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  • Struggling with skeet?

    For years I struggled to break twenty at skeet. Sporting clays I shot inconsistently, some stations better than others, but still well enough to be top gun some weeks. Trap I typically have shot well (though not so great this year, only averaged 21 through league but now up to 22). So what was the problem with skeet? Last year the light kinda went on ... accidentally. On station one at clays the machine throwing incoming targets kept breaking them. Sometimes I'd have to pull six or seven before one cleared the trees. A guy can only hold a heavy Magnum Twelve A-5 up to shoulder so long before arms give out. So I dropped to low gun and kept pulling till something finally showed up to shoot at. Up went the gun and poof went the target. Hmmm. This was one of my more difficult stations. So I went low gun through the rest of the stations and shot into the forties! Now, I mean true low gun like I'm walking after pheasants, not simply head off the comb with butt just under the shoulder pocket and gun pointed in general direction of target trajectory. That should have told me something about what might help for skeet. Then at the end of the clays season we have a flurry shoot to wind things up (team of two shoot at fifty targets thrown randomly in a set pattern from four or five different throwers surrounding them). In preparation for the flurry shoot I decided to practice by shooting skeet low gun. Should help because flurry shooters are constantly reloading and getting the gun back up on targets. From low gun I shot 24/25 missing the final option on low house #8!! Next round I shot a 22. Have rarely failed to break twenty since then. Mind you, I still shoot station #8 with gun to shoulder. My old eyes and reflexes just can't do that one low gun. Not fast enough. Not yet anyway.

    What's the explanation? Two things. With the gun held down I have a clear view of the targets as they leave the house. This is especially important for high house stations 2 to 5 because I'm essentially blind in my left eye. At low gun I can find the targets quicker as they leave the houses and that is critical for skeet. I'm now shooting much smoother and not rushing my shots scrambling to find and get on targets too late. Secondly, I'm not overthinking the easier shots: e.g. high house #1 & #6. Or the harder ones, particularly both houses at #4. The key to making low gun work is having a gun that fits ... perfectly. It needs to float up into the shoulder pocket and onto the target in one smooth motion. If the stock is too short, you won't be on the gun when you find the target and you'll usually shoot high ... or get a bloody nose. If it's too long, the butt will get caught on clothing which disrupts the flow. Also, don't get in a hurry. It's not necessary. I often now will even drop back to low gun for the second shot in doubles.

    It works. Well, it works for me anyway. Got my first 25 straight at skeet last night ... finally, after shooting at least a dozen 24s this season. Followed by 22 (missed three shots at #4 including high house option) and 23. Last year I was struggling to shoot 19.
    Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 07-11-2019, 05:35 PM.

  • #2
    When I got out of Basic training I was stationed at Seymour Johnson AFB in North Carolina. They had a great rod and gun club on base with skeet fields and trap fields both/
    . They had a reloading room in the club with Mec 600 Jr's for us to load with all we did was have to furnish our componants. the only shotgun I had was a Ted Williams Jr. pump 20 ga with full choke. I had never shot skeet before and I learned with the 20 ga. full choke gun. I used the low gun position too. I won several matches shooting 50/50 with the full choke gun.

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    • #3
      A couple of times I have walked over to skeet range after shooting trap without changing chokes in Black Beauty (my Magnum Twelve A-5 .. the "Beauty" is of course a pun). Shooting skeet with full choke is hit or miss ... and if you hit the clays they usually dematerialize.
      Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 07-15-2019, 08:43 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Wow, so insightful there Honk...
        Maybe now you can start hitting crossing shots on live birds in the head 😎

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by springerman3 View Post
          Wow, so insightful there Honk...
          Maybe now you can start hitting crossing shots on live birds in the head 😎
          Skeet shooting and pheasant shooting is an apples and oranges comparison. Sure, a little breeze can do funny things to a clay target but a big clumsy pheasant becomes a barnstorming stunt pilot in the same wind. At the range you know where the clay is coming from and generally where it's going. In the field you don't know when the bird will "pull" especially when hunting over flushers. And it's seldom possible to predict where it will go when it gets in the air. At the range I leisurely walk up to the station, shoot my targets, then wait for the rest of the board to shoot theirs before walking a few yards to the next station and repeat. Last couple of years I often walk all day over hill and dale before getting a shot at a rooster.

          The best thing that can be said for skeet or clays in preparing a shooter for hunting is that it helps familiarise him with his gun. But of course if he shoots a different gun for every station or every week at the range, any advantage is questionable. To be successful hunting for pheasants my advice is to:

          1) Know your dog. Spend time with him/her in the home and on the training grounds. My dogs go EVERYWHERE with me whether it's road trips or walking to the grocery store. Handler and dog must be of the same mind when they get to the field in the fall.

          2) Know your limitations. Get in shape if you expect to spend long days enjoying the outdoors. Or you won't enjoy it. Go to the field flabby and soft and you'll get hurt. Smokers can expect to run out of gas very quickly. Or keel over from a heart attack. A prof once warned me I would have to choose between being a hunter and a scholar. I managed to prove him wrong. However I will say that a smoker will never be much of a hunter. He may shoot a lot of game sitting in a blind but that's not "fair chase" in the true sense of the term. There is no pursuit involved. And if you want to shoot pheasants you will need to pursue them.

          3) Know the country and your quarry. I have been at this so long that I can find a new piece to hunt and immediately size up a strategic plan of attack just looking at the lay of the land, the wind, and the time of day.

          4) Know your gun. Go to the patterning board and see how the gun fits. Shoot from low gun and quickly. Adjust accordingly or find another gun. Then practice shooting clay targets ... low gun. Trap is a good starting point but eventually move to skeet or clays if available ... and shoot low gun. Go back to trap from time to time for the unpredictability factor. Ideal practice for pheasants would be shooting trap low gun from about ten yards behind the house. Unfortunately our range won't allow it.

          Shooting targets is at the bottom of the list for a reason. It's expensive and many folks can't afford a lot of time at the range and an extended road trip for uplands. If it's a matter of choosing one or the other, I would definitely advise saving the $ for the latter. Number three is an expensive one too. That kind of knowledge isn't found in books or magazines. My best advice there is for the newbie to hire a good guide the first year, one who is chatty and spends time in the field one-on-one with his clients. Not some guy who hauls a bunch of hung over fat dudes out to a field in a bus and drops them off to do a drive. You don't learn anything doing that.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post

            Skeet shooting and pheasant shooting is an apples and oranges comparison. Sure, a little breeze can do funny things to a clay target but a big clumsy pheasant becomes a barnstorming stunt pilot in the same wind. At the range you know where the clay is coming from and generally where it's going. In the field you don't know when the bird will "pull" especially when hunting over flushers. And it's seldom possible to predict where it will go when it gets in the air. At the range I leisurely walk up to the station, shoot my targets, then wait for the rest of the board to shoot theirs before walking a few yards to the next station and repeat. Last couple of years I often walk all day over hill and dale before getting a shot at a rooster.

            The best thing that can be said for skeet or clays in preparing a shooter for hunting is that it helps familiarise him with his gun. But of course if he shoots a different gun for every station or every week at the range, any advantage is questionable. To be successful hunting for pheasants my advice is to:

            1) Know your dog. Spend time with him/her in the home and on the training grounds. My dogs go EVERYWHERE with me whether it's road trips or walking to the grocery store. Handler and dog must be of the same mind when they get to the field in the fall.

            2) Know your limitations. Get in shape if you expect to spend long days enjoying the outdoors. Or you won't enjoy it. Go to the field flabby and soft and you'll get hurt. Smokers can expect to run out of gas very quickly. Or keel over from a heart attack. A prof once warned me I would have to choose between being a hunter and a scholar. I managed to prove him wrong. However I will say that a smoker will never be much of a hunter. He may shoot a lot of game sitting in a blind but that's not "fair chase" in the true sense of the term. There is no pursuit involved. And if you want to shoot pheasants you will need to pursue them.

            3) Know the country and your quarry. I have been at this so long that I can find a new piece to hunt and immediately size up a strategic plan of attack just looking at the lay of the land, the wind, and the time of day.

            4) Know your gun. Go to the patterning board and see how the gun fits. Shoot from low gun and quickly. Adjust accordingly or find another gun. Then practice shooting clay targets ... low gun. Trap is a good starting point but eventually move to skeet or clays if available ... and shoot low gun. Go back to trap from time to time for the unpredictability factor. Ideal practice for pheasants would be shooting trap low gun from about ten yards behind the house. Unfortunately our range won't allow it.

            Shooting targets is at the bottom of the list for a reason. It's expensive and many folks can't afford a lot of time at the range and an extended road trip for uplands. If it's a matter of choosing one or the other, I would definitely advise saving the $ for the latter. Number three is an expensive one too. That kind of knowledge isn't found in books or magazines. My best advice there is for the newbie to hire a good guide the first year, one who is chatty and spends time in the field one-on-one with his clients. Not some guy who hauls a bunch of hung over fat dudes out to a field in a bus and drops them off to do a drive. You don't learn anything doing that.
            When I was a kid, about 15 (I hunted before I got a license), a buddy and I hunted Pheasant successfully without a dog. Pheasants were rather plentiful as well as rabbits. Anyway, I usually could guess which way the birds would go based on the position of my buddy. I usually shot them in the butt. 12ga, JC Higgins bolt action with adjustable choke.
            It was a bad day when we did not get at least one . If I remember the limit was 2 , but if we each got one we were happy.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post

              Skeet shooting and pheasant shooting is an apples and oranges comparison. Sure, a little breeze can do funny things to a clay target but a big clumsy pheasant becomes a barnstorming stunt pilot in the same wind. At the range you know where the clay is coming from and generally where it's going. In the field you don't know when the bird will "pull" especially when hunting over flushers. And it's seldom possible to predict where it will go when it gets in the air. At the range I leisurely walk up to the station, shoot my targets, then wait for the rest of the board to shoot theirs before walking a few yards to the next station and repeat. Last couple of years I often walk all day over hill and dale before getting a shot at a rooster.

              The best thing that can be said for skeet or clays in preparing a shooter for hunting is that it helps familiarise him with his gun. But of course if he shoots a different gun for every station or every week at the range, any advantage is questionable. To be successful hunting for pheasants my advice is to:

              1) Know your dog. Spend time with him/her in the home and on the training grounds. My dogs go EVERYWHERE with me whether it's road trips or walking to the grocery store. Handler and dog must be of the same mind when they get to the field in the fall.

              2) Know your limitations. Get in shape if you expect to spend long days enjoying the outdoors. Or you won't enjoy it. Go to the field flabby and soft and you'll get hurt. Smokers can expect to run out of gas very quickly. Or keel over from a heart attack. A prof once warned me I would have to choose between being a hunter and a scholar. I managed to prove him wrong. However I will say that a smoker will never be much of a hunter. He may shoot a lot of game sitting in a blind but that's not "fair chase" in the true sense of the term. There is no pursuit involved. And if you want to shoot pheasants you will need to pursue them.

              3) Know the country and your quarry. I have been at this so long that I can find a new piece to hunt and immediately size up a strategic plan of attack just looking at the lay of the land, the wind, and the time of day.

              4) Know your gun. Go to the patterning board and see how the gun fits. Shoot from low gun and quickly. Adjust accordingly or find another gun. Then practice shooting clay targets ... low gun. Trap is a good starting point but eventually move to skeet or clays if available ... and shoot low gun. Go back to trap from time to time for the unpredictability factor. Ideal practice for pheasants would be shooting trap low gun from about ten yards behind the house. Unfortunately our range won't allow it.

              Shooting targets is at the bottom of the list for a reason. It's expensive and many folks can't afford a lot of time at the range and an extended road trip for uplands. If it's a matter of choosing one or the other, I would definitely advise saving the $ for the latter. Number three is an expensive one too. That kind of knowledge isn't found in books or magazines. My best advice there is for the newbie to hire a good guide the first year, one who is chatty and spends time in the field one-on-one with his clients. Not some guy who hauls a bunch of hung over fat dudes out to a field in a bus and drops them off to do a drive. You don't learn anything doing that.
              Oh where should I start......
              do you finally figured out that seeing the target clearly ( hard focus) allows one to move the gun ( muzzle ) to the target better ?
              So what Phil writes in his articles and blogs has finally sunk in, Hallelujah !!!
              I have been shooting low gun at skeet and sporting for over 25 years, wouldn't do it any other way as I view it as practice for hunting.
              Funny, I have been using flushing dogs ( springers ) all my life and have no trouble reading them and anticipating a flush and the direction the bird will fly. We have had this "talk" before..... I must evidently be "better" at reading a dog "or" my springers are "better" ( way more in tune with me ) than your labs πŸ˜‹
              No matter if it is clay birds or the real ones your job as a hunter/shooter is to learn how to move the muzzle past the bird and pull the trigger at the proper moment. Years ago folks could do it both ways, on clays or wild birds.
              Today it is pretty much on clays as most bird populations are way down from 40 plus years ago.
              In sporting the best practice is to shoot each pair as two singles, even pass up stations that don't resemble shots one would take in the field. A good course will even encourage this as it is good customer service, especially for new shooters.
              Your # 4 is full of holes.....most folks mount a gun poorly so unless one gets some training/instruction from someone that knows how to teach this they will rarely put the pattern where it needs to be. A poor mount that is done quickly will give no viable information about where the gun is shooting. Probably the # 1 reason for the "so many" new shotguns that end up on the used gun shelf.
              I could go on about some of this but will stop πŸ˜‹

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by springerman3 View Post

                Oh where should I start......
                do you finally figured out that seeing the target clearly ( hard focus) allows one to move the gun ( muzzle ) to the target better ?
                So what Phil writes in his articles and blogs has finally sunk in, Hallelujah !!!
                I have been shooting low gun at skeet and sporting for over 25 years, wouldn't do it any other way as I view it as practice for hunting.
                Funny, I have been using flushing dogs ( springers ) all my life and have no trouble reading them and anticipating a flush and the direction the bird will fly. We have had this "talk" before..... I must evidently be "better" at reading a dog "or" my springers are "better" ( way more in tune with me ) than your labs πŸ˜‹
                No matter if it is clay birds or the real ones your job as a hunter/shooter is to learn how to move the muzzle past the bird and pull the trigger at the proper moment. Years ago folks could do it both ways, on clays or wild birds.
                Today it is pretty much on clays as most bird populations are way down from 40 plus years ago.
                In sporting the best practice is to shoot each pair as two singles, even pass up stations that don't resemble shots one would take in the field. A good course will even encourage this as it is good customer service, especially for new shooters.
                Your # 4 is full of holes.....most folks mount a gun poorly so unless one gets some training/instruction from someone that knows how to teach this they will rarely put the pattern where it needs to be. A poor mount that is done quickly will give no viable information about where the gun is shooting. Probably the # 1 reason for the "so many" new shotguns that end up on the used gun shelf.
                I could go on about some of this but will stop πŸ˜‹
                Re your comments on my #4: If the gun doesn't fit right, the shooter doesn't stand much of a chance getting it mounted correctly, especially shooting quickly from low gun. Shooting high gun at the range one can do all manner of things to adjust for a poor fitting gun. But then get to the field and same guy shooting the same gun can't hit his butt with two hands. Been there, done that! If he restricts himself to shooting low gun at the range (skeet and clays) he'll soon figure out something is amiss with the gun more than the mounting (which should be pretty much automatic when shooting low gun). Then it's time for the patterning board. With a little help from the internet, anyone should then be able to determine what's needed to correct their gun for a proper fit for quick mounting. In my case, the stock that came on my Japanese Magnum Twelve (which was obviously originally from a Light Twelve Belgian model - FN buttplate and no recoil pad) was apparently designed for a trap gun. The comb, though straight, was at least a half inch higher at the butt than normal field gun stock. Also, just about any factory stock is too short for my long arms, long neck, and lack of shoulder flesh. I switched to black synthetic with a regular field comb drop and added a slip-on pad for additional length. Now when that gun goes up to my shoulder the bead is barely visible above the humpback receiver (not that I look at the bead when shooting at targets/birds, but it is important to know where it's situated to determine correct mount). I prefer to shoot everything flat: birds, trap, skeet, and clays. It works for me. My trap average is back up to 23 and skeet is just under that. Sporting clays I'm regularly shooting 80+ for two rounds on our very difficult course. It takes some doing to break 40/50 on this one. Everything but trap and station #8 skeet is true low gun (butt of gun at hip when clay is pulled). I'd shoot low gun at trap but my eyes are too poor to pick up the target in time. Same reason I have to shoot high gun on #8 skeet. Last night I had to pull a trial target from high house #8 to get a line on where it left the late afternoon shadow of the house. Two targets already went by and I never saw them. Once I determined where the clay left the shadow, I nailed the next one. Still counted it as a miss = 22. Also a pair of 23s. A good night. Trap was better: 23, 24, 25. My problems with trap earlier this year were due to not looking at the house for the clay. I'd get the gun lined up, then pull and try to catch the target looking over the gun. Get the gun mounted properly and lined up on right spot, then STOP LOOKING AT THE GUN! Move eye to the spot on the house where the clay will leave. Pull, float the gun to the target and shoot ... never taking eyes off the clay. Of course, none of this is a problem shooting low gun skeet and clays. That's all mounting and shooting in one quick fluid motion.
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                Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 07-17-2019, 07:18 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Trying to figure out that a gun is not shooting where one is looking is far from "automatic".
                  If you ask someone to show you how they mount the gun to shoot at a bird ( clay or feathered ) it is almost hilarious to watch.
                  The guy that can't hit his butt with a gun he normally shoots well with, ( no matter if the gun fits or not ) the odds are well past 90 % his mount is crap !!
                  Any coach worth the money is going to tell you to clean up your mount before they worry about gun fit......unless the gun is way too long or short.
                  I have seen folks with guns that have been professionally fitted but until they "learn" to mount the gun properly the results will continue to be poor.
                  Just because a hammer fits a person's hand doesn't mean they will hit the nail every time 😎

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by springerman3 View Post
                    Trying to figure out that a gun is not shooting where one is looking is far from "automatic".
                    If you ask someone to show you how they mount the gun to shoot at a bird ( clay or feathered ) it is almost hilarious to watch.
                    The guy that can't hit his butt with a gun he normally shoots well with, ( no matter if the gun fits or not ) the odds are well past 90 % his mount is crap !!
                    Any coach worth the money is going to tell you to clean up your mount before they worry about gun fit......unless the gun is way too long or short.
                    I have seen folks with guns that have been professionally fitted but until they "learn" to mount the gun properly the results will continue to be poor.
                    Just because a hammer fits a person's hand doesn't mean they will hit the nail every time 😎
                    But if it doesn't fit the hand a thumbnail is probably gonna be falling off very soon! Give my daughter a framing hammer to hang pictures and she'll probably make a mess of the wall and/or her fingers. So much for that analogy.

                    No coach will ever be able to teach my daughter to properly mount my 31" barrel Magnum Twelve. The stock is too long and the gun is too heavy. WAY too heavy. Finding the right stock length is particularly important for proper mount, especially from low gun position. If one is careful and has good coaching, he/she can make a poor fitting gun work reasonably well shooting trap. Last year my goose hunting buddy picked up a good deal on an SKB made Ithaca O/U with wood that had some minor dings. I refinished it and he let me shoot some trap with it. Right away I knew there was a big difference that required some adjustment. The stock on my big A-5 is at least an inch longer and had more drop at the comb. Without adding a slip-on I was still able to adjust myself and shot a perfect round. Required some concentration and scrunching my cheek hard on the gun to keep it shooting flat. But generally speaking, scrunching and concentration are not conducive to effective trap shooting ... or shooting anything else. The shooter needs to be relaxed and only concentrate on seeing the target and flowing to it, NOT focused on adjusting to the gun. Shooting that same gun low gun would be hopeless for me. I'd never be in the right position because the gun would automatically always be in the wrong position.

                    Tuesday I shot 22, 23, 24 skeet and 24, 23, 25 trap. Tonight I shot a pair of 44/50 sporting clays (any time one can break 80/100 two rounds on this tough course, it's something special and usually top gun for the night). Trap is high gun of course, but I shoot clays and skeet genuine low gun (except #8 skeet). I arrived late tonight and had to jump in at second station with a full board of shooters. Consequently, the boys forced me to shoot the makeup round at station #1 back to back when we started second round. Not nice in that heat! I wanted to shoot my first makeup round before everyone got started but no, the stinkers made me shoot them both together at the end. I shot clean for the first makeup round but then missed three the second batch. By then the gun barrel was hot and fore end slippery (about 95 degrees this afternoon and same % humidity). So I showed them! Only missed three clays through the next six stations. But it would have been nice to break ninety.

                    I am SO much more comfortable shooting low gun. Being able to find the target first with a clear field of view works MUCH better for my screwed up eyes and ageing reflexes. And low gun doesn't give me time to overthink the shot.

                    Yes, Phil can take some credit. A couple of years ago I questioned why I would muff three wide open shots at a setup over the dogs in the open and then smack a pair of roosters through the willows on a ditch with just about zero window of opportunity. He advised I was overthinking the easy shots. Make them tougher by mounting later and shooting quicker. Then I watched George, an eighty-some retired wildlife biology prof, shooting sporting clays. George's eyesight has just about had it. Lots of problems. He always shoots low gun and if he can find the clays, he nails them! I always thought George must have formerly been an extraordinary good shot and he was simply challenging himself shooting low gun. But then last year when I was doing the brushup for flurry shoot by going low gun at skeet, I discovered why George was doing it that way. It keeps him focused on finding the target. Then KEEP EYES ON THE TARGET and float the gun to it with hands. Poof! I don't need to be calculating leads between target and muzzle (which often results in leaving the target for the muzzle ... which too often results in missing the target). I have been at this long enough to instinctively know what the lead should be, especially for scenarios I have shot a thousand times before (i.e. at the range). Trust my instincts, don't second guess them. Low gun doesn't allow for second guessing.
                    Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 07-19-2019, 11:28 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      WOW!!! More insightful stuff about shotgunning that has been written about by Phil and many other knowledgeable folks.
                      We call it "let the eyes lead the hands"
                      Too bad you and George didn't converse more sooner !! If your daughter has listening skills maybe she should get together with him "and" be willing to make changes to the gun she shoots or get a different one ?

                      Also maybe you can help Phil with his new blog scenario .....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by springerman3 View Post
                        WOW!!! More insightful stuff about shotgunning that has been written about by Phil and many other knowledgeable folks.
                        We call it "let the eyes lead the hands"
                        Too bad you and George didn't converse more sooner !! If your daughter has listening skills maybe she should get together with him "and" be willing to make changes to the gun she shoots or get a different one ?

                        Also maybe you can help Phil with his new blog scenario .....
                        George has failing knees and eyesight. He has difficulty finishing one round of fifty targets at clays and his scores aren't that great due to his disabilities. He is not inclined to give advice for that reason.

                        My daughter uses my Light Twelve A-5 and does very well for as little as she shoots it. That gun was also once her granddad's. She is by no means a little gal (takes after her dad, not her tiny mom). For her I load up some wimpy one ounce loads with little recoil. They don't usually eject but she is fine pulling the hulls ... only shoots trap. Jessie can handle that gun but definitely not the extra long big black beast I usually shoot. No point in her shooting low gun because she only shoots trap. LOP might be a bit long for low gun anyway.

                        I don't recall Phil ever advising anyone with poor eyesight to shoot low gun skeet or clays. He has several times blogged about overthinking the shot in the field. And he has suggested shooting low gun skeet and stepping into the shot to prepare for field hunting. But I don't recall him ever indicating it might improve scores.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I should probably add that the key to low gun at skeet or clays is to not get in a hurry. One tends to rush the shot thinking there's less time to get on target when shooting low gun. But if the the gun fits properly and the shooter practices mounting, he should have plenty of time to get on target and shoot.* Keep in mind that for both venues the shooter also has the advantage of knowing where the target is coming from and roughly what flight trajectory it will follow. However, even our station three clays with an old retired trap machine throwing unpredictable oscillating crossers and quartering targets shoots better for me low gun.

                          Again, I emphasise that proper fit is paramount. A few weeks ago we were shooting clays between bursts of rain and thunder. I made the mistake of grabbing my Cabelas goretex Brushbuster wading jacket as I rushed out the door (usually shoot in the rain with my old Park Service rain jacket). Cabelas jackets have a dopey patented "system" of extra fabric in the shoulders and armpits (and everywhere else too it seems) which supposedly improves manoeuvrability when swinging on birds. In reality the effect is exactly the opposite! I frequently get tangled up in all that loose material when trying to mount the gun. It was a real handicap shooting low gun clays that day and I finally had to take the jacket off.** Even this past week when wearing only the better fitting camo Redhead spandex shirt I reviewed a while back, my gun got caught in fabric when mounting for a report pair on the oscillating station. I somehow managed to break the first target shooting off the shoulder while in the process of getting untangled, but I couldn't get properly situated for following clay and missed it. I'll blame that on the Limbsaver slip-on recoil pad. It's super-soft rubber is too "sticky" and has a tendency to grab clothing when mounting the gun (sidewalls are also too soft to keep the thing in place so I have to use duct tape - see attached image). Our local gun shop finally stocked more Pachmeyer Decelerator slip-ons this week and I bought one yesterday (lost mine pheasant hunting last fall). Decelerator is still fairly soft but not as squirrely as Limbsaver and they have a smooth hard rubber heel at the top that doesn't catch on fabric (but be careful setting a Decelerator equipped gun upright on hard surface like a kitchen floor as it's slippery heel has no grip and gun will fall over).

                          * I place a piece of bright tape on crown moulding where living room wall meets the ceiling and often in the evenings I'll practice mounting and swinging to it. Best to do this with drapes pulled if you live in the city!

                          ** That coat is also a handicap when shooting high gun trap as the extra long collar gets in the way of seating the butt properly in my shoulder or to my cheek. A real POS!
                          Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 07-22-2019, 04:14 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Here is one of the benefits of Limbsaver non-slip butt plates:

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 99explorer View Post
                              Here is one of the benefits of Limbsaver non-slip butt plates:
                              Article is appropriately titled, can't imagine anyone being that stupid 😏

                              Comment

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