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First time mounting a scope on a shotgun for deer. Will be using slugs.Will a rifle scope (which I have a few of in my cabinet) stand up to use on a shotgun or do I need to invest in a true "shotgun" scope? Thanks

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  • First time mounting a scope on a shotgun for deer. Will be using slugs.Will a rifle scope (which I have a few of in my cabinet) stand up to use on a shotgun or do I need to invest in a true "shotgun" scope? Thanks

    First time mounting a scope on a shotgun for deer. Will be using slugs. Will a rifle scope (which I have a few of in my cabinet) stand up to use on a shotgun or do I need to invest in a true "shotgun" scope? Thanks

  • #2
    A rifle scope of decent quality should stand up to the recoil fine.

    The only other consideration some might raise is that rifle scopes are usually set up to be parallax-free at 150 yards, while those intended for shotguns are set up to be parallax-free at some shorter distance. For a low magnification scope though, such as you'd choose for a shotgun, and the sort of accuracy needed to plug a deer within its effective range this really makes no difference.

    What scope did you have in mind?

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    • #3
      Check your eye relief. Most shotgun scopes give you a little more and you may need it depending on the mount you use. If your eye relief is ok, I think you will find little to no difference in what parallax occurs. Recoil is significant in a slug gun, simple physics, you don't want a scope drilled into your eye.

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      • #4
        Rembo, they will all stand up to the recoil of a shotgun. My preference is for a very wide field of view on a shotgun because shots are often very close and deer may be running, especially on follow up shots. You want to pick up the sight image quickly. Something in the 1x or 2x magnification range will give you that. The longer eye relief is a bonus but you should be able get by OK in that regard with most scopes.

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        • #5
          What the other three said!

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          • #6
            DanielM, I had in mind something like a 1.5 x 5 x 32. What I'd really like after reading some of these answers is no higher than 2X but 40mm to collect more light in the heavy woods. I have yet to find anyone making a 40mm though

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            • #7
              A guy I hunt with has a quick point scope on his Remington 870 and swears by it.
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKn-jx6d2aY

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              • #8
                Use any Scope that you had mounted on a .270 or 30/06 will take the Recoil of a 12ga,Use a 2-7x36 or a 3-9x40 will do just keep the power range on the lowest number when in the Deer Woods.
                I have a 3-9x40 Bushnell mounted on my Ithaca 37 Pump, that has never gone off zero from my Slug Bbl.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Rembo View Post
                  DanielM, I had in mind something like a 1.5 x 5 x 32. What I'd really like after reading some of these answers is no higher than 2X but 40mm to collect more light in the heavy woods. I have yet to find anyone making a 40mm though
                  With your 1.5-5x32, at 5x, the exit pupil diameter would be 6.4 mm, which is probably close to all a young eye can use. The exit pupil is a measure of the diameter of the image at the eye, which can be calculated by dividing objective lens diameter by magnification. The usual rule of thumb is that 7mm is about all that a young eye can use, because that is about as great as a diameter as your pupil can dilate (it generally lessens with age). A larger exit pupil than that won't make the image any brighter.

                  You could also look at a 1.5-6x40 or 1.5-6x42. I have one of each of these (as well as a 1.5-5x20). These also seem to suit use on a shotgun, with plenty of field at 1.5x for running game close in.

                  Of course, the other factor in low-light performance is good quality lenses. Cheap scopes really come undone in poor light.

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                  • #10
                    Red dot scope all the way don't skimp on rings or rails if you have to receiver mount it. I grew up up north using them. If your to use a rifle scope low power is the way to go. Use good rings and blue loctite. And don't bother with 3 inch mags use 2 3/4 slugs the extra 100fps isn't worth the extra recoil. And u will probably find you shoot them better. Good luck. I don't envy you I hate slug guns now that I live in a rifle state.

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                    • #11
                      I ran regular 2-7X, 4X and 1.5-5X rifle scopes.
                      Anything with a min eye relief of 3" will work.
                      Yeah the parallax is set for around 150.........big deal.
                      Most folks aren't going to be running good triggers, or proper fitting stocks..........will induce more error there than what might be had from parallax.

                      Some scopes called "shotgun scopes" run thicker reticles, have longer eye relief (which probably narrows field of view).

                      Many people set their scopes up incorrectly too.

                      Get it done right and a decent scope of lower power range should work fine.

                      200 yards and in, don't think one needs anything over 7X.
                      If you're shooting that far, from a bench in the barn's hay loft across an alfalfa field.........maybe higher mag might do of use.

                      More mag means more wobble (visible). The more you see, the more you might try to fight it, make wobble worse.

                      IMHO less mag is better.

                      Plus on movers.........1-2X on the low end is pretty sweet.

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