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How To Do It Right

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  • How To Do It Right

    Read the article by Joel Hutchcroft on how He and the other Editors use the proper Break-In procedure recommended by two of the top barrel manufacturers. Christensen Arms and E.R. Shaw have spelled out a procedure in the March issue of Shooting Times.
    The noticible advantage to a barrel break-in is less barrel fouling.

    Note: This article is for the believers who follow recommendations, to those who do not partake in recommended break - in need not reply.

  • #2
    I'm sure that the folks like Ernie and D'Man that sail thousands of rounds downrange every year at targets and p-dogs and are concerned with superb accuracy, are concerned and do break-in procedures.
    I'm with you pighunter.
    The average Joe who buys a new rifle and will only shoot 8 to 10 rounds a year through his lifetime isn't concerned with "barrel break-in".

    My grampa bought a Marlin 336. First centerfire rifle he had that wasn't a government issue!
    The man NEVER bought a full box of ammo. A local hardware store would break a box of ammo.
    When he got down to 2 shells, he would go buy 7 more.
    The man could kill deer at 200 yards with his iron sight .30-30.
    He was not the least bit concerned with barrel break-in and killed 2 deer with 2 shots every year.

    Comment


    • #3
      Sounds like it’s worth a read thank you. I’m contemplating buying another new rifle in .223 so I can get grandsons behind one practicing.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by PigHunter
        Well, I'm replying anyways. I don't break in barrels. The deer and pigs never seem to know one way or another
        The idea was to not defelct the thread. thanks.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by PigHunter
          Read the article but it was short. One method uses 50 rounds of shooting and cleaning to do the break-in. My point is this should not be required for a medium to big game hunting rifle. For example, in 11 years, I've put less than 20 rounds through my .45-70 and that includes sight-in and dropping 5 animals.
          That sounds about right PH. Just to save time and expense, heck just buy a used gun.........easy peasy 🤪 !

          Comment


          • #6
            I’ve read barrel companies and some gun builders have come up with break in procedures because they’re tired of having to answer questions about it. Otherwise they wouldn’t bother.

            Jim, you’re as guilty as anyone of hijacking threads. Even your own sometimes.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by PigHunter
              Read the article but it was short. One method uses 50 rounds of shooting and cleaning to do the break-in. My point is this should not be required for a medium to big game hunting rifle. For example, in 11 years, I've put less than 20 rounds through my .45-70 and that includes sight-in and dropping 5 animals.
              Go tell it to Hutchcroft, I was trying to get a rifle discussion started on this feckless site.

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              • #8
                I sometimes do and sometimes don't so I'm not sure I'm allowed to comment. I do a 20 round break-in for over-the-counter factory rifles that tend to have pretty rough un-lapped bores. This usually fills the tool marks with copper and shaves off burrs. I don't break in premium barrels that have been lapped and have bores with a mirror finish. I also shoot around 100 rounds or so before competing with a barrel if I intend to use the barrel in competition or need exceptional long range accuracy. I find significant bore changes generally occur in the initial 100 rounds, even with a finely lapped barrel. The velocity consistency required for long range accuracy usually gets better after the first 100 rounds.

                All barrel manufactures have an opinion on this and they don't all agree, primarily because all their barrels aren't the same. I will also note that if you are trying to plug a deer at 100 yards or less, it makes no difference whatsoever. If you are trying to hit a p-dog or woodchuck consistently at 1000 yards, it may make a difference.
                Last edited by DakotaMan; 01-04-2022, 04:41 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I use the Weatherby recommended procedure. I made a post once of a kit I have that fires special bullets coated with lapping compound - three grits. I think I got it at Gander Mtn. never used it, kinda thinking I would use it if I had a real bad Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0955.jpg
Views:	210
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ID:	788794 bore. The kit has a sticker on it that looks like it might be Midway. the steel bar is what you spread the compound on then roll the bullet between the two bars.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    No complaint, new threads on here usually get quashed even before a post ever gets started.
                    I had one the other day. A follow up article that was critized because ithe topic had already been posted long ago. So, no follow up because nobody wants to learn if there is anything to update. Too bad. People need to go with the flow instead of being so contankerous. Add some thing positive to a post or discussion. Visiit some other sites and see how they move a thread along, woops, my bad, don't do that because you won't come back to this site.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                      Note: This article is for the believers who follow recommendations, to those who do not partake in recommended break - in need not reply.
                      This gave me the feeling that I should not comment on the thread regarding barrel break-in experience, especially if I had a divergent opinion.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        [QUOTE=jhjimbo; I use the Weatherby recommended procedure. I made a post once of a kit I have that fires special bullets coated with lapping compound - three grits. I think I got it at Gander Mtn. never used it, kinda thinking I would use it if I had a real bad bore. The kit has a sticker on it that looks like it might be Midway. the steel bar is what you spread the compound on then roll the bullet between the two bars. [/QUOTE]

                        I don't recommend using them on a premium barrel that has been properly lapped as it will likely make it worse. The Tubb Final Finish product is pretty good if you have a scab factory barrel. I did a test with it using a cheap barrel on a .224 Valkerie that had one of the worst bores I've ever seen. The factory barrel shot random groups around 2"-3" at 100 yards. I took bore pictures with a borescope after each iteration of the process using different grits. It did a remarkable job of eliminating ragged tool marks and smoothing the rifling. Group size after the process was .7" at 100 yards. This process is called fire lapping and it works.




                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post

                          I don't recommend using them on a premium barrel that has been properly lapped as it will likely make it worse. The Tubb Final Finish product is pretty good if you have a scab factory barrel. I did a test with it using a cheap barrel on a .224 Valkerie that had one of the worst bores I've ever seen. The factory barrel shot random groups around 2"-3" at 100 yards. I took bore pictures with a borescope after each iteration of the process using different grits. It did a remarkable job of eliminating ragged tool marks and smoothing the rifling. Group size after the process was .7" at 100 yards. This process is called fire lapping and it works.



                          How do you use the tub process ?

                          Comment


                          • #14

                            Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                            How do you use the tub process ?
                            You just buy the Tubb Final Finish bore lapping kit and follow directions. It is similar to the kit you showed in concept. It comes with 50 bullets separated in 5 progressively finer groups of 10 each. You start with the heaviest grit bullets, clean the rifle and then shoot the next finer grit and clean again until all the bullets are gone. The kit is available at midwayusa.com for $35.49.

                            It is similar in concept to hand-lapping with a grit impregnated lead slug. It is just faster and with less mess. Here are a progression of shots showing the same area of the .224 Valkyrie bore I did. These start before the process, middle progress and final finish to give you an idea of the effect. Notice the heavy tool marks that will hurt accuracy and be very difficult to clean and finishing with a smooth bore that will be far more accurate and will catch much less fouling.

                            Click image for larger version  Name:	Valk Rifling 1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	93.0 KB ID:	788823 Click image for larger version  Name:	Valk Rifling 2.jpg Views:	0 Size:	78.6 KB ID:	788824 Click image for larger version  Name:	Valk Rifling 3.jpg Views:	0 Size:	74.8 KB ID:	788825 Click image for larger version  Name:	Valk Rifling 4.jpg Views:	0 Size:	66.3 KB ID:	788826
                            Last edited by DakotaMan; 01-05-2022, 09:44 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post

                              You just buy the Tubb Final Finish bore lapping kit and follow directions. It is similar the kit you showed in concept. It comes with 50 bullets separated in 5 progressively finer groups of 10 each. You start with the heaviest grit bullets, clean the rifle and then shoot the next finer grit and clean again until all the bullets are gone. The kit is available at midwayusa.com for $35.49.

                              It is similar in concept to hand-lapping with a grit impregnated lead slug. It is just faster and with less mess. Here are a progression of shots showing the same area of the .224 Valkyrie bore I did. These start before the process, middle progress and final finish to give you an idea of the effect. Notice the heavy tool marks that will hurt accuracy and be very difficult to clean and finishing with a smooth bore that will be far more accurate and will catch much less fouling.

                              Click image for larger version Name:	Valk Rifling 1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	93.0 KB ID:	788823 Click image for larger version Name:	Valk Rifling 2.jpg Views:	0 Size:	78.6 KB ID:	788824 Click image for larger version Name:	Valk Rifling 3.jpg Views:	0 Size:	74.8 KB ID:	788825 Click image for larger version Name:	Valk Rifling 4.jpg Views:	0 Size:	66.3 KB ID:	788826
                              Very good photographs. Are the bullets special or supplied in a caliber specific kit?
                              Also, what brand scope is that ? I have been thinking about one but don't know how they compare.

                              Comment

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