Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

my grandfather has an old muzzle loading eight gage shotgun. hammers are on. missing ramrod. believe to be made in switzerland o

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • my grandfather has an old muzzle loading eight gage shotgun. hammers are on. missing ramrod. believe to be made in switzerland o

    my grandfather has an old muzzle loading eight gage shotgun. hammers are on. missing ramrod. believe to be made in switzerland or germany. what could it be worth?

  • #2
    Priceless- Because it belonged to your grandfather.

    Comment


    • #3
      It is worth any cost for you to fix it and keep it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Y'know, this is the most common question I used to hear on the phone when I worked at a gun shop years ago... and there is no good answer. In fact its a silly question. I used to tell 'em to hold it closer to the phone receiver so I could "see" it better.

        Any antique gun... or other antique for that matter... has a monetary value based largely upon condition. Rarity also enters into the picture, as does historical significance. A one-off prototype Colt revolver in nearly new condition that can be shown to have belonged to Jesse James might well be worth as much money as anyone would care to ask for it. A rusty H&R .32 that is missing the grips is worth about a dollar. Its well nigh impossible to evaluate something without seeing and handling it. Even pictures don't help much.

        A muzzle-loading eight gage shotgun "might" be worth just about anything... but it is almost certainly worth more than money because, as others tried to tell you, it belonged to your grandfather. Most run of the mill Damascus shotguns, whether cartridge loading, percussion or flintlocks are not worth all that much money and they really aren't good for much other than as an improvised door stop or anchor for a canoe. So you probably will not get much for a family heirloom that you could never replace. If you sell it, you will likely be cursed by all your relatives for selling "Grampa's gun".

        Clean it carefully, oil it up, hang it above a fireplace and insure it. If it is in good enough shape to shoot... don't shoot it. You'll probably kill your fool self and destroy a piece of history in the process.

        I'd hate to tell you how many young men came into the store with old 1898 Springfields and the like wanting to either trade for a Remington 742 or to have it modified so they could put a Tasco scope on it.

        Comment

        Welcome!

        Collapse

        Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

        If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

        And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

        Right Rail 1

        Collapse

        Top Active Users

        Collapse

        There are no top active users.

        Right Rail 2

        Collapse

        Latest Topics

        Collapse

        Right Rail 3

        Collapse

        Footer Ad

        Collapse
        Working...
        X