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When cleaning my trap gun (over/under), what is the proper order of operations? I have always ran the wire brush up and down the

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  • When cleaning my trap gun (over/under), what is the proper order of operations? I have always ran the wire brush up and down the

    When cleaning my trap gun (over/under), what is the proper order of operations? I have always ran the wire brush up and down the barrel of the guns, then used cleaning patches until they come out clean. Reason I'm asking is it's a new gun and I want to make sure I always do it the right way.

  • #2
    JMO~~ A Wet patch first(Hop-9),then a brass brush,Wet Patch(Hop-9),then dry patch's.
    Good Shooting......have Fun!

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    • #3
      Thanks! I've read that moving the wire brush is bad for the gun. Any truth to this?

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      • #4
        NO, The Brass Brush is for removing leading in your Bbl, about every 500 +/- rounds is rule of thumb.

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        • #5
          Here is another tip.

          Don't over oil it.
          I had the spring inside my loaded pump shotgun freeze up during windy icy cold weather.
          I had to put the gun inside my warm jacket till the spring thaw out and pop free.
          It cost me a second shot on a standing rack buck after my first shot hit a small hidden sapling.
          Good Luck!

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          • #6
            I clean my shotguns pretty much the same way as Treestand. I just started using the Remington bore squeegee and it has cut down on the patches considerably. One word of caution, use a catch rag or container and the end of the barrels when you pull it through, there is a lot of liquid that comes out.
            Gary D, if your hunting in real cold and icy weather, then try this trick: break the gun down as far as you feel comfortable with, clean everything real good and then instead of oil, use lighter fluid and let it dry then reassemble the gun. Just be careful of plastic and nylon parts, they do not fair well with some lighter fluid.

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            • #7
              I never use a brass brush. Those were meant for the bad old days of paper wadding. A tight rag with some Hoppies on it will leave the barrel shining. You'll have to run a rag through it a couple of times. I don't bother using the rag attachment for end of rods. They won't take a rag large enough to fit tightly in the barrel of a 12 gauge. Just stuff an appropriate sized piece of cloth (or I have even used paper towel and it works fine) in the chamber and push it through. I use a couple of old wooden rods with brass fittings. They will push a tight rag down the barrel very nicely. Look for those old rods at flea markets or junk stores. Strip down the wood and stain it mahogany. Then polish the brass and cover the whole thing in a clear finish of your choice (I prefer Varathane Diamond because it dries fast and no toxic odor). Those old rods become a thing of beauty!

              See my tip of the day posted above for rags.

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              • #8
                I NEVER use so much Hoppies that it will run out the end of the barrel. That is unnecessary overkill.

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                • #9
                  Sorry, I meant to say, "is moving the brush back and forth bad for the barrel?"

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                  • #10
                    Only move the brush in one direction. Clean as others have said above and, if there is no plastic build up you probably don't even need a brush. If I have a plastic build up, I may use a stronger solvent - however, keep solvent away from wood finish. After cleaning, remove choke tube and clean threads and then treat with a 'never seize' type lube.

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                    • #11
                      I should add that I don't shoot trap, only field hunt with my shotguns. Therefore I have never encountered any noticeable "plastic build up" in the barrels. I presume this is something that occurs when firing many shells consecutively.

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                      • #12
                        Clean the ends, choke tube and chamber, and run a Tico tool through it to get powder residue out. When I shot skeet (about 6,000 registered targets/year avg.) I never cleaned barrels or tubes but the rest of the gun was spotless. If you are using Browning factory choke tubes, you might need to check for plastic/carbon fouling on the tubes, b/c they are crap.

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                        • #13
                          I should also add that I don't have choke tubes on any of my guns. So my advice might be somewhat inapplicable.

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