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The state of New Jersey allows baiting during their black bear hunting season in December. The law states you must be a hundred

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  • Gary Devine
    replied
    Bioguy or the feeder must be hanging ten feet up from a heavy duty tree limb. I know bears are great tree climbers but it wouldn't be as easy to damage.

    You would need a tall step ladder hidden nearby in the bush to fill that feeder.
    Hey it is worth a try.

    Thank you all, you gave me some good tips.
    That is what Field and Stream is all about, Sportsmen helping Sportsmen.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bioguy01
    replied
    Longrifle - Good idea for deer...bad idea for bears. Bears destroy mechanical feeders. It's gotta be a pretty heavy duty feeder to survive a curious and hungry bear.

    Leave a comment:


  • Longrifle
    replied
    Use a mechanical timer feeder. Fill with a mix of dog food kibble/corn/sweet feed.

    Set it to go off an hour before dark. The bears will be running to it when they hear the sound.

    May also work if set to go off a half hour after daybreak. Animals are easily conditioned to timed feeders.

    Have a partner come in with you and then leave, because bears can't count.

    Use in conjunction with the stingy technique. Big greedy bear will let his greed override his caution.

    Leave a comment:


  • Treestand
    replied
    I have used 1 sterno can an 1 empty Soup Can 1 empty Coffee can Filled with Honey. on the Coffee Can make large holes, lite the Sterno and put it in side on the coffee can and the Soup can on top filled with Honey....It works every time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Devine
    replied
    Bioguy, also a point of information, you can't use rifles in the Garden State on any big game species.

    Hunters must use a shotgun slug barrel with copper slugs or a muzzle loader.
    No buckshot allowed on bears, either.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Devine
    replied
    Bioguy, I agree with you and the hundred yard rule is a stupid law.

    When New Jersey started up the black bear season in 2003 after a 33 year ban on bear hunting it was mandatory for all bear hunters to take a black bear safety course.

    The Fish and Wildlife instructor said you can sit and hunt inside your bait pile or hunt ten feet away.
    If you’re in a ground blind or tree stand the hundred yard distance law applies.

    You can thank the NJ Fish and Game Council for that brilliant hundred yard law.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bioguy01
    replied
    Gary D. - Good luck! I hope you connect and be sure to post pictures if you do!

    On a side note, there are some hunting laws that make absolutely no sense...requiring that a hunter be >100 yards from a bait pile is one of them. I suppose whomever made that law probably thought that if hunters were going to be allowed to hunt over bait, requiring them to be 100 yards away would give the bear a "sporting chance" at escape in the form of a possible missed shot. To me it makes more sense to require that the hunter be within 100 yards of the bait because at closer range the bear has the advantage in the form of a powerful nose that could detect the hunter well before the hunter was even aware that the bear was in the area. It would also give the bear a better chance to detect movement. Also, we owe it to the animals we hunt to make a clean and ethical shot. Although 100 yards is well within the effective range of most rifles, I dare say the effective range of most hunters is less than 100 yards.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Devine
    replied
    Chuckles, jhjimbo and phw, great stuff! Plus ones for everybody!

    Put out less bait and starve them out during the daylight hours. Great Idea!

    Those huge bears must leave a worn out trail down on the ground leading to my bait pile.
    Find where their coming from and ambush them a few hundred yards before the bait pile.
    Awesome!

    Wow, I love it! Now you guys have me all pumped up!
    I am going to start my bait pile this weekend two months early.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Devine
    replied
    Habben and Bioguy, thank you for the good suggestions.
    I agree moving the bait pile location to a near by thicket could give those bears a sense of security.

    My problem is the NJ game law and being a hundred yards away from the bait pile while hunting inside a tree stand.
    Those football field shots are harder to find inside a heavy thicket or near a swamp.

    So, I may have to hunt downwind, out in the open, down on the ground at twenty to thirty yards from my bait pile or even sit inside the bait pile locked and loaded.

    I am willing to try anything to out fox them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pray- hunt-work
    replied
    Gary- Unequivocally, with out a doubt, I assure you that both bioguy and chuckles are correct. Black bear in the fall will forage up to 20 hrs a day, to sleep all day means starvation and they know it. If they are not present by day, you have to back track them. Trail cameras are great for that. I will echo two previous techniques briefly, and add a third.

    1- Back track their movements. They are eating by day, if you want to shoot them by day, you can only do it where they eat. Bioguy described this well.

    2- "Stingy" baiting- they are greedy, agressive, dominant feeders. If there's one twinky on the table, the fat kid is there first and will be rude to get it. EVERY TIME. Chuckles described this well.

    3- I am a firm believer that big bears, smart bears, know you're there. We walk in to a bait in pairs, one goes to sit, the other baits the bait in the "stingy" method. When walking in, were not silent, even when filling the bait preseason. It's not to keep from spooking them, it's so that they get accustomed to hearing us enter and then being fed. When were hunting, were equally as loud, weather coming or going. They hear the "baiter" leaving and come for a stingy dinner. Best of luck to you, I'm sure you're using an appropriate bait or you wouldn't have pictures to prove it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pray- hunt-work
    replied
    Gary- Unequivocally, with out a doubt, I assure you that both bioguy and chuckles are correct. Black bear in the fall will forage up to 20 hrs a day, to sleep all day means starvation and they know it. If they are not present by day, you have to back track them. Trail cameras are great for that. I will echo two previous techniques briefly, and add a third.

    1- Back track their movements. They are eating by day, if you want to shoot them by day, you can only do it where they eat. Bioguy described this well.

    2- "Stingy" baiting- they are greedy, agressive, dominant feeders. If there's one twinky on the table, the fat kid is there first and will be rude to get it. EVERY TIME. Chuckles described this well.

    3- I am a firm believer that big bears, smart bears, know you're there. We walk in to a bait in pairs, one goes to sit, the other baits the bait in the "stingy" method. When walking in, were not silent, even when filling the bait preseason. It's not to keep from spooking them, it's so that they get accustomed to hearing us enter and then being fed. When were hunting, were equally as loud, weather coming or going. They hear the "baiter" leaving and come for a stingy dinner. Best of luck to you, I'm sure you're using an appropriate bait or you wouldn't have pictures to prove it.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Gary, if the clock is correct on the photo's you are missing them by several hours. Either find the path they take to come in - they probably come about the same way every day. And put another stand on that path. Or, like Chuckles says use the stingy style bait technique to get them to start coming in earlier.
    In N.Y. we knew where and when the bears were heading for food and would take a stand 1/2 hour before the end of legal hours. That was with rifles.
    Good luck.

    Leave a comment:


  • chuckles
    replied
    Here is one technique that we have tried with one success but it was the biggest bear taken in that area in 16yrs. We called it "stingy" baiting.
    Instead of giving the bears enough or more than they could eat in a night we only put out a small amount of bait the couple of nights before the season started.
    The theory is that with competition around the bears will get to the bait early so they get some food. A whopper bear that we had pictures of for two years came in 3 minutes before end of shooting light on the second night of the season. I know one bear does not constitute much proof but it was the only time in two years that bear came in when we could shoot. I read an article about coyote baiting that used this technique so we tried it with the bears. Seemed to work or at least worked on that bear and we did get more daylight shots on the other baits.
    Otherwise I would echo Bioguy and say try and find their hangout and set up on the trail to the bait. I would bet you cannot sneak up on them in the cover but if you can set up between them and the bait you might get a shot. Bears don't get big by making many mistakes.
    Good luck Gary. I only saw small bears this season so I am eating bear tag soup.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bioguy01
    replied
    Gary D. - Big bears in high hunting pressure areas don't get big by making it a habit of visiting bait piles during daylight hours (because they would be killed at a young age and never get old enough to get very big). In other words, these bears have been around the block, and they seem to know to avoid bait piles during daylight hours during hunting season. If you want to kill those bears, you need to find out where they are located during daylight hours (which is likely in the thickest, nastiest stuff within a reasonable walk in any direction from the bait pile), and go after them in those areas.


    I know we have discussed baiting techniques before and disagreed. Baiting animals, patterning them, and capturing them is what I do for a living, and I have done it up and down the east coast. My best advice is to trust your data (trail camera pictures), change your bait locations until you get daylight pictures consistently, and change your hunting tactics so until you find a combination that works best for you and your scenario. Baiting is an art, not a science. What works in some areas will not work in others, and there is no "magic bait" that makes animals come running in during daylight hours. Good luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • habben97
    replied
    you could try piling up brush and pine boughs in a large circle around the bait pile to make the bears feel more secure when eating. I am not a bear hunter but I know that deer feel more secure if there is a lot of cover around their food.

    Leave a comment:

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