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I shot at ny first hog the otther day and thought i seen it hit the ground before running off. When i went to look for blood i c

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  • I shot at ny first hog the otther day and thought i seen it hit the ground before running off. When i went to look for blood i c

    I shot at ny first hog the otther day and thought i seen it hit the ground before running off. When i went to look for blood i couldn't find any and yesterday i heard higs dont bleed much unless you shoot them in the neck or head because of fat. Is it true

  • #2
    For whatever reason, wounded hogs don't bleed much. Most hunters fail to kill hogs cleanly because they aim for a large kill zone usually presented by deer.
    The kill zone on a hog is smaller, and situated further forward and lower on the body, just about where the front leg joins the torso. The gut area is larger and more easily hit by an errant shot that is just a bit too far back.
    A forward but slightly high shot can take out the lungs or spine, so the height of the POI is not as critical.
    I remember a hog that I killed with a slightly high forward shot that pulled about a foot of lung tissue out through the exit hole.

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    • #3
      Yes,In most cases there Body Fats and internal parts will fill the Entrance & Exit Wound.Here in Florida the weapon of choice for HOGs a 12Ga/20Ga shotgun with a Slug Bbl with Sights or Scope and Brenneke/Ko Slugs or Remington Copper/Sabot Slugs, now if that don't put it down it will leave a blood-trail a Blind man can spot.

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      • #4
        Punch a big enough hole in a pig, he'll bleed on the ground just like any other animal.
        With a properly applied .30-30, 6.8mm or .270, I've never had a problem recovering one. With ferals, even if I lose one, I'm not too concerned. I'd really like to see them eradicated, but we all know THAT will never happen!

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        • #5
          While I'm at it, lots of folks listen to lots if "crap-o-la" about feral hofs.

          Yes! They're tough! But they AIN'T bullet proof!
          From personal experience, I am convinced ferals are spookier than deer.
          An adult feral hog DOES have a "shield" across their shoulders. It's tough a$$ hide an inch or so thick that can/will stop arrows and small, frangible bullets.
          Ive been "rushed" many times by trapped pigs.
          I've NEVER been "charged" by a free ranging feral.
          Yes! Get between a sow and her piglets and you best be prepared for bad weather! LOL!
          Corner ANY crippled animal and they can be a problem. Pig, deer, antelope, etc...!
          No! I'm not claiming pigs "WILL NOT" charge!
          Any pig over about 20 pounds on the hoof, I won't dress out.
          I've eaten hogs up to 250/300 pounds. Properly cared for, they are good eating.I just ddon't like the big ones.
          All the "Hogzilla" hype is just that! Hype!

          I'll get off my soapbox now. I'm not asking for argument or sympathy. Jyst my own observations and feelings. A good friend went with me to get a pig a guy gave me. I head shot the 250 pounder with a .22LR and my friend laughed.
          Later, he told me he'd been lied to apparently.
          "Why?", I asked.
          "I was told if you weren't shooting at least a 7 mag, you can't kill a hog!"

          I'm just trying to dispel "some" of the rumor!

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          • #6
            While I'm at it, lots of folks listen to lots if "crap-o-la" about feral hofs.

            Yes! They're tough! But they AIN'T bullet proof!
            From personal experience, I am convinced ferals are spookier than deer.
            An adult feral hog DOES have a "shield" across their shoulders. It's tough a$$ hide an inch or so thick that can/will stop arrows and small, frangible bullets.
            Ive been "rushed" many times by trapped pigs.
            I've NEVER been "charged" by a free ranging feral.
            Yes! Get between a sow and her piglets and you best be prepared for bad weather! LOL!
            Corner ANY crippled animal and they can be a problem. Pig, deer, antelope, etc...!
            No! I'm not claiming pigs "WILL NOT" charge!
            Any pig over about 20 pounds on the hoof, I won't dress out.
            I've eaten hogs up to 250/300 pounds. Properly cared for, they are good eating.I just ddon't like the big ones.
            All the "Hogzilla" hype is just that! Hype!

            I'll get off my soapbox now. I'm not asking for argument or sympathy. Jyst my own observations and feelings. A good friend went with me to get a pig a guy gave me. I head shot the 250 pounder with a .22LR and my friend laughed.
            Later, he told me he'd been lied to apparently.
            "Why?", I asked.
            "I was told if you weren't shooting at least a 7 mag, you can't kill a hog!"

            I'm just trying to dispel "some" of the rumor!

            Comment


            • #7
              A 170 gr. .30-30 right behind the shoulder will make them bleed plenty, but they run till they bleed out and die.
              A 250 gr. Winchester right between the eyes stops them RFN.
              A 7mm mag is highly effective.
              A .22 LR between the ear and eye works as well as anything.

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              • #8
                A factory 117 grain Hornady round nose softpoint from a .257 Weatherby Mag. in the high shoulder will put one down in a heart beat. It didn't run and I didn't even see it kick. It was about 90 yards and when I got to it , it was grave yard dead. It was a 125 pound boar. Some of the best pork chops that I have ever eaten. People told me that boars weren't good to eat but this one must have been an exception because the meat was delicious.

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                • #9
                  Only good feral hog is a dead one. This probably is and made a great meal for the rest of them.

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                  • #10
                    It's true, they don't usually bleed as much as deer. My experience with boars has been a little different than FirstBubba's. I know he hunts them much more than I do and I believe him for sure. But I believe their behavior is erratic. Some charge, some run. Like a lion, if they are wounded or cornered, they are more likely to charge. My experience comes from stalking them on the ground. I've never baited them or sniped them from a distance out of a tree stand.

                    I've had three of seven boars around 350 pounds charge. One of them was totally unprovoked and he could have run off easily. We saw him about 200 yards away while driving down a logging trail. As we jumped out go after him, he charged at about 40 mph, growling and baring tusks all the way.

                    He took a 12 gauge slug under the chin at 12 yards from a courageous 12 year old young man and slid right up to our feet. I've also seen my buddy's .357 slug stopped before entering the shield from 20 yards or so. I've also put multiple 240g .44 caliber bullets through hog's chest without seeing any visible sign of impact. They can take off or charge like a lightening bolt.

                    I've had one frontal shot in a charge hit between the eyes and ricochet off the skull. I'm not using a .22LR unless I'm safely tucked up in a tree stand. They won't help much in a head on charge. I won't even use a .44 Mag anymore after nearly losing my life to one with three of my bullet holes through him. Even the one through his heart did not make him flinch. It took him 20 seconds of growling after that one before he hit the deck.

                    You can certainly kill a lion or a bull moose with a .22 LR if you get a good shot. Getting a good shot isn't always attainable if you hunt hogs on foot. If you hunt over bait from the comfort of a tree stand, you won't get charged once in a lifetime.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      DakotaMan-
                      Should have specified that the .22 LR was when the hogs were trapped. I would never hunt free ranging hogs with anything less than a .30-30.

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                      • #12
                        In my experience for a true broadside shot you have to hit almost right on the shoulder to hit vitals. Like 99 said, forward and higher than you'd expect. A slightly quartering away shot is much more desirable here. Actually, on these critters I don't mind going for a head shot. I know, it's "taboo", but you can usually get close enough and the head seems to be a larger target than the vitals...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          CRM3006, thanks for clarifying that. I just wouldn't want novice hog hunters to get the wrong idea and hit the fields with a 22LR on the ground. With a standing still hog in a trap or from a tree stand, they work fine if you take a brain shot. My best to you and happy hog hunting.

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                          • #14
                            One of the big "sports" in my area (and I've seen it elsewhere on TV!) is capturing ferals alive!
                            They run them with dogs until the hog "trees". With the dogs harrying the pug, the "hunter" slips behind the hog and grabs a back leg and flips it onto it's back. In that position, the hog is helpless and can be trussed (hog tied?) and taken alive.

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                            • #15
                              I use my 270 and aim for the back edge of the shoulder and only shoot broadside shots and they drop on the spot every time. Sure, I lose some meat but the hogs never run. Head shots would be best but it's all about personal preference.

                              I have seen a couple hogs gut shot or wounded and they definitely bleed less than a deer. Agree with everything FirstBubba pointed out earlier.

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