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I have a Black bear roaming around my yard regularly. I have young children so obviously this is a problem. I am an avid hunter,

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  • King Ghidora
    replied
    Those that think that a black bear just won't become aggressive and they automatically run when they see humans likely haven't lived with them very long. I've had them face me down from 30 yards away because I disturbed their adventure into my neighbors hog feed barrel. I have had them clack their teeth at me several times when I cook on the grill because they smell what I'm cooking and they want it. They came into the yard and ate my dog's food before I was aware they were around. There had been very few in the area for over 100 years. Now they are everywhere.

    I have seen my dog (a fiest) chase 2 bears up the hill. I've lost 2 cats to the bears too. I have made up my mind that just being armed when I grill out may not be enough. I live in an area where I can get a shot at the threatening bear if I want. I wouldn't think of shooting one I didn't think was a threat but the truth is there are more bear attacks than the tree huggers in the forest service etc. will tell you about. People have learned the 3 S rule. Shoot, shovel and shut up. I just read that 7 people were attacked by bears in Montana in one year and that's the reported attacks. How many go unreported?

    If the bear isn't acting in a threatening manner please leave it alone. If it threatens you in any way take steps to get rid of it. The game warden should be your first call. If that doesn't work there are other ways. They still sell bear traps for example. And they still sell rifles with enough power to do the job. 30.06 is plenty for a black bear or a 12 ga. with a dangerous game load. Black bears aren't that hard to kill really. Don't break any laws whatever you do. But if it's a choice of breaking a law or having your kids threatened the choice is obvious.

    Leave a comment:


  • MyersWaves
    replied
    >>rottweiller'...it's more dangerous to kids than the bear

    I don't where the heck humanity is going to , showing more 'love' for beasts than our own family and kids....

    Since I'm a father of three, this is I would do: (this is NOT a LEGAL ADVICE !)

    1. Call Wildlife Management, probably they will relocate him within 48 hours.

    2, Let the neighbors know about the situation. Probably they will kill it first.

    3. If live in a suburb or your neighbor is closer than 800 yards, forget about shooting, you may kill a person.

    4. If you have good acreage, and 1 & 2 didn't work .....I would shoot it I'm not going to take a risk of checking out if this bear is nice to my kids OR this bear an rare exception and the world would know the fate of my kids in discovery channel. It's not like we are going out in Alaska or in WA woods for bear hunting for thrill of killing, I wouldn't feel bad at all to protect my family or my livestock.

    Also, keep in mind it's a bear, not a deer, 30-06 is my favorite one !


    PS:
    I may lose 30-50 chickens a year to foxes, coyotes and predators , no one gives a damn how much I cared and work to raise them, ... especially those who work in office and spend their life in netflix, all they say is "oh poor fox", The talk about 'compensation', which basically a BS comparing with the time and efforts you may put .....

    Leave a comment:


  • 97bravo20
    replied
    Hi
    I will try to answer some of your questions on a general basis not specifically for your local. First, call your local wildlife management office and report the bear. Do this immediately to protect yourself legally should you be required to take action. Black bears are very common where I live. I see dozens every year. Females with cubs, young males in pairs, large dominate males etc. they all run as soon as they become aware of my presence. Therefore, a black bear just being present is generally not a threat. If it runs away at the sight of a human it's not a risk..... usually. There are always exceptions. Habituated bears are not afraid of people and act very differently. They may actually approach you. The fact that you mentioned baiting the bear into "range" suggests it is not a habituated bear. However, to be sure, eliminate ALL sources of food. Garbage, bird feeders, suet blocks, bird seed compost etc etc. if the bear continues to show up and is unafraid of you when you walk outside then it's habituated or stalking something to eat. That something could be your dog you or your kids.Once you have reported the bear and mentioned that the bear is acting unusually. You have reported that you have removed all food and attractants from the area but the bear is still showing up and acting unafraid of humans and you are concerned for your children's safety. They should respond. If they do not and the bear approaches you, don't mess with a bow. Shoot the animal with the most effective weapon available to you. (12 gauge pump loaded with slugs?). If this unfortunate situation occurs you have at least have proof that you reported the unusual activity of the animal and you waited for the authorities to respond and only took action when you had no choice. No one expects you to allow harm to come to your family. Once you have taken all reasonable steps, if you must then defend yourself you are within your rights. After all bears can be rabid too. On the other hand, don't expect to get a rug or mount out of the deal. The animal will be checked, probably autopsied and then disposed of.

    Leave a comment:


  • Victor Gutarra
    replied
    Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
    MY point, Honk, is if I've got a bear frequenting my backyard and I have small children, I'm not going to fret over seasons, tags or laws. It's going down first opportunity I get!
    You can sit around and banter about the ethics and morals of "hunting" a "habituated" bear all you want, I'm going to protect my family!
    Have you considering buy an Argentinian Dogo? I'm scared of bears and owning one or a couple seem the best way to protect yourself or loved ones at any time, they are really great friends too.

    Leave a comment:


  • matt1326
    replied
    i lived in WA for yrs when i was stationed up there and the bear season is long, i know there over the fence back and forth on the topic of baiting for bears. And i have killed alot of bears up there with bows rifle and pistols, i'd say go for it let your neighbors know what your plans are, so after you stick him with an arrow and he goes a running and crashes through the yards or woods by your house, let him go lay down for a good 45 min. have a friend there or your wife with a back up gun which is still allowed in WA. in case he does the charge but 99% of the time the take off running or flipping around trying to get the arrow out, practice with your bow and make sure your dead on. walk up with caution after the shot and the killer wait is over bring your bow and a back up shooter just in case. and about $500-$800 later you'll have a nice bear rug or full body mount same price, the meat is a little greasy and stringy,, good for stews and pot roasts, and spicy jerky. but in the end you get the bear you have wanted , no more worry about the bear being around your kids, and a little meat and a nice rug.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blowfly basher
    replied
    You wrote "I have young children so obviously this is a problem....why is it a PROBLEM? do you mean "there could be a risk"...have you had that risk assessed? through contact with your Wildlife Department...I'll reply with some dry humour here and there...

    How long has it been happening and what's in your 'yard' attracting it?..How big is your yard and what does the bravado-generic term "roaming around my yard" actually and in reality..mean?

    "I'll have to kill it"...there's a huge gap between bravado and reality. Why haven't you already contacted the wildlife service? if you are so worried about it..y'all...? How big is this scavenger?

    Why are you living in an area they inhabit and roam if concerned about your children's safety simply from being there?...Is it a hand-me-down of America's origin and the penny-dreadfulls ,...."we have escaped the inquistion so now we'll kill the indians and kil the game they live from so we can feel safe...bad luck about them but they deserve it for being around when we want to 'aquire' their space and wealth and turn the place into a jungle of pawn shops, crime bosses slums, greed driven human monsters and various forms of casino...like wall street".

    Bow shooters have a greatly inflated idea of their prowess and often only finish off an animal (for their 'what a great hunter-gather am I...eh!!...???' videos ) just shot or shot at the same time by a bullet.

    If this so far tolerant bear has been properly trained to do its job of self protection and acts on instinct by your change of stink it might well rip your arms and legs off before you can say 'boo-hoo'..and even if you do hit it it may only anger and frighten it into damaging others if it runs off.

    As far as 'I own a Rottweiller'...it's more dangerous to kids than the bear and a bear would rip it to pieces anyway. As far as "no bar is gonna be in my yard" (I'll not be menaced in my own yard! (...or home!) Ain't gonna happen.)that's the Charles Manson mentality...Give us a break!..too much watching Kentucky rifle, Al Capone, Rambo or reading of the Patriot Act.?

    The way you have framed the question unless meant to be a 'Dorothy Dixer' or some kind of general-education-in-print gives me the impression you may not have the temperament to be confronting a bear or even sneaking up ot, maybe disguised as a pot plant or a tin can or a letter box.

    Were I you I would already have done this...quickly contact and discuss your fears and what can be done for you with your wildlife service...not the local Gran'pop-Annual hunters down the pub who like to kill everything that moves as a solution to all problems..or even if there is no problem.....and with the Wildlife service come to safe and sensible and legal solutions as several have suggested before I have.

    If you can't cope with the local "possibly" D.G. wildlife other than to kill it perhaps it might be less stressy if you move to a place where such animals don't live any more...New York perhaps or Brooklyn or somewhere in old Californie..or Texas...or split the difference...the Ozarks

    Unfortunately you likely find the 'humans' a lot more deadly and dishonest and scheming than your bear 'roaming around your yard'.

    How about asking your wildlife people about getting educated in how to live with the local fauna, safely and sensibly...and without a dog hanging around to irritate it whilst 'protecting you' or having a cat killing the small animals and birds.

    The human mind in paranoic environments gets off on paranoia...and self justifcation. For example All the bears in the Pyranees were killed by locals (supposedly over sheep deaths). Some 25 yeas ago (as I recall it) a couple were released there again to get nature back on track I guess as it was no longer 'the old days' . They were shot too...why?...c'est evident, n'est ce pas qu'il est possible quelqufois quelquejour,quelquplace ils tuerions un mouton".

    Man is certainly the most consienceless predator of other men and of animals and mammals and fish on the planet...Even though primed with heroic stories of Daniele Boone 'killed him a bar when he was only three' (yeah right!!...and Ike Clanton was a Major in the Salvation Army,MK Ultra is apublic service to all manking, Operation Paperclip is a new toothpaste, Bush was a great President who vever smoked drank took drugs or lied, Obama is an undercover Muhammedan Jihadist and so on and on with the self delusions.

    Living with our wildlife actually indicates a DEVELOPING society. Killing it doesn't, it's retrograde, and the 'hunter gatherer dna' is simply nonsense....few men behind a rifle boasting all that would have survived that way with a spear and a stone knife.

    Women were the gatherers and men did some hunting...as far as we know to simply fulfill needs for food or trade.

    I am a gun and DG game rifle and pistol collector and user over the last 50 years or so...but I don't need to kill unless it is for predator control then I don't kill the old but the young...killing the old stops the proper education of the young and that's where we introduce much of the problem we face as graziers and farmers in wilderness areas such as Rhodesia. Voila

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Devine
    replied
    Check out the news video link below.

    A Pennsylvania black bear climbed over the back yard fence and killed a goat in front of the goat owners.

    www.wfmz.com/news/Regional-Poconos-Coal/bear-attacks-pet-goat-in-monroe-county/-/149546/21039158/-/14bdp52z/-/index.html

    Leave a comment:


  • WA Mtnhunter
    replied
    DakotaMan,

    Gearing up for that elk hunt yet? I'm betting you are! I need another week to catch up and I am going to be putting in some serious early morning range time although I don't think my rifles need tuning. Confidence is 90% of good shooting IMO.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    WAM... sounds like real good advice to me. I like it... and a bargain at that.

    Leave a comment:


  • WA Mtnhunter
    replied
    Some sound legal advice - - Free!

    Baiting bears or cougars is not legal in the State of Washington, period. If you are in an incorporated jurisdiction, it may be illegal to discharge any weapon including a bow for any purpose. Clean up whatever is attracting them and call WDFW and let them know you have a problem bear.

    This free advice has been provided as a public service and in no way represents the views of the management or the comically insane on this blog.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Devine
    replied
    The bear is looking for food. Get rid of the bird feeders and the outside dog and cat food dish. Secure your trash can lid.

    I would get a strong slingshot and shoot the bear in the butt with a large stone. Be careful, there could be a law against harassing wildlife.
    I think a bear would rather have a sore butt then being shot dead with a rifle slug.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pathfinder1
    replied
    Hi...


    A bear with an arrow stuck in it could run amok through the whole neighborhood.

    If it became a face-to-face threat...forget about your "restricted neighborhood" area, and nail that critter to the ground.

    Otherwise, get in touch with your bear cops ASAP.

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    MY point, Honk, is if I've got a bear frequenting my backyard and I have small children, I'm not going to fret over seasons, tags or laws. It's going down first opportunity I get!
    You can sit around and banter about the ethics and morals of "hunting" a "habituated" bear all you want, I'm going to protect my family!

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Bubba you put something into what I said that wasn't there. I wouldn't call shooting a habituated animal the same as hunting a wild one. I didn't say or imply that wild animals are any more or less dangerous than habituated ones. The theme here is whether it is appropriate or sporting to dink around and wait for open season to shoot the habituated bear, not whether it's safe to do so. Of course it's not safe to do so but the fella seems to think it's okay to make the bear more habituated so he can hang a semi-tame bear on the wall a few weeks down the road. Not a trophy I would be proud of and that is the point I was making. But I guess you were too "stupid" to figure it out. Not sure how I could have made it any clearer though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Treestand
    replied
    Sorry for the multiple post I'm at my hunt camp and Wi/Fi

    Leave a comment:

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