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can you recommend a good bipod for coyote hunting? it would be for my savage axis, and I would like the legs to extend so I coul

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  • Landon Nelson
    replied
    I use a caldwell bipod for my brwning 30/06 and im pretty happy with it. I just wish i wouldve gotten the next size up.

    Leave a comment:


  • jay
    replied
    Harris bipods are hard to beat if you want to install on the rifle. I like tripods much better than the monopod and bipods. I use the tripod by bog pod, the one with the red foam grips. I would love to have the ones made from carbon fiber for the weight but can't justify the cost. Tripods will give you a better rest, three anchor points are better than one or two. Wool is your best friend in cold weather. For extreme cold you are better off with mittens that have an inner glove liner that you can fold back the mitten. Mittens keep your hands much warmer than gloves. A good pac boot should keep your feet long enough for a coyote set before you move on and rewarming your feet.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    Forgot to mention, that if you are walking a lot in snow, half chaps (like Gaitors) really help to keep your pants dry right above your boots.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    Boots:
    It seems we all have our unique tolerance for temperature as we get accustomed to it. For boots I have always worn 800 Thinsulate boots, rubber soles and good tread most of the time when temps are going to be in that range. I can walk all day in them, yet can sit in one spot for hours without freezing my feet. There are higher levels of insulation and I do have another pair of those but rarely wear them because my feet get hot walking.

    I just put in 10 days hunting on a mountain in the Montana Rockies with snow and temps from -5 to 34 degrees. I slept in a flimsy tent but hiked/hunted about 18 hours a day with no trouble. They allowed me to climb and hike up and down, stay steady on ice and frozen shale and were waterproof for falling through those shallow frozen streambeds.

    Gloves: I like to use light well lined soft leather gloves most of the time but have others too. I use white or woodland wool camo gloves for varminting and bow hunting. I use Thinsulate gloves inside of elbow length rubber gloves for trapping on the frozen water. Especially if temps will dip to -25 or worse with high winds (where frostbite hits your wrists if you wear just normal gloves and a dip in the water freezes gloves solid before you can shake the water off). I carry hand warmer packets with me. If my hands do get cold in really cold weather or I've had to take my gloves off (e.g. field dressing) I can quickly get them warm.

    Leave a comment:


  • davycrockettfv
    replied
    I just have a Blackhawk! sportster on my Axis. I have the 9-13 inch one, but would actually prefer the next size up so I can use it when in a sitting position. For prone I can always use my pack. Easy to adjust and attach, and not expensive.

    Leave a comment:


  • davycrockettfv
    replied
    I just have a Blackhawk! sportster on my Axis. I have the 9-13 inch one, but would actually prefer the next size up so I can use it when in a sitting position. For prone I can always use my pack. Easy to adjust and attach, and not expensive.

    Leave a comment:


  • .30-06Hunter
    replied
    Harris is the only one I would buy. Mine is an older one with extendable legs but they don't pivot. Get one that does to compensate for uneven ground.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    For an attached bipod, the Harris bipod is the gold standard. I rarely use it for fox and coyote hunting though because it makes your rifle heavier and more difficult to carry. I will pop a 6-9" Harris bipod on if I'm sneaking into position for a very long range shot and have the terrain to do it. The shorter bipod is more stable for long shots.

    If you are going to be calling coyotes (where they approach from any direction) or shooting from a sitting position, I highly recommend the Primos Trigger Stick with two legs. It carries easily, extends to the right height instantly and allows you to carry and swing your rifle normally as you move around.

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    It's hard to imagine there is a bipod on the market better than "Harris"! Simple. Easy to install and adjust!

    Leave a comment:


  • 1Browning2
    replied
    I have a Caldwell Bipod on one of my rifles. It works well. The bipod will level itself out on even surface with the pivioting function. It functions fairly smooth. One downside is when the legs extend all the way out it will make a loud click.

    I also have a Primos Trigger Stick that works well for sitting. Smooth action. Pull the trigger and the legs slide down. But its not an attachable bipod but definitely worth thinking about.

    Leave a comment:


  • Montana
    replied
    I use Hunter's Specialties quick shot sticks, works great for sitting shots. Insulated boots are must, taking into account insulation vs mobility. I typically go with 800 gram thinsulate boots. I wear wool shooting gloves, and keep them in my pockets.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    I just posted a thread a few pages back about hunting pheasants in minus thirty temps. But that kind of hunting involves moving all the time. You are into something that's a whole different ball of wax. A while back some guys had good things to say about the down booties you pull over your footwear. Might want to think about that. I would image a down muff thing for your hands would work very well too. Someone must make something like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • can you recommend a good bipod for coyote hunting? it would be for my savage axis, and I would like the legs to extend so I coul

    can you recommend a good bipod for coyote hunting? it would be for my savage axis, and I would like the legs to extend so I could shoot while sitting. also, what gloves and boots do you wear when the temperature is below 20 degrees?

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