Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Based on several years' observation and purely unscientific data my son, my friend, and I believe that we wound more pheasants w

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Based on several years' observation and purely unscientific data my son, my friend, and I believe that we wound more pheasants w

    Based on several years' observation and purely unscientific data my son, my friend, and I believe that we wound more pheasants with 20 gauges than 12 gauges. This past Sunday afternoon by actual head count of 17 pheasant killed, 9 roosters dropped dead from 12's while only 3 from twenties with 1 wounded by a twelve and 4 by twenties. Loads were roughly equivalent. Our dogs caught all the wounded birds. Anyone else notice this deficiency?

  • #2
    What you’re doing is Scientific; it’s called “cause and effect”!

    Comment


    • #3
      I haven't noticed. In the last couple of years I have shot just as many with a 20 as I have with a 12.

      Comment


      • #4
        Well that should be something that can be naturally assumed.

        Nate

        Comment


        • #5
          ish, boy you do have a dilema there. I wish we here in Mo. had that problem. But seriously I've always found a twenty to hit as hard as a twelve just not as many pellets.

          Comment


          • #6
            Jim in Mo I think what you said is exactly what is happening. We're not putting as many pellets in the roosters from a twenty hence the bird hits the ground alive. The pattern from the twelve is superior causing greater pellet density and more hits. This is confirmed when we pull the breasts but we don't closely examine any other portions of the dead birds. Nevertheless the light weight of the 20 gauge gun and shells certainly makes them very appealing especially as the day draws to an end and it is a mile or two back to the truck. Uphill.

            Comment


            • #7
              Look at the size of a 12 ga versus a 20 ga shell. The 12 ga allows more pellets and more gun powder. The 12 ga should have a superior pattern. The biggest pro for a 20 ga shell is a lighter gun to carry thru the fields and a lesser recoil.Make sense?

              Comment


              • #8
                I use a 16ga and my wife and daughter use 20's and we do fine personally never seen a major difference, but my wifes little brother could cripple Pheasants all day with a 10ga really don't think it makes a difference in the end just a fluke or maybe a range issue of goiung past 25-30 yards w/20 move up to 3in 4's just follow the standards smaller ga, longer range higher power shells and larger shot. for what it's worth anyway if you disagree feel free to take it up with wifey and good luck that woman does things I still don't believe w/ a 20 Goose over water need I say more?

                Comment


                • #9
                  16 gauges are the perfect solution. Or, shoot straighter.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've noticed it at the trap range, but I had my best dove shoot ever with a 20 gauge. It's about shot density and uniformity. Get your forcing cones lengthened and don't shoot at anything farther than 25 yards. You will change your opinion.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Agreed with blackdawgz answer above and A + 1 for you sir!!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        When by myself with the dog, I use the 20 gauge. When with a group I prefer the 12 gauge.

                        Comment

                        Welcome!

                        Collapse

                        Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                        If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                        And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                        Right Rail 1

                        Collapse

                        Top Active Users

                        Collapse

                        There are no top active users.

                        Right Rail 2

                        Collapse

                        Latest Topics

                        Collapse

                        Right Rail 3

                        Collapse

                        Footer Ad

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X