Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Do any of you guys use a GPS? Many hunters take a compass with them and others use topographical maps? Some Sportsmen are like b

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Do any of you guys use a GPS? Many hunters take a compass with them and others use topographical maps? Some Sportsmen are like b

    Do any of you guys use a GPS? Many hunters take a compass with them and others use topographical maps? Some Sportsmen are like bloodhounds they can walk in for miles and still make it back to the vehicle by observing landscapes. There nothing worst then getting lost in the wilderness.

  • #2
    When I was living in Colorado and would be out on DIY hunts I would always have a GPS marked with a few forrest road intersections, my camp location, and trailheads (if thats where I was hunting), and maybe a few marks along the way. Extra batteries were also a must. I would always carry a compass too. Also, before I left the house I would do a Google Earth search of the area I planned on hunting and I would print it off just so I could see major roads on it, in the event that I was totally screwed and needed to use the compass to get to the road. I never had to use the compass, and I only used the GPS once.

    Comment


    • #3
      I had a compass and got lost up in Maine wilderness.

      My brothers and I was parked on an old logging road.
      I walked in the woods at first light at 7am still hunting for two hours heading due north.
      I turned at 9am and still hunted for two hours heading due east.
      I turned again at 11am and walked three hours heading due south but there was no logging road.
      I turned again at 2pm and still hunted heading due west because I knew Golden Road was a large gravel road and west should bring me out on it.
      It was pitch black at 5pm and I was still in the woods.
      I turned on my flashlight just to check my compass then I turned it back off.
      There was a full moon out so I thanked God for that.
      I walked in the dark for two more hours and finally came out on Golden road.

      I found out later that the logging road that we were parked on was a dead end a mile down the road.
      That was why I couldn’t find it heading due south. A GPS would of guide me back to the vehicle.

      Comment


      • #4
        Out west I never used a map or compass. Never needed to. Here in Ontario it's a different matter. Too flat and dense. I finally broke down and started using a GPS some years back but it was stolen out of my vehicle and I haven't replaced it. Don't hunt moose anymore and definitely not needed for goose hunting. But they are very useful to keep in the vehicle in case I come upon a bad accident. Then I can give 911 the exact coordinates and they can relay it to medivac helicopter.

        Comment


        • #5
          I grew up spinning 300+ circles a day on the open ocean, sometimes in the thick of fog. Somehow I built an internal compass that always has me on the right track directionally. I own a GPS but RARELY use it. If I don't know an area I will always find a map to view before I head out. Google earth, as mentioned above is great. I bring a compass to be safe, but it is always "lost" in the bottom of my pack. If I look at a GPS it is to see how far I've gone, my headway speed, or my elevation. I don't think I've ever used it for direction. I often find myself making mental notes of different land marks, and not realizing I've cataloged them until my trip out of an area. The good lord didn't gift me with many worldly graces, but a good internal compass is one of my strong suits.

          Comment


          • #6
            Might I go back and deservedly capitalize LORD. I apologize.

            Comment


            • #7
              I always carry a GPS, compass, and several maps with different overlays. Satellite images might not always be accurate on just a google maps overlay, so I print out terrain features and try to get a topo map of the area.

              Comment


              • #8
                When i hunt out west I always have my garmin oregon gps. I have hutinggpsmaps SD card for the state I'm hunting. I always pin camp and areas I want to scout or hunt. It also helps greatly dealing with the private/public ground checkerboarding issues that you can run into out west. Hey, I'd rather have boots on the ground and learn the country that way but it is geographically next to impossible so I have to rely more on technology like gps systems and google earth.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I use all of the above when hunting big timber areas. I use maps to understand the area, intersecting roads, trails, rivers/creeks and visual reference points. I use the compass to check my direction periodically in dark timber where I have a tendency to walk in circles and where my GPS doesn't get a signal. I use the GPS to mark camp, kill locations, checkpoints, etc. I can use that to find things and return to a specific point. The only problem with using a GPS all the time is that I often can not get a signal in dark timber and deep canyons.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I use the Garmin Vista HCx in the Adirondacks as well as compass and maps. Started doing that when I fell asleep late one afternoon and woke up to pitch darkness. My bubble compass was of no help because I forgot the heading I took coming in. That got the adrenalin going 'till I calmed down and figured things out.
                    Don't use much in Ohio as there are roads everywhere.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I do exactly what Lostlure said.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A GPS is very handy in Africa to keep a record of animal locations. I took a SPOT with me to Cameroon thinking the prerecorded text message would be a simple way to keep my family informed as to my well being. It did not work there despite assurances to the contrary by the manufacturer

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I grew up learning how to use a compass, still carry one for backup. But spent most of my time in the wilderness not useing it and learned to trust the land and the markings that I would make mentaly through out the day. As Pray-Hunt-Work said I built in what I thought was a good internal compass. always served me really well. Got a GPS one year and thought that it would be a fun peice of gear to just have. Went out one day for deer and soon enough it turned dark on me and I had not even started back to camp. So I started heading back to camp. Although I was heading in the right direction and I would have made camp that night I pulled out my GPS, it was nice cause it gave me a direct line back to camp. so in the end was extramly nice to have. about two months later my lvoeing boxer decided that he would chew my GPS up. Although I could manage without one I went and bought another one to make sure that I had it for ease. I would suggest that people always carry a compass even if they have a GPS.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            i have on me always but i only tend to pull it out to mark good sign, big deer sightings, or places i want to spend more time in. When i moved out west i was really luck to have a mentor who drilled into me the importance of knowing where you are. he would ask me what direction the truck was and we would walk that way (he always new where the truck was despite the fact that i always did not) it was a great way to learn where the truck was fast (no one wants to walk through the arizona desert waring full camo in august more then they have to)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Be nice to have a 2 way communicator with a built in GPS + ERB, with a battery jumper and shop manual to fix the Jeep and ATV. A draw on the side for some cold MGD would be over the top.

                              Comment

                              Welcome!

                              Collapse

                              Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                              If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                              And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                              Right Rail 1

                              Collapse

                              Top Active Users

                              Collapse

                              There are no top active users.

                              Right Rail 2

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Right Rail 3

                              Collapse

                              Footer Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X