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im sort of a rookie when it comes to turkey hunting. in new york state what do you look for when you are trying to find a good s

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  • im sort of a rookie when it comes to turkey hunting. in new york state what do you look for when you are trying to find a good s

    im sort of a rookie when it comes to turkey hunting. in new york state what do you look for when you are trying to find a good spot to hunt turkeys?

  • #2
    To me, ideal eastern turkey habitat is a mix of mature hardwoods and open fields and pastures. Turkeys need trees to roost in, mast to eat, and openings -- either fields or hardwood flats and logging roads -- on which to strut.
    As you scout, learn where turkeys roost, and where they go in the morning to strut; then you have the choice of trying to call the bird off the roost, intercept it on its way to a strutting area, or staking out a flat or field.

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    • #3
      Turkeys

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      • #4
        Back NY, we used to have a lot of luck in the land surrounding the local landfills. Go to the dump, see if there are some good woods. I'm serious.

        I think it might have something to do with the grit and dust they desire to stay clean and grind up their food being plentiful there. Look for depressions they've been dusting themselves in.

        Semi-open terrain is best. Cover is good, but too much and you'll have barrier problems. Toms there are wimps about crossing hedgerows, thick stuff, etc.

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        • #5
          I do a lot of turkey hunting here in upstate NY.

          The turkeys here tend to be very finicky. Some places look like prime turkey habitat and you will never see a single bird. Other places don't look so great and have flocks there every morning like clockwork.

          Turkeys around here are creatures of habit, much more so than the deer. Doing a lot of scouting is your best bet.

          If scouting isn't working out for you:
          Upstate birds like to roost in evergreen trees and then fly down into an open field in the morning. Then they work their way back into the hardwoods during the day (especially oaks and walnuts). Find a spot where those three factors come together and you'll have a pretty good shot.

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          • #6
            Agreed with ken.mcloud answer above and A + 1 for you sir!!!

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