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Well guys, there are often times that questions asked here are pretty specific and don't get rewarded with an answer as a result

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  • Alan Sedey
    replied
    If you're planning to use the gutless method in WY, be prepared for a lot more than you'll see in the u-tube videos. Here you're required to take the rib meat as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    PHW, I'm a rookie too and so looking forward to my first hunt, but have received much good advice from the gentlemen above if you can search for the answers they gave this Spring when I got my tag. WAM also provided the recommendation that I read the Don Laubach and Mark Henckle books and that was great advice. He also suggested I read the Colorado Web site that provides a great deal of info too. In these three books you will find most of what you need to understand elk, their habits, their signs, their migrations, hunting tactics, etc. Very good books that will get you up to speed quickly.

    Since you are new to the area, I would also suggest you read "Hunting High Country Mule Deer" by Mike Eastman. I've always hunted prairie muleys and hunting the high country is WAY different and could present a unique opportunity for you. You may have a chance at some real trophy bucks and you may enjoy that as much as elk hunting. When I was young I attended a show given by his dad Gordon Eastman and it remains one of the highlights of my life. These guys know wildlife!

    Best of luck to you!

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Chuckles, I knew you were joshing. I certainly would encourage anyone these days to go the aluminum pack frame route as a lot has changed since the flimsy Boy Scout versions of my youth. Military surplus ammo packboards will do the job but they are unnecessarily heavy by today's standards. I would only keep using mine because my dad's name is painted on it.

    Leave a comment:


  • 268bull
    replied
    I cut my eye teeth here in Oregon hunting Roosevelt's in 1978. Shot my first bull in 1979. Then there was a loooooong time before my next, but I believe Happy Myles has given you the best info. Elk are extremely tough and durable, and at times the physical demands, well, you'll start to ? yourself as to why your doing it. But if you learn from all those times, sucess will start to come your way. I don't have a drawer full of ivories, but I do have a couple of pill bottles filled up. And I wouldn't have missed any of it for the world!(I'd already been in the service and seen the world ) Best of luck to you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Woods Walker
    replied
    P-W-H Just a thought - since you have no experience with elk, have you considered hiring a guide for your first experience. It might save you a lot of time and headaches rather than learning the ropes the hard way. If you do not have the spare cash to hire a guide, maybe you could volunteer to go along with one of the local guides and help out - free labor can be a hard thing to turn down and with your open mind, you should be able to absorb a lot by watching and asking questions.....

    Leave a comment:


  • chuckles
    replied
    I was just joshing you about the aluminum OHH. I always appreciate your hard core approach even if I don't always do the same in my hunting.
    Lots of the old equipment was/is rugged which is why it is still around. I do think there have been some big strides in ergonomics and especially in materials. Pack straps being a perfectly good example.
    We used bungees and short lengths of rope that were prerigged for lashing quarters to the packs. It's not fun if your load is wiggling around on you. The shelf makes a big difference too.
    I hope the geese are flying your way!
    I whiffed on the bears this year but got to see a few. Archery deer has also been tough so far but it is still early yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • Happy Myles
    replied
    I thought of the surgical tubing one time while standing on my head in two feet of snow while attempting to get a drink from a small stream and an elk crashed away

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Thanks, Happy. Great tip on the surgical tubing! It will save me cleaning off slobbered up glasses every time I bend over to drink out of a spring. Heck, it may save me bending over altogether which is good news at my age (especially with a fifty pound pack on my back!).

    Chuckles, thirty years ago there were few aluminum frame packs that could stand up to the extreme weight of an elk quarter (a real one, not the gutless kind). Not only was the military surplus ammo packboard just about indestructible (except for the poor quality lacing used to attach canvas back support to the wooden pack frame), it was ideal for packing elk quarters. One simply laced the meat to the two rows of heavy hooks along each side of the packboard. As easy and quick as lacing up your boots. Attaching quarters to a regular tubular aluminum frame can be a bit more complicated. Here's what they look like: www.kpemig.de/US-Army-WWII-Packboard-Plywood-uncleaned_1

    If I was still hunting elk I'd probably change the shoulder straps and add a belly strap. I don't think anyone would laugh at me with that old thing. Certainly not after they had a chance to see it in action.

    Leave a comment:


  • Happy Myles
    replied
    Here is a funny tip. Elk hunting in tough, rough country, one must be careful of thirst and indeed dehydration. I always carry a small water bottle in case I cannot find a stream or some source. Often in high country the source may be hard to reach. A very small cup and and outstretched arm may do the trick. However, I also carry a small length of surgical tubing to use as a straw to tap small rivulets back in rock crevices. Yes I know of the dangers of mysterious parasites. Try to stay away from water in low flat country, and areas of known risk.

    Leave a comment:


  • Happy Myles
    replied
    Pardon the spelling and grammar errors, the print disappeared and I could not proof read.

    Leave a comment:


  • Happy Myles
    replied
    Lesson to be learned is to be consistently successful elk hunting you must be willing, and able to hunt hard, sometimes physically and painfully. It has worked for me and Ontario. I have a cigar box full of ivories to prove it. Kindest Regards

    Leave a comment:


  • Happy Myles
    replied
    Anyone who has followed Ontario's comments on elk hunting must realize being in good physical condition, having persistence, and a willingness to

    hunt, and stay in tough country are crucial to consistent elk hunting success. I was asked once at a seminar, hosted as I recall by Jim Zumbo, why i was successful year in year out. I do my research and hunt where there are elk. Then I stay with them. An important item is a rain suit,made of quiet,lined, camp material. At mid day I can get out of the wind, slip on the rain suit over my jacket and pants and take a nap, resting up for late afternoon and evening hunt. On occasion have spent some miserable nights huddled around a small fire so as not to waste time going and coming back from base camp to a good prospective area, relying on my afternoon nap to keep me going. Obviously weather plays a important part in this procedure. However one time as I was looking down at a dead elk I pulled out my small warer bottle and found it frozen solid.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Elk ivories are only on the upper jaw. They serve no function. It's a vestigial thing. Little musk deer in Korea had the same teeth but hang down beyond the lips like vampire fangs.

    Leave a comment:


  • 99explorer
    replied
    A little known fact about elk is that they have large canine teeth, known as ivories. Many years ago, elk were hunted for these teeth, often worn as a watch-fob on the chain dangling across a gentleman's vest.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pray- hunt-work
    replied
    Thanks guys, as dweeby as it may sound, I've literally noted all the details and they're much appreciated.

    A couple of details about our situation, were about 4 hrs south of the WY/MT line, from what I've heard most all the grizzlies in the state are up toward Yellowstone and points north. We did have a black bear get into one of the ranch families wall tent elk camp last week, he pretty well destroyed the place I guess. As for horses, we've 250 of em, I could run a pack string from here to town if I had a mind and packs and packing supplies are not of short order around here. I believe the .270 wsm may be handed toward the wife but I may also use it myself. Again, there are many many details Ive yet to thank you guys for. But you just might help me bag an elk with your suggestions.

    Leave a comment:

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