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.30/06 vs. 7mm Rem Mag for elk. I know both are sufficient in about every circumstance, but I want to know what you all think!

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  • .30/06 vs. 7mm Rem Mag for elk. I know both are sufficient in about every circumstance, but I want to know what you all think!

    .30/06 vs. 7mm Rem Mag for elk. I know both are sufficient in about every circumstance, but I want to know what you all think! Please include bullet/weight combinations. Thanks

  • #2
    I don't know anything about the 7mm but I took a bull with a .30-06 with 165 grain bullets. I hit him twice in the lungs and once in the liver. He still walked over 100 yards before piling up. I don't think more bullet would have changed the result, maybe a heart shot would have made him expire faster and obviously a head or spine shot would drop them. Shot placement over bullet weight as long as you are not significantly undersized.

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    • #3
      I've never shot an elk with an '06 but I have watched many drop from one shot. Folks used 150, 165, and 180 grain bullets. I really can't say one is better than the other but I would use the 165. 7 mags I have used successfully a lot. 160 Partitions and 168 Berger VLDs have made more one shot kills for me than other choices but then I tend to stick to what works for me and in fact have not used many other bullets or heavier ones on elk from my 7 mm mags. By the way my velocities are near max as neither rifle has ever had a factory produced round used in it.

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      • #4
        burnettjv, I’ve witnessed the use of both 7mm Rem Mag and 30-06 on many Bull Moose and the 30-06 definably has the edge on the 7mm Rem Mag! One of the biggest problems is with the 7mm/.284 diameter bullets, you don’t get the wound channel of a 30 cal and the 175’s are notorious for tumbling upon impact having less penetration. I’ve recovered several 7mm’s that looked like bananas.

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        • #5
          s-kfry, shot placement is the main factor but you know as well as I do when you are out of breath and wheezing, the wind is blowing, your hands are freezing, there's not a good rest nearby and you forgot your shooting sticks, the elk is leaving, and you are not for sure how far he is away from you, you sometimes do what you have to do. Your shot and results sounds reasonable to me. I have lung shot elk with my .338/250 gr and had them more or less drop where they stood. I prefer it over either of the smaller diameter bullets.

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          • #6
            One more thing, I can push a 190 grain out of my 06 as fast as you can with a 175. Has more foot pound energy and flatter trajectory even at 1000yards! Also people compare the same bullet weights to each other and this is wrong. Take a 7mm bullet weight at the max velocity and you will find that a 30-06 can push a heavier bullet just as fast. Where the 7mm Rem Mag really shines is with 150’s or less!

            7mm Rem Mag does make beautiful 338 Win Mag cases, no fire form needed! I’ve also used 300 Win Mag cases too!!

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            • #7
              30/06, 180 grain bullet. Swift or Nosler Accubond

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              • #8
                I'd use my '06 with a quality 180 gr. bullet unless i planned on reaching out from beyond 300 yds. Then I might use 165's

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                • #9
                  The best shot on big game was a teenage kid with a 30-06 loaded with Remington 180 grain Core-Lokt® on a Moose. About 100 yards and dropped that that monster Bull literally in its tracks! Now if a 30-06 will do that to a Moose, then think what will it do to an Elk!

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                  • #10
                    Best round for dropping anything on this contenent, 30-06 220 Gr Barnes X Bullets. I've used them for Bear, Moose, Deer. In my 30-30 I use a 170 Grain Remingtons. I practice with 168 gr in my 30-06, and switch to 220 grain for hunting. The trajectory is different, but if you know where the bullet is going, and how it will travel, the difference is miniscule.

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                    • #11
                      Geez, hard question.

                      I have seen my son drop several elk with one shot with his 7mm Rem Mag with 160 gr Trophy Bonded Bear Claw's and deer with 160 gr Speer Mag Tip handloads. I have also taken down elk with .30-06 165 TBBC's. Shot placement seems more important than .308 vs .284 diameter given a similar bullet weight. Having seen numerous elk cleanly taken by my son and another hunting partner with 7mm magnums, I have to say that the 7mm is just as effective as a .30-06.

                      I've taken most of my elk with a .35 Whelen with Federal 225 grain TBBC and a couple early on with 250 grain loads, so the 225 TBBC is what I continue to use just because it always works for me.

                      Rule #1 = Don't Mess With Success!

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                      • #12
                        I have had two one shot kills on big bulls at over 250 yards with 7mm 140 grain core lokt. It's not how big and bad your bullet is, it's where you put it. neither bull went over 50 yards. Both were lung shots, and the lungs were totaly destroyed. Heres one for ya, My hunting buddy has a perfect record of one shot kills on nice bulls, 21 bulls with 243. He is 73 years old.

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                        • #13
                          Agreed with ishawooa answer above and A + 1 for you sir!!!

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                          • #14
                            ishawooa always seems to be on the money. I totally agree with WA Mtnhunter also!
                            The 7mm Mag's will get it done in fine fashion as any 30.06 or 300 Mag. Bullet selection and placement of the shot determine success almost all of the time.
                            Almost every shooter has his favorite cartridge and caliber. It is easy to tell by our limited opinions.
                            It seems that the .30 caliber only crowd are usually stuck on that bullet diameter and will talk down other calibers. Most of the time it is easy to tell they do not have any experience with another caliber such as 7mm, 338, .35's and so on. That's okay though, it makes for fun talk like rooting for your favorite team!
                            Bottom line is, you can not go wrong with either caliber for elk.
                            However, bigger is always better in my book. So I agree with ishawooa . . . if you are going after elk, use a .338 win mag and you will not be disappointed.
                            Good luck with which ever caliber you choose!

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                            • #15
                              I own both rifles in both caliber so no knock on the 30/06, but the ballistics of the 7mm Remington Magnum are quite impressive. Considering that the rule of thumb is that an Elk caliber should produce 1000 foot pounds of energy at a given range for Elk hunting, here is how the 7mm Remington Magnum does at 500 yards which is farther than most hunters should be shooting.
                              Statistics are taken from Remington.com using their standard pointed Core-Lokt bullets. The 7mm Remington Magnum with either a 140, 150, or 175 grain bullet carries over 1000 foot pounds of energy out past 500 yards. In the case of the 175 grain bullet, the 7mm Remington Magnum reaches 500 yards with 1372 foot pounds of energy.
                              For a comparison, the venerable 30/06 can only produce these levels of energy with premium bullets.
                              The use of premium bullets in the 7mm Remington Magnum can push the 500 yard energy level to the 1700 foot pound level. So obviously, even at extremely long range the 7mm Remington Magnum has more than enough power for Elk hunting.
                              For many hunters this means that the 7mm Remington Magnum can produce a humane kill farther than they should be shooting.
                              More importantly for long range shooting, the increased velocity of the 7mm Remington Magnum beats the 30-06 in bullet drop at 500 yards by at least 10 inches depending on bullet selection.
                              Those are some technical details, but either caliber will get the job done so long as the bullets arrives in the vitals.

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