Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A tip for shooting geese. See first post.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • A tip for shooting geese. See first post.

    A tip for shooting geese. See first post.

  • #2
    I have been shooting well below my average for geese this season. Most days about one bird for every third shot. Anyone who has hunted with me knows I'm no skybuster. Once in a while I'll try popping one at 45 yards but generally I stick to 35 to 40 yards, good killing distances. Occasionally I'll really nail one but more often than not the birds I get have only taken a couple of BBs. In contrast, I have been shooting nearly 100% on ducks this season! And getting quite a bit more shooting for them than usual. This morning, for example, I could not bring down anything in the first four shots at geese. And they were good shots too. After the flights dropped off about 10:30 I walked the dogs to a couple of potholes for ducks. Got two passing over trying to land. Both were at least 35 yard shots and both ducks were nailed! The mallard soaked up five #2 shot and the little gadwall hen took three. Both fell like a rock. And I can cite other similar examples of deadly duck shooting. So what am I doing wrong when shooting at geese?

    It has occurred to me that because the ducks are much smaller targets I am being by necessity much more precise in my aim (or rather, pointing). I think I need to pick out a part of the goose (e.g. bill or breast) rather than pointing the barrel at the whole bird. I'm hearing a lot of shots rattling off their wings so it's clear I'm off target slightly. There's just too much to point at if I try pointing at "the whole bird." If tonight is any indication, tomorrow morning I'll probably have at least three thousand geese landing in or near my decoys. I should get many opportunities to practice this technique and see if it makes a differencee.

    Comment


    • #3
      You said it bro. Pic a spot, not a bird. It sounds like you're pretty well a dead eye. You're just getting too much target and it's causing carelessness. You own it now though. Bring in a big haul and post a pic for us.

      Comment


      • #4

        No, a total misconception in your mind Ontario! and interpretation of your problem !...that ain't it because the ducks are smaller. There can be factors like misjudging speed, and distance because of the bigger size of geese...but generally it is this...the shotgun was mounted TOOOOOOO long on your shoulder in taking shots at geese. Those walking the dog shots at ducks, and then the quicker shots at passing ducks IS THE RIGHT WAY TOO SHOOT! Any shotgunner that has done a lot of pass shooting, or shooting at moving upland birds as well will quote the time a bird flew by un-noticed until it was right on top of them, and then they spun, and shot, and down it came....like it was an incredible shot..NO it wasn't! They shot the shotgun like they should have. Eye on the bird, mount, squeeze the trigger. When you have too much time, you want to "be more accurate", or however you said it. It all means the same thing. YOu move the gun barrel, and then for a split, conscious fraction of a second, you "make sure you are on target." I don't care what you mind thinks it visualized at the time the trigger was pulled, you shot behind the bird. You can be absolutely certain in your mind that you were at least 6 ft. out front of that bird....but you weren't. YOu shot behind it. Trust me on that one. I'd say when shooting ducks you swing, and pull the trigger keeping your eyes on the moving target, and when you shoot at a bigger goose, you check to make sure you are making a head/neck shot, and you shoot behind them. And I am not advocating mounting the gun fast! You mount the gun smoothly moving in the direction of the flight of the bird, and when mounted to your check within a very short time frame, you should be pulling the trigger.

        Comment


        • #5
          interesting, clinchknot, you could be right

          Comment


          • #6

            Trust me on that one. The difference is..conscious thought has a time laps. When you take your time to "make sure" you are on target several bad things happen. One, you often look down the barrel to make sure, right at the end "just to check" and that slows, stops the barrel. TWO. Sending an impulse to the brain to shoot, and then the time lapse pulling the trigger, and even a slight, micro time lapse for the shell to touch off, translates to a distance forward that the bird flies, and you shoot behind even though you were certain you were out front. Subconscious thought is instantaneous. Eye on the target, barrel moves ahead, as you keep your eye on the target and you subconsciously determine lead according to the angle by having shot that angle before, and the brain says to touch off the shot. Your eyes never leave the target. The two mental processes are distinctively different. And those quick shots where you didn't see the incoming bird, or passing pheasant, whatever, are usually always subconscious reactions. And a good red flag for me that I "checked to see that I was on target?" I remember precisely seeing how far the barrel was out front of the bird! When that happens, I know what I did wrong.

            Comment


            • #7
              Tracer birdshot would be helpful in diagnosing a problem like this. I don't know if anyone is still making the stuff.

              Comment


              • #8

                Tell you an easy tracer I watched on a U-tube, duck hunting,East Coast, saltwater video lately. These two guys had a blind set up on the shoreline. Several fast flying ducks came flying across in front of them, and this guy fires, one, two, three times, and the other guy says, "You shot behind them everytime." You chould see the pattern hit the water as the ducks were flying just off the water. A very high percentage of time this is what happens,...you shoot behind the target. What happens when you do it right, you swing smoothly, not just jerk up the gun fast to your cheek, is you mount the gun with the barrel point near the flying target. This prevents having to CHACE to bird with the barrel. That greatly increases your chances of shooting behind the target. It is virtually mount, and fire...little chance to look down the barrel, "checking to see if you are on target", and fire. Basically this is a lot like instinctive shooting where the gunner raises the gun, and fires, and can hit a small target as if they are a specially gifted person. No they are not. They practice for sure, but the have trained themselves to focus on the target, know where the barrel has properly been raised through practice, and then they trust their instincts.

                Comment


                • #9
                  This might explain why I'm tagging them with the second shots but not the first ones. Indeed, it is the narrow window of opportunity when I excel. Didn't do so hot today. Seven shots and one goose. That's the worst this year. In my defense I put the major smackdown on two that just wouldn't drop. Went to the slough and bagged two nice mallards in three shots. Second one was blown up very badly, unfortunately. I hate that.

                  The really big flocks passed me over though a couple gave things a look. If I'd let any live ones sit down earlier I'd probably had a couple hundred on my deeks. That's not very challenging shooting. I prefer the pairs and small families which I was shooting at mostly today. I'll go out for the evening shift and try some snap shooting and see if it makes a difference. I'm sure it will. This is kinda bugging me because I often bat a thousand and this year I'm taking three shells per bird most days. That darned 870 is not cycling worth a damn. Again. Really throws me off when I have to dig a shell out or refill an empty chamber. I think that gun may be worn out. Wouldn't surprise me. It's been working overtime almost every year since 1968.

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Yes it is, and the same thing that happens to me. Far and away, my best shot is the 2nd shot. I generally miss with the first shot, and have asked myself why? That 2nd one is remount, move the barrel, and shoot, and down comes the bird. I also think as I have gotten older my eyes, depth perception, focus are not the same. I tend to slow down right before the trigger pull, and check my line of sight. That results in an initial miss. I then go out to the trap club with the intension of smooth mount, focus on the target, and rely on my subcontious to determine when to shoot. Then in the field the problem that you have had crops up again.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      99explorer, I'm pretty sure it's against the law to shoot at gamebirds wih tracer ammo.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Nothing came to the deeks tonight. The flocks have found a new field. It was a beautiful evening though. Spectacular sunset.

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          May many flooks of ducks and geese pass by your sunset.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            A simple cross piece inside the top decoy in the nested half dozen helps hold them in the "inflated" rather than collapsed position while stored. I used a chunk of dowelling cut the desired length with two brass brads nailed in the ends to slip into the two T-stake edge holes I drilled in each of the shells. Also makes a nice carrying handle! The decoys have now taken proper shape to the point where I can sleive each one in kitchen trash bag to prevent paint scratches. Except, of course, the top/first decoy with the cross brace inside it.

                            There is a trick to nesting these new deeks. Hold the stack between knees, grab next decoy on each side and slip it over THE BOTTOM of the stack NOSE FIRST. DO NOT attempt to nest them from the top down. Doesn't work. Only nest a half dozen together. This should have all been part of an instruction manual (but none in the box!).

                            Another gripe I discovered today is the heads are WHITE plastic painted black. The old style had BLACK plastic heads with white cheek patches painted on (and were MUCH easier to pop on and off the shell!). I'm already seeing the white plastic showing through the black paint on these new heads.

                            Gad, I don't know who they have down there at that factory in the R&D department and quality control but they sure shouldn't be very proud of those employees! I had to cut off a whole lot of mold excess inside the shells today so the crap doesn't scrape the paint off the shells nested above them. Some of the heads were a real mess in that regard. A lot of overspray evident on the heads in particular. Almost every one of the post stakes was warped to the point of being almost useless. The plant inspector should have made sure those went straight in the trash! Just a lot of sloppy stuff and very poor design. I wanted to "buy American" (even though I'm not one anymore) but I'm not sure I'll make the effort next time.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              What the ...? Why did that wind up getting posted here? Never had that happen before. Sorry.

                              Comment

                              Welcome!

                              Collapse

                              Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                              If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                              And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                              Right Rail 1

                              Collapse

                              Top Active Users

                              Collapse

                              There are no top active users.

                              Right Rail 2

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Right Rail 3

                              Collapse

                              Footer Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X