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Worked at the bench

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  • Worked at the bench

    Rain and wind kept me in so I preped .300Wby and .340Wby brass. Between them I have 85 rounds. Now to decide what load to use? I have .338 in 200, 225, 250 and 275gr., have a box of TTX-BT in ,338 that I might try. Some are bonded and some tipped. I think the three rings on the TTX are used like a cannelure ? I like the 4831's and 4350's. Never had any luck with 'slower' powders that I have tried
    Last edited by jhjimbo; 09-05-2021, 11:57 PM.

  • #2
    Jim, do you mean you have a box of Barnes TTSX (Tipped Triple Shocks) bullets?

    If so those relief grooves are to mainly reduce pressure. The early Barnes X bullets had issues from the pure copper being “sticky”, the grooves were the solution.

    https://www.americanrifleman.org/con...ooved-bullets/

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
      Jim, do you mean you have a box of Barnes TTSX (Tipped Triple Shocks) bullets?

      If so those relief grooves are to mainly reduce pressure. The early Barnes X bullets had issues from the pure copper being “sticky”, the grooves were the solution.

      https://www.americanrifleman.org/con...ooved-bullets/
      Oh, thanks for that. I really did not want to use for a canalure. I also thought they might have been a guide for seating depth. First time to use Barnes. My bullets used are mostly Rem, Hornady, Nosler, Sierra and Winchester.

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      • #4
        My pleasure.

        While I haven’t actually loaded any monolithics yet I do have TTSX and GMX for several chamberings when I get to them.

        From what I’ve read they generally like some jump to the lands for what it’s worth.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
          My pleasure.

          While I haven’t actually loaded any monolithics yet I do have TTSX and GMX for several chamberings when I get to them.

          From what I’ve read they generally like some jump to the lands for what it’s worth.
          Weatherby has a lot of freebore when their COL spec is used. Never measured it but I guess it is necessary to control the 65,000psi pressure peak.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by PigHunter

            I had copper fouling with the original Barnes X-bullet. But, they performed well and I never lost an animal hit with one.
            I think I might molly coat them.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by PigHunter

              Barnes came out with a blue coated X-bullet but it also tended to foul barrels and semi-auto gas systems. It wasn't a true moly and they called it XLC. Apparently it didn't work as planned and thus is no longer produced.

              Since then I've trashed what was in my inventory. The copper fouling is easier to clean from a barrel than that XLC coating. I've not seen excessive copper fouling with the modern Barnes TTSX and TSX.

              Moly coats the barrel with a layer that traps moisture and will cause corrosion, or so I've read.
              I had some with the blue coating, think I shot all of them. They were advertised to reduce copper fouling.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

                Weatherby has a lot of freebore when their COL spec is used. Never measured it but I guess it is necessary to control the 65,000psi pressure peak.
                It is kind of like taking a throating reamer and wiping part of your barrel life to begin with.
                For hunting rifle and relatively few rounds down the bore it doesn't matter, but no one else does that.
                Weatherby's shoot fine for hunting, but trying to do load development and confirm drops at distance with them is horrid with the light weight barrels, especially the 30-378 and 338-378.
                I know those are excessive cartridges for pencil barrels, but I have been there and done that for some friends with three of them all together...I admit I am prejudiced against them for that type of usage.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ernie View Post

                  It is kind of like taking a throating reamer and wiping part of your barrel life to begin with.
                  For hunting rifle and relatively few rounds down the bore it doesn't matter, but no one else does that.
                  Weatherby's shoot fine for hunting, but trying to do load development and confirm drops at distance with them is horrid with the light weight barrels, especially the 30-378 and 338-378.
                  I know those are excessive cartridges for pencil barrels, but I have been there and done that for some friends with three of them all together...I admit I am prejudiced against them for that type of usage.
                  Don't they have several contour barrels available ? I think mine are #2. The 7Rem Mag Mauser with the 26" barrek is a thin contour. If you saw targets frim the Mauser with about 1" at 100, next thing I would be doing is dressing a deer, not shooting more rounds.

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                  • #10
                    I don't keep track of what Weatherby produces, but I know they have heavier contours available.
                    For most hunting even 2" at 100 yards (4" at 200) (6" at 300) will kill deer just as dead at most hunting distances.
                    Once load development and drop confirmations are done, it is not a issue for hunting with the three Weatherby's I did load development for and drop confirmations. They all shot Sub-MOA.
                    That 378 case capacity wears on you with heavy 30 and 338 caliber bullets😎
                    And it took so long for the barrels to cool back to outside temperature.
                    Like I said, I am prejudiced.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ernie View Post
                      I don't keep track of what Weatherby produces, but I know they have heavier contours available.
                      For most hunting even 2" at 100 yards (4" at 200) (6" at 300) will kill deer just as dead at most hunting distances.
                      Once load development and drop confirmations are done, it is not a issue for hunting with the three Weatherby's I did load development for and drop confirmations. They all shot Sub-MOA.
                      That 378 case capacity wears on you with heavy 30 and 338 caliber bullets😎
                      And it took so long for the barrels to cool back to outside temperature.
                      Like I said, I am prejudiced.
                      I would never argue that Weatherby does not build a very fine rifle. Not a Purdey or Winslow by any means, but still, very nice rifles.
                      I have my prejudices against Weatherby too..... and I almost bought one. Many moons back! Like 1977.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        They build a great rifle, just the ones I have used (light weight barrels and 378 case capacity), are just not my cup of tea, if I am hunting with a rifle.
                        I wish them well and great prosperity.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Ernie View Post
                          They build a great rifle, just the ones I have used (light weight barrels and 378 case capacity), are just not my cup of tea, if I am hunting with a rifle.
                          I wish them well and great prosperity.
                          Yes sir. I agree.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Ernie View Post
                            I don't keep track of what Weatherby produces, but I know they have heavier contours available.
                            For most hunting even 2" at 100 yards (4" at 200) (6" at 300) will kill deer just as dead at most hunting distances.
                            Once load development and drop confirmations are done, it is not a issue for hunting with the three Weatherby's I did load development for and drop confirmations. They all shot Sub-MOA.
                            That 378 case capacity wears on you with heavy 30 and 338 caliber bullets😎
                            And it took so long for the barrels to cool back to outside temperature.
                            Like I said, I am prejudiced.
                            I just learned the .378Wby is a totally new design by Roy. They said if anything it resembles the .416Jeff.
                            I take 3 rifles to the range. 2 cool in the verticle rack, with the action opem while I shoot the third. Does not take too long that way. On a hot day I take ammo in a cooler. I did take my IR temp guage and learned another thing. The hottes partt is not just ahead of the action, it is about another 10" down the barrel - too hot to touch is about 130deg. That 10" must be because the powder is still burning until it gets past that point. As you can tell I like to investigate science things, like how many angels can dance on the head of a pin.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Ernie View Post

                              It is kind of like taking a throating reamer and wiping part of your barrel life to begin with.
                              For hunting rifle and relatively few rounds down the bore it doesn't matter, but no one else does that.
                              Weatherby's shoot fine for hunting, but trying to do load development and confirm drops at distance with them is horrid with the light weight barrels, especially the 30-378 and 338-378.
                              I know those are excessive cartridges for pencil barrels, but I have been there and done that for some friends with three of them all together...I admit I am prejudiced against them for that type of usage.
                              Get a Labradar, it measures your speed in increments all the way down the range to the target.

                              Comment

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