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  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Here is a video of 13" penetration in model clay. I am impressed. The feature I like is the belt centers the bullet in the chamber getting it off to a great start in the barrel.
    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q...tail&FORM=VIRE

    Leave a comment:


  • Ernie
    replied
    Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post

    Very interesting jimbo. I was not aware of this bullet. I could easily see it working on a 9mm at 35,000 PSI max pressure. I suspect that 60,000 PSI or higher pressure of a rifle bullet just might not work with the polymer. The GS Custom concept would work though with just one raised ring at the back. Since the rifle bullets are typically longer though, it makes sense to add additional rings down the length of the bearing surface like GS Custom does.
    Hammer's work very good. They are more of a typical range to mid-range bullet for hunting big game though. They need speed to work better and their BC's aren't great

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
    I am using a different kind of bullet in my 9mm Remington pistol...
    Very interesting jimbo. I was not aware of this bullet. I could easily see it working on a 9mm at 35,000 PSI max pressure. I suspect that 60,000 PSI or higher pressure of a rifle bullet just might not work with the polymer. The GS Custom concept would work though with just one raised ring at the back. Since the rifle bullets are typically longer though, it makes sense to add additional rings down the length of the bearing surface like GS Custom does.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    I am using a different kind of bullet in my 9mm Remington pistol. It is Remington's 'Black Belt'. The rear of the bullet is a belt like a 'o' ring around the base. This helps center the bullet in the chamber and line up with the barrel, form a good gas seal and helps scrub off copper residue. Must be some kind of high temp polymer as it does not leave any residue itself. I am sold on the concept. Maybe a ammo Co. could try something like that on rifle bullets. Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
    Why do some Hammer bullets have 3 or 4 groves on the side and others have twice as many?
    Barnes discovered shortly after they began making monolithic bullets that copper fouling can kill accuracy. Copper fouling builds up way faster in monolithic bullets than it does in jacketed lead bullets. Barnes proved early in the game that engraved rings around the outside of the bullet significantly reduce copper fouling. Since that time, monolithic bullet makers have been following that strategy.

    GS Customs Bullets take their bullet design a big step further. They reduce the bullet's overall diameter to the groove diameter of the bore and raise several copper rings down the length of the bullet to make contact with the rifling. That bullet succeeds in producing minimal copper fouling while enabling significantly higher velocities at the same time, due to reduced bore friction. My testing of their 291g .375 bullet in my .375 H&H allowed over 200 fps higher velocity and phenomenal long range accuracy.

    My buddy and I just inspected his 375 CheyTac extra long range rifle's bore yesterday after over 300 rounds of Hammers and Hornady A-Tips. The first half of the bore contained several thousandths of an inch of ceramic-like baked carbon covered by several thousandths of an inch of copper. The copper was thick and solid on both the riffling and in the grooves. It took three passes of SemiChrome paste to remove all this and get down to solid steel bore.

    All of this severe copper fouling is why Barnes originally developed their CR-10 copper solvent. Now there are many brands of copper solvent but if you shoot these big monolithic bullets, be sure to clean copper after every use to maintain accuracy.
    Last edited by DakotaMan; 05-23-2022, 01:35 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • WA Mtnhunter
    replied
    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
    Why do some Hammer bullets have 3 or 4 groves on the side and others have twice as many?
    Various Barnes bullets have different number and spacing of grooves. I imagine the Hammer and other coppers do for the same reasons: pressure relief, BC, bore riding considerations, accuracy, etc. I can’t see any improvement in terminal performance over Barnes TTSX and LRX of similar weights. I haven’t used the TSX on game enough to quantify, but they shot great in my .30-06. I can’t speak to the Federal and Winchester flavors of copper bullets.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ernie
    replied
    Bullets have different design purposes.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Why do some Hammer bullets have 3 or 4 groves on the side and others have twice as many?

    Leave a comment:


  • fitch270
    replied
    Originally posted by Ernie View Post
    Roll your own and the cost isn't so prohibitive, especially when hunting. Their hunting bullets are more designed out to mid-range distances. They work better with more speed.
    I first heard about these when I started handloading just before components started getting scarce. At the time I wasn’t seeing much in the way of load data so I didn’t give them much consideration. Figured it would be better to start out with well known info from both safety and cost considerations (ie load development). I’ve kept them in the back of my mind though in case NY ends up going lead free. The price isn’t far out of line with other premium mono bullets, which kinda makes the factory offerings a head scratcher price wise. I haven’t yet read about a monolithic bullet that didn’t like speed 😎.


    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    fitch270 is right, Joe Schmoe with a home mortgage, a car payment, three kids and an hourly 9 to 5 that sits down before each payday to work up a budget with the wife and scrimps and saves every year for a deer lease or a hunting trip, clothing for kids and wife, fuel and home maintenance; probably won't look twice at $180/box ammo, regardless of how good the bullets are.
    .....not that they may not be worth it, they're just not realistic.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ernie
    replied
    Roll your own and the cost isn't so prohibitive, especially when hunting. Their hunting bullets are more designed out to mid-range distances. They work better with more speed.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Long range competitors and hunters , 500yds +, speak highly of the hammers so must be paying the price.

    Leave a comment:


  • fitch270
    replied
    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
    $9 I would guess are for the large calibers - safari grade. Regular .300WbyMag probably list in the $65 a box range. I have bought some for $40 a box which is equivalent or lower to other premium brands.
    Look at the photo I posted, it’s from Weatherby’s website and shows the price of $179.00 when you choose the 170gr Hammers in 300 Weatherby.

    I’m aware of the bullets. Intriguing but not necessary for the type of hunting I do.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Fitch, the new 'Hammer' bullet line is almost hand made/turned. Competitors and Hunters alike can not say enough about their product line.
    Here is the Weatherby Ammo list with list prices.
    https://weatherby.com/ammunition/cartridges/

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    $9 I would guess are for the large calibers - safari grade. Regular .300WbyMag probably list in the $65 a box range. I have bought some for $40 a box which is equivalent or lower to other premium brands.

    Leave a comment:

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