Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I want to get a rifle that is basically a super rugged, really accurate, "long range" or short range, all purpose hunting rifle.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Sarge01
    replied
    I had my pet to the range today with some loads and found another faster load for my 300WSM with Hornady 165 grain Interlock bullets. The best part is that one of the loads with RL-22 is a 3/4 inch load which makes me real happy. My longest shot in my WV deer woods where I hunt is 175 yards and this is quite acceptable. Most of my shots are at 100 yards. The more I shoot my Sako the more I appreciate it.

    Leave a comment:


  • 268bull
    replied
    You can discuss which rifle is best from now to infinity and never come to an agreement. This doesn't answer your ?, but I guess you keep shooting them all till you find the one which cut's, wraps and flash freezes as well. Excuse my sarcasm fellow's. I don't offer a magic answer, but I do believe you'll know it when you've discovered your rifle which suit's you best.I discovered mine with my .270 Remington.But I hunt locally where I live ( Oregon ) and hunting Roosevelt elk and blacktail's generally don't require distance shot's. At my age there's not enough time or energy left in me to hunt brown bears, cape buff. or other exotics. But if I did, I have every reason to believe my old .270, with good shot placement, would be up to the job. The only other rifle I would have considered would be the .30.06. It's a very versital rifle. Good luck to you in your search for your rifle!

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    You will probably be happy with the Savage. I personally don't like the sloppy feeling action on them however it is strong and actually moves to hold the case head perfectly every time. It also looks a little cheap with the Savage logo splashed on the bolt. The Accutrigger is very good. Its real benefit is that most are quite accurate and you can crank a new barrel on yourself to install a highly accurate premium barrel (e.g. Krieger, Shilen, Hart, Bartlien, etc.) if you want even more accuracy. You can also use multiple barrels so you can alter the cartridge you shoot from season to season.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Savage has been coming on strong in the last few years, especially since their Accu-trigger. They have a model, I am sure would meet your requirements.
    There are just so many out there to choose from, try to pick up different makes and models and when you pick up the one for you , you will know it.
    Good luck.

    Leave a comment:


  • Safado
    replied
    Sounds like you are looking for a .300 Weatherby in an Accumark especially since you handload. With a 26" barrel it won't be light but it will be accurate and will have an all weather composite stock to satisfy the rugged part of your request. I would have recommended 30-06 but you already have one and want flat shooting. You should also look into the .270 and 7mm Weatherby Magnums. If you don't handload I'd look at the .300 Win Mag. Weatherby's are the fastest flat shooting calibers period with a few exceptions.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    Sarge has an outstanding rifle there for your needs. His Sako A7 is a mighty fine rifle. It will cost more than the Remingtons but is a very fine rifle and well worth the extra cost if you can afford it. I used to favor the parent .300 Winny over the WSM case design but field experience is demonstrating that the WSM is actually a little more accurate and has slightly less recoil at the same bullet velocities. The short, fat WSM cartridge with the sharp shoulder angle provides an exceptionally consistent propellant burn from shot to shot and velocities that can exceed the parent cartridge.

    I've been shooting the .300 Dakota which is slightly larger in capacity but has a case contour similar to the WSM. It has been exceptionally accurate for me. That being said, I have several friends who shoot the .300 Win Mag and we all consider it a top performer in 1000 yard accuracy. As a matter of fact, it performs so well, I'm not sure I achieved much accuracy improvement going to the .300 Dakota.

    Sarge's Buckmaster is a good hunting scope but if you can afford the Nikon Monarch model, it will be even clearer. Take a look at them side by side. I've been very happy with my Monarch and will take it elk hunting next month. I also like the Vortex Viper for even better clarity and a wider field of view. Both are highly accurate and rugged.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sarge01
    replied
    I have a rifle that I think you described. I use a Sako A7 stainless in 300WSM with a Nikon Buckmaster 4X12X50 scope on it. Your choice of scope is up to you but the Nikon has served me extremely well on the rifle for years. My Sako is rugged and is super accurate and the 300WSM gives me the power and range I need for the animals that you listed. I reload so I can tailor my loads to the animal I hunt.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chewylouie
    replied
    Been doing some research, I was wondering about a savage hunting platform. It is a little cheaper and it sounds like a good platform. Any reasons I shouldn't?

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    Your highest long range accuracy will come from a relatively heavy barrel which reduces barrel torque/vibration and improves shot-to-shot consistency. This goal is at odds
    with your desire for ease of hunting where a lighter weight barrel is easier to carry. Personally, I have learned to carry a little heavier rifle for improved long range accuracy and to reduce the recoil of cartridges like the .300 Win Mag.

    For long range accuracy (beyond 400 yards) you will also want to acquire an exceptional barrel with a 100% aligned chamber. In the Rem 700 line you will pay more for one of these in such models as the Sendero or the VSS but they should be accurate for ranges out to 600 yards or so, maybe more. I do not consider 400 yards to be long range so .75-1.0 MOA accuracy is all that is needed (and a 30-06 is all that is needed). If you intend to shoot 1000 yard targets, .2 MOA or better will give you a much better chance. You will likely have to buy a custom barrel with a custom chamber cut to get that level of accuracy. Lothar Walther barrels are exceptional at 1000 yards and beyond but most premium barrels will work out to 1000 yards.

    The .300 Win is an excellent cartridge since you hand load. You can make it perform like a .308 or a top tier magnum based on your needs. This cartridge will allow you to target elk over 200 yards further than with the 30-06 if you so desire. The .300 WSM will perform equally well if you prefer that case. Remember you can shoot nice accurate very low drag Berger 215s for long range target/hunting applications or 110g smokin' varmint loads with very little recoil and lots of flat shooting speed. You can see a 110g grouping from my .300 Dakota on my profile pics... they are varmint killers out to about 500 yards or so. After that, the larger bullets perform better.

    Some relatively lower cost options are available as long as .5 MOA accuracy is OK (and that should be fine unless you are interested in competitive shooting). You might just get that from the average Weatherby Vanguard or Howa 1500 (same barrel/receiver) with tuned loads. You may also expect that from the Savage 111 long range rifles. A nice aspect of the Savage is that you can order a completely finished premium barrel and install it yourself to save money while getting premium accuracy.

    Regarding stocks, I am convinced that as long as the stock is glass/pillar bedded right, its composition is of little impact. On my long range rifle, I shoot a walnut stock I carved myself just to prove this point to many long range shooters (see profile). Manufacturers have been hyping fiberglass stocks for years so they can eliminate the cost of real wood but either will work fine as long as it is properly bedded and the barrel is free floated.

    After 40+ years of use in rain, sleet, dry dessert, high humidity, snow, temperatures from -25 to 110 degrees, it still shoots 3.5" five-shot groups at 1000 yards, normally beating $1000 stock investments from other shooters. If you need a stock, the Bell & Carlson with aluminum bedding blocks are a pretty good value for around $225 all in. You can pay a lot more for a stock but you won't get much better accuracy after you skim bed one of these stocks.

    Good luck with your decision... so many choices!

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    I am just tugging on your chain Dallas.

    Leave a comment:


  • Grassroots89
    replied
    [Blank]

    Leave a comment:


  • WA Mtnhunter
    replied
    I have never owned a .300 Win Mag, but it is a superb cartridge. After firing a .300 RUM at the range a few years ago, I decided that I could tolerate that level of recoil and acquired a .300 Weatherby which has most of the performance and not all the recoil of the RUM. Owing to the fact that most Weatherby rifles are heavier than most other rifles chambered in .300 Win Mag, felt recoil calculates to about the same even with a little more powder and velocity in the Roy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Happy Myles
    replied
    Forgot to mention other 300 Mags. I have many friends and associates, all sophisticated hunters and marksmen who swear by their 300 Weatherby Magnums. In my case, the one I had was just not as accurate as any of my three, 300 Win Mags using factory or hand loads. Sure it was just a quirk of my rifle. When I started shooting 300 Win Mags, sort of stopped using my 7mm Remington Mag even though it is a super rifle... The 300 Winchester Magnum has been my "go to " rifle. For a long time.

    Must confess, looking back on more than sixty five years hunting around the world, if I had stuck with a high quality 06, all that money spent on 300 magnums would have paid for a lot of hunting trips.... Kindest Regards

    Leave a comment:


  • Happy Myles
    replied
    Of all my rifles, which are quite a few, I am least happy with my two Remington Ultra Magnums. They are both by prominent gunmakers one with a fabulous walnut stock, the other synthetic, both have top grade barrels and Jewell triggers. Their vicious recoil is not rewarded by any special accuracy. Bare in mind I seriously use heavy recoil rifles from 375 up through 500 Jeffery.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Dallas,
    Check the profile pictures of the targets from my Remington 700 before you knock the F&S 'best rifle' winner.

    Q. does your beard itch? give me a break.

    Leave a comment:

Welcome!

Collapse

Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

Right Rail 1

Collapse

Top Active Users

Collapse

There are no top active users.

Right Rail 2

Collapse

Latest Topics

Collapse

Right Rail 3

Collapse

Footer Ad

Collapse
Working...
X