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When I go Elk hunting the choices are 30-06, 25-06, or 350 Rem. mag. Which one should I carry? Why?

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  • #16
    potterman, in another post, you didn't even know what a 25-06 was. a 25-06 DOES have great range. 500 yard shots if necessary. Del, i would go with the 25-06. it makes a good story when you're telling people that you shot an elk with one of the smaller elk calibers. just like MLH said, a 30-06 has taken too many big bulls, yawn, try something different. i would feel it to be more rewarding to kill a huge animal with a small bullet, rather than give it the ole "BANG FLOP"-clay. it's your choice, do what's comfortable to you.

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    • #17
      PotterMan96 . . .

      A primary design function of the 25-06 is long-range, flat trajectory shooting. This is due to the 25-06's ability to push aerodynamic bullets out the barrel at velocities ranging from 3100 to 3700 fps, depending on bullet weight. For example, a very experienced shooter with a excellent rifle on a calm day can drop a prairie dog at 600-700 yards, a coyote at 500 yards, a deer at 400 yards, or an elk at 300, if using proper bullets of the right construction. (Of course, most very experienced shooters keep all their shots on game animals to 300 yards and under, but that's a different issue.) The 25-06 comes very close to being an ideal all-purpose cartridge for
      non-dangerous game in the USA.

      The .350 Remington Magnum, on the other hand, is primarily a short-range, slow velocity, big-slug cartridge. Muzzle velocity is anemic when compared to any of the fast .25s, .264s, .277s, .284s and .308s. After about 175 yards, bullets fired from a .350 Remington Magnum take on the aerodynamic characteistics, trajectory and flight path of a coke machine when dropped out the back of a parked pickup.

      Many of the people who read and write on these blog message boards are experienced shooters and reloaders who have put a whole lot of bullets downrange for a whole lot of years. You might wish to study your reloading manuals and published factory ballistics tables--and do quite a bit of handloading and shooting along the way--before you incorrectly condemn a great cartridge and incorrectly praise an unremarkable one.

      TWD

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      • #18
        By the way, my own vote:

        For a cow elk and ranges of 300 yards or under, I'll take a 25-06 or its equivalent, the .257 Ackley Improved (I've owned a 25-06 and own two 257 AI rifles). I would use the Nosler 110-grain Accubond or 115-grain Partition or 120-grain Partition, or the Barnes 115-grain TSX, all of them pushed by a very healthy load of H-100-V powder and, in sub-zero winter enviroments, magnum primers.

        For a trophy bull (again at ranges of 300 yards and under), I'd take the 30-06, again using the Accubond or Partition or TSX, with bullet weights from 150-180 grains (I've fired many hundreds of 30-06 rounds, though I have not owned one for many years).

        I wouldn't use a .350 Remington Magnum unless I absolutely had no other choice, and I would limit my shot to 175 yards or under. (I've fired perhaps 20 rounds of .350 Remington Magnum in a Remington Model 673 shooting 250-grain bullets at about 2550 fps muzzle velocity.) Yes, it's true that if you can find 180-grain bullets to handload in the cartridge, and if you have a rifle with a decent-length barrel you can push handloaded bullets out the muzzle at close to 3000 fps--which admittedly will give the shooter a decent trajectory out to 300 yards-- but if one handloads the big 220-225 grainers or 250-grainers, muzzle velocity maxes out around 2600 or 2450 fps respectively, which equates to short-range trajectories only. Plus, the .350 Remington Magnum, unless I am in error, is not available as a factory cartridge these days, and may not be chambered in any factory-produced rifles these days either.

        TWD

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        • #19
          I guided for a guy that regualary shot and killed elk w/ a .243 he would'nt let anybody shoot less then .300 Win Mags though. As for as your question, shoot what you feel comfortable with. As for the rounds offered, the .350 will kill 'em deader than a mackrel, but not a lot of range. .25-06 range but(I feel no knock down power at range) it's a fine rifle for thin skined game but this is elk we're talking about. Now as for the .30-06 sure its killed lots of elk(yawn?, I thought thats what you we're trying to do!).It's got range(second longest recorded shot in military history, behind the.50 cal)if you screw up and leave ammo at home you can get some almost ANYWHERE ! I'm from the Ruark school "Use Enough Gun ! Good luck and good hunting !

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          • #20
            PotterMan96,
            I can most definatly can tell you havnt researched your guns. The 25-06 has much more range than the 350. The 30-06 would be the best gun for the job. I say that because it barly has less knock down power than the 350 but has more range.

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            • #21
              What are you talkin about hunterkid in an old question you had never even heard about a 25-06 so you have no room to talk.

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              • #22
                Agreed with MLH answer above and A + 1 for you sir!!!

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by MLH View Post
                  Whichever one you haven't used for elk, yet. Why? Because they should all work with the right bullet. Otherwise, I'd consider which bullets you want to try out, the terrain you'll be hunting, the scope you have mounted, and whether you're willing to bang up the gun.

                  There's been so much talk here about the .25-06 that I think a lot of people would like to see you use that.

                  The .30-06 has taken so many that it's ... yawn ... just another elk taken with old dependable.

                  The .350 Rem. Mag - that just makes me smile because I love .35s and know that should work just fine.
                  Huge fan of the 350 rem mag. It has enough power for anything in North America. And the larger caliber bullet is devastating on bigger game. For a short action, it's a relatively flat shooter with bullets in the 200 grain area. I also like short actions because they are less gun you have to carry. Although the 25-06 will no doubt kill an elk, I think it a bit light. Any shot placement less than ideal,might result in issues. Can't argue with a 30-06,I'm sure it has taken more elk than any other caliber. However, the 350 rem mag will give you just a little extra punch.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by T.W. Davidson View Post
                    By the way, my own vote:

                    For a cow elk and ranges of 300 yards or under, I'll take a 25-06 or its equivalent, the .257 Ackley Improved (I've owned a 25-06 and own two 257 AI rifles). I would use the Nosler 110-grain Accubond or 115-grain Partition or 120-grain Partition, or the Barnes 115-grain TSX, all of them pushed by a very healthy load of H-100-V powder and, in sub-zero winter enviroments, magnum primers.

                    For a trophy bull (again at ranges of 300 yards and under), I'd take the 30-06, again using the Accubond or Partition or TSX, with bullet weights from 150-180 grains (I've fired many hundreds of 30-06 rounds, though I have not owned one for many years).

                    I wouldn't use a .350 Remington Magnum unless I absolutely had no other choice, and I would limit my shot to 175 yards or under. (I've fired perhaps 20 rounds of .350 Remington Magnum in a Remington Model 673 shooting 250-grain bullets at about 2550 fps muzzle velocity.) Yes, it's true that if you can find 180-grain bullets to handload in the cartridge, and if you have a rifle with a decent-length barrel you can push handloaded bullets out the muzzle at close to 3000 fps--which admittedly will give the shooter a decent trajectory out to 300 yards-- but if one handloads the big 220-225 grainers or 250-grainers, muzzle velocity maxes out around 2600 or 2450 fps respectively, which equates to short-range trajectories only. Plus, the .350 Remington Magnum, unless I am in error, is not available as a factory cartridge these days, and may not be chambered in any factory-produced rifles these days either.

                    TWD
                    I also have taken elk with all three calibers mentioned. Although I agree that the 350 Remington Magnum is impossible to get ammo for and no manufacturers chamber it in rifles anymore, it's still an excellent elk caliber for the handloader.

                    A 200 grain bullet can be pushed to 2800 f/s. This velocity equals the 30-06 180 grain loading. Therefore, the two will shoot equally flat but the 350 will have more energy at equal ranges.

                    I also like the fact that the 350 is a short action. Makes rifle chambered for it just slightly easier to carry.



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