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If your not going to eat it , why would you shoot a animal? isnt it like throughing a sucker punch at someone that didnt expect

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  • #16
    i shoot deer and i eat it. i've shot pheasant and dove and ate it. i shoot turkey and i don't personally eat it. but my family does. i really don't much like turkey. but others in the family do.

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    • #17
      Ken.mcloud
      My friends who are trophy hunters are all meat eaters and use everything that they shoot. I didn't answer the question properly and I can understand your frustration with my poor choice of words. You are, however, wrong in your assumption that as hunters we should not stick together. Every hunting opportunity that we have available to us today is because as outdoorsmen we have stayed together and fought for that particular part of our heritage. And finally, simply for my own benefit, "the yacht club"! I am a carpenter. I enjoy your postings. Good hunting.

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      • #18
        huntcamp
        You said it all very well. We stay with the blood trail until there is no chance that we can pick up a trace again, and then go to get the neighbor and her little dog. This little lap dog has a pretty impressive record. I have never found a deer killed just for it's antlers and left. I would be beyond sick.

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        • #19
          i got no problems killing beaver that are plugging culverts , or a coyote or fox, or coon killing my pets or chickens . in fact i can do it with a smile on my face . if your killing a game animal just for the hell of it or it rack and leaving its meat to rot . in my opinion you should suffer the same fate as the animal you wasted.

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          • #20
            I'm with part of what ken.mcloud posted. I don't agree with some of the antics of "fellow hunters" and there are more than a few hunters that engage in borderline poaching, leaving trash, road hunting, wasting game, and you name it.

            Just because a POS hoodlum is "hunting" doesn't make him or her an ethical sportsman that I want to stick together with.

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            • #21
              I agree with the ethical issues of using what we take for the most part. The exception that readily comes to mind are the groundhogs that destroy hayfields and devour gardens. I understand they're not bad on the table but usually the .220 Swift doesn't leave much to skin.

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              • #22
                My big exception to the rule is woodchucks. I put down 2 last week that had dropped the pad in my garage due to their digging under it. Incredible amount of damage, and really had to get rid of without killing.

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                • #23
                  wA Mtnhunt
                  I know what your talking about. There is always someone in every activity that has to muck it up for the rest. There will always be the group that has to straddle the line between legal and illegal and there will always be the guy that "huntcamp" points out that will cut the antlers from a deer and walk away. We can't change them; we've been trying to do just that thing for years. What I still feel is the right course of action is to stand together to make it hard for this type of person to continue to operate.

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                  • #24
                    Some such as coyote for predator control, some ground squirrels to control varmint populations that can cause property-animal-road damage, some such as cats for pelts and hides.......maybe a couple just looked at me wrong and didn't seem to respect my authority.....all jokes aside, killing isn't hunting, and hunting isn't killing....not to be confused with one another.....

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                    • #25
                      Rats, snakes, bear, bob cats, wild hogs, wild dogs skunks, possoms, and armerdillo's too name a few. I guess you could eat all these animals. At one time in our area, if you had a large animal like a bear breaking into your chicken house or vandilising your property. You would call the Sheriff and he would say soot it. Problem solved. Now you can't even shoot a stray cat with out a six year jail sentence. We have a serious problem with wild hogs, they are fine to soot and leave lay for now. I would eat every one if they would fit my freezer. The thing is people have a problem understanding what country living is all about. Alot of these law makers and activist live in big citys and have no understanding of how a Skunk smells after it finds its why under your house at knight. "Thats fun and it lasts for day's, even after you get rid of the problem."

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                      • #26
                        Many years ago I found a large buck with his antlers cut off on Ft. Benning GA. I had hunted this deer for 2 years. Really was disgusted until a week later ran into the hunter that admitted shooting the buck. The man shot the buck just before the end of shooting hours and he ran over 150 yds into very dense brush before falling. He could not find the deer until the next morning and by that time he was bloated and already stinking when the hunter cut into him for gutting. So the guy cut off the BIG antlers and left the rest for the critters to eat.
                        That said about 5 years ago while hunting near Olsberg KS I spotted a large buck laying in a bare field near a gravel road with nothing but antlers cut off. He had been shot.
                        If you go to my profile (click my username) and look at photos there is a pic of a Kansas game warden holding a set of B&C whitetail antlers from a buck shot at night with a $2,000 nightscope on a BAR. They caught that SOB and had his gun on display at the Kansas Bowhunter's convention.
                        Two years ago I found a large buck with antlers sawed off near a field and there was truck tracks nearby. The landowner told me it was a roadkill that proved to be unfit to eat. F&G had given him a salvage tag for it. He cut off the nice antlers and dumped the carcass for the critters.
                        What I'm saying is each situation is different and you usually never know what really happened for that buck to get there.
                        Many times I have found dead deer. Both for myself and others while hunting and also just finding a carcass while in the woods. Bleeding from a wound causes great thirst. Often they go to water and sometimes even die in a creek or pond. While tracking a wounded deer when all else fails I always go to every nearby source of water to check for the animal. Sometimes it works sometimes it doesn't. There is also a photo of a 10 pt bucks skeleton my dog found last Spring while shed hunting.

                        I always have a bloodlight in my truck. Last fall it saved a large doe for a kid when we used it to find his deer after darkness fell. It was the boy's first deer and he was very happy when I tracked down his deer for him. The shot hit a little too far back taking out the liver but not the lungs.

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                        • #27
                          When you've invested a fair amount of perspiration, work and $$$ into fuel, seed, and maintenance, your intention is to grow a crop...not to feed the creatures that are devouring the seeds you've just planted or the seedlings that are just starting to sprout. Much of my shooting is pest control, and I admittedly don't eat what I shoot. In terms of deer and other game animals, it is unquestionably wasteful not to eat them or donate the venison to folks that would appreciate it.

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                          • #28
                            With an exception of the bobcats, yotes, and porcupines I've shot, I eat almost everything.

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                            • #29
                              If you kill it you eat it, unless you are going to give it to someone else to eat. Of course there are a few animals mentioned above that I can see an argument for killing and not eating.

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                              • #30
                                Is it wrong that I just want to kill a deer or any animal for that matter, just for fun? I have no interest in eating the meat or keeping the head for a trophy. Well, maybe if it is a bear or mountain lion or something.

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