 gauge shooting at minimum 3" #6's with at least a full choke
            -full camo is a must, this includes facemask and gloves, leave no skin showing, and absolutely no red white or blue showing. (turkeys can see these colors well and all these colors appear on a gobblers head so its a safety concern). if you wear hunter orange you will never kill one. wear it while walking around moving to different calling locations but get rid of it when you begin to sit and call.
            -get a double reed diaphram mouth call. all you really need to be able to do is become somewhat proficient at yelps and clucks. remember tone and sound are less important then cadence, so get yourself a dvd on hen calls and try to emulate the cadence the birds use.
            -the most important is try to hook up with an experienced turkey hunter who can show you the ropes, you will drive yourself crazy trying on your own as a beginner trying to kill one unless you get very lucky.

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            • #7
              Hunter98.6, First off, as you're pretty young, have you had a hunter safety course? Not to scare you but this is important, spring gobbler hunting is dangerous and you stand a good chance of calling up a man with a shotgun, looking for you. If you do see another hunter, don't wave or motion, call out in a loud voice and let them know where you are, no bird is worth catching a load of shot. If on public land or other places where other people may be, wear blaze orange when locating until the bird starts his approach. As to the birds, 12 ga. is good with #4,5,or 6 shot, whichever your gun patterns the best at 30-35 yards, or if you have a 3" 20 ga. that will pattern those shot sizes at that range, that will suffice, you just have to be a little meticulous in shot placement (always head and neck, never the body with shotgun). Full camo including mask & gloves in a pattern appropriate to the season and foliage, probably easiest to learn on a friction type call (slate, box, push-pull, etc) from an instruction CD. Concentrate on cadence and volume more than tone, learn the basic yelp, cackle, and kee kee run for spring hunting. Practice with your gun from a sitting down position with your back against something that would simulate a woods setting, work on your woodsmanship (get around quietly, blend in, etc). Go out well before daylight, a week or so before the season, and listen for birds waking up on the roost (hens tree calling and cackling, toms gobbling) and get a good handle on their location, do the same thing at dusk, listening for them to fly up and gobble. Once the season is in and you've located the roost, try to get about 100 yards from them, set up against a big tree or similar backstop to break up your outline and protect you from fools who might shoot at the source of calling from behind you (morons turkey hunt too) and wait for that first gobble. Answer with subtle and quiet tree calls (gentle yelps) until he starts answering and flies down. About that time hit him with a cackle and start answering with yelps and do NOT overcall, play hard to get but also respond to him accordingly, if he keeps answering, keep calling, just be coy about it. Here's where it gets tricky, try to control your pulse as ol' thunder gets closer. Try to set up in an open place, they don't like thickets. Have your gun up on a knee, don't try to quick draw on him, that won't happen. Watch for that head and neck to periscope up, hopefully in the direction your gun is pointing in, and when he's within your effective range, whip it on him. I know, long and rambling, but at the same time these are the basics. If you work at it you'll learn something new each time and soon find yourself addicted. Like an old boy told me once, that spring turkey hunting is like drinking and gambling, it gets in your blood. Good hunting.

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              • #8
                I would hunt with my dad(who has never gone turkey hunting either) and probably on private land. Will you find turkeys if you don't see or hear any signs of them while preseason scouting or should you not hunt this property? Do you need decoys?
                P.S. 007, I have had hunter safety course.

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                • #9
                  The advice about mentors is spot on. Even with help it took my three years to kill a turkey and four to call one in on my own last year.
                  Another great resource is Ray Eye's book Practical Turkey Hunting Strategies. It won't replace a mentor, patterning your gun and calling practice but he does a great job of explaining strategy and technique.
                  You will get lots of conflicting advice about guns and loads. For what it's worth I have used a 20ga with #6 Hevishot to good effect.
                  Good luck, it is great fun!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Decoys are not necessary but I guess help in certain situations. I've only killed maybe one tom while using a decoy. If you don't hear any during preseason don't sweat it. Like any other game animal turkeys will have some days where they'll gobble their heads off and be super active and others they won't make a peep. But that doesn't mean that you shouldn't scout. Get out there learn the territory if you can glass fields find strutting grounds and maybe some roost. I usually walk and call which is where if I can't find a tom to hunt first thing in the morning I'll walk 150-200 yards and make a few calls and occasionally I'll set up for about half an hour and call every so often. Sometimes birds will slip up on you and not make the first sound.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      So exactly what kind of calls should i get ?

                      Thanks for all of the advice.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Box call, mouth call (aka diaphragm call), or slate. You don't need to spend a ton of money on calls. The most valuable one to learn will be the mouth call. The other calls are easier to learn, but require more movement. Practice A LOT with a mouth call. Use the NWTF website to help mimic different types of calls, but do not underestimate the value of a basic yelp. Watching hunting shows can help you mimic calling, but knowing when to call and when to shut up takes experience. A lot of the birds I kill come in with minimal calling. If you're not sure how much to call, err on the side of less rather than more.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You sound just like me. When i was your age i saw an article in F&S about a homeade turkey call. i made it (it was the corn cob striker, and i used a piece of slate i found by the RR tracks. I had a 20 gauge with mod. choke. I did not shoot anything, but i didn't give up. Every year i got more gear (turkey choke, box call, decoys, exc.) By the begginging of my fourth season, i called a big ol tom to about 5 yards. Like 007 said, you have to try to keep control of your pulse, because i choked. I guess my point is to not give up. I finnaly got my turkey, and nobody ever helped me. Just keep at. As far as gear goes, a hen decoy works, and maybe a jake. Carry at least one type of call, i would suggest a box call. Full camo, including a headnet is a must. I'm sure your dad would enjoy an elevated turkey seat, sitting on tree roots isn't great on the back. I would also have your dad find a good recipe, just in case, good luck!

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                          • #14
                            I have found the slate calls to be the easiest to get realistic yelps out of. Next would be box calls and finally diaphragm or mouth calls. All of them require a lot of practice to get really good at (which I am not).
                            There are lots of calling dvds for sale and on youtube. Listen and practice and you will be out having fun in no time. Turkeys are so cool to watch do their thing. 007 is right it gets in your blood.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Buy Tom Kelly's book/CD "A Fork In the Road" which is especially for beginning turkey hunters. It is informative and entertaining---full of great info.

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