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  • #16
    Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
    Correct LOP is critical for fast shots at moving targets but I have always advocated that's not ethical for big game ... unless the animal has already been hit. If a scoped rifle is adjusted for shirtsleeves, it should be no problem shooting it with three layers. Might not instantly find the scope ... but it should only take a moment. And if you don't have more than a moment to shoot a big game animal, I don't think you should be shooting at it.
    OHH, I agree for the most part about running game. However, being able to make quick shots is a big advantage where I hunt. In the thick woods you may only have seconds at a walking or standing animal. I read somewhere, perhaps from Jim Carmichael, you get about 7 seconds to identify the animal, decide where to aim, and pull the trigger. Here's a quote from him:

    "The still-hunter and his quarry often recognize each other on instantly mutual terms. In one moment a deer so motionless it seems carved from stillness is bounding into flight, and there is only a heartbeat to aim and fire. This is the instant in which the much overused and misunderstood phrase "fast-handling" takes on honest meaning. I prefer the word "quick" to describe my favorite deer rifles because they are. Not just quick to shoulder, but quick on target-like pointing your finger."
    https://www.outdoorlife.com/articles...e-deer-rifles/

    In general, I take about 3 seconds from seeing the animal to squeezing the trigger. PigHuntress has been with me a couple of times when this happened and verified my time estimate. Practice at the range and in the field is the only way to consistently succeed using this method. I do a lot of range time with .22 rimfire and shoot squirrels near my house with an air rifle. But there's no substitute for shooting your large game rifle enough to be comfortable with it in a quick-shoot situation.

    OHH, you should be good with fast shots since you do so much bird hunting. I bet you don't shoot them when they are stationary on the water, ground, or in a tree.

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    • #17
      Ontario, if I may, one more thought. Arriving in Safari camp I like to have a friendly chat with PH and maybe my tracker as to my techniques, or my quirks, while shooting big game and hear any comments they may have. Doing this before the heat of the moment may save confusion. Examples, I normally fire very quickly after mounting my rifle, so hissing, “shoot, shoot” in my ear serves no purpose as I have shot hundreds of big game. Remind the tracker to stand still even though he may be excited, I have had one bump the sticks just as I fire. When does the PH prefer you to chamber a round? It is his choice. Does he have any preferences as to techniques? Asking his opinion in advance, shows respect for him and helps prevent misunderstandings.
      Years ago, I believe in the Savannah of the C.A.R., I fired a borrowed 375 into the shoulder of a Western Cape Buffalo previously wounded by a poacher, the bullet was faulty and blew up hitting bone. The bull whirled and charged from the side from behind undergrowth trees. When he he cleared the trees I nailed him dead from a kneeling position. The trackers had never seen a charging animal shot from that position and were so excited I could have run uncontested for tribal council. They expected me to stay on the sticks. The recovered poachers round was made from a car battery terminal. Forgive me if this is a repeat

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Happy Myles View Post
        Ontario, if I may, one more thought. Arriving in Safari camp I like to have a friendly chat with PH and maybe my tracker as to my techniques, or my quirks, while shooting big game and hear any comments they may have. Doing this before the heat of the moment may save confusion. Examples, I normally fire very quickly after mounting my rifle, so hissing, “shoot, shoot” in my ear serves no purpose as I have shot hundreds of big game. Remind the tracker to stand still even though he may be excited, I have had one bump the sticks just as I fire. When does the PH prefer you to chamber a round? It is his choice. Does he have any preferences as to techniques? Asking his opinion in advance, shows respect for him and helps prevent misunderstandings.
        Years ago, I believe in the Savannah of the C.A.R., I fired a borrowed 375 into the shoulder of a Western Cape Buffalo previously wounded by a poacher, the bullet was faulty and blew up hitting bone. The bull whirled and charged from the side from behind undergrowth trees. When he he cleared the trees I nailed him dead from a kneeling position. The trackers had never seen a charging animal shot from that position and were so excited I could have run uncontested for tribal council. They expected me to stay on the sticks. The recovered poachers round was made from a car battery terminal. Forgive me if this is a repeat
        The owner will be up north with my partner hunting buff and sable. Not sure which PH I will wind up with. I'm pretty sure it won't be the one Gary had last year. A local kid who was a bit of a problem. Preoccupied with his domestic issues (married to a tramp).

        I will definitely clear up when to chamber a round. Some PHs, as I understand it, are okay with hunter having a round chambered during a stalk ... IF the hunter is experienced. I'm certainly not going to argue the point. But I will come equipped with plenty of visual evidence to confirm I am experienced. This outfitter prefers the front and back style shooting sticks (supporting fore end and butt). I tried one at Gary's and don't care for it ... at all. Maybe a better idea for someone with limited (or no) experience who gets overly wound up at the sight of game. Again, I have enough experience, even with being excited, to manage fine with regular shooting sticks (though I would prefer the traditional leaning up against a tree if one is available). But you are correct, it is his choice. However, from what I know of the owner, I suspect he will probably make it my choice.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Happy Myles View Post
          Ontario, don’t forget to practice shooting off the sticks. Just familiarize yourself so you find position comfortable for you. Find out if your PH will have bipod or tripod. You can cobble up something with pvc. If you wait until you are looking down the sights at an animal you will wish you had practiced a bit. For example if you insist on a sling it may get in the way. The thought, gee, do I want the sticks far out on the forearm or next to the receiver. Believe me you will wish you had. Do not worry about long shots, the PH will not allow it. Oh, doo not take sticks with you, way too much trouble and you want to use what the tracker is familiar with anyway.
          My partner has bought a set of the fancy front and back sticks the outfitter uses (but I seem to recall they offer optional conventional sticks too). I tried them when I was last up to see Gary and didn't care for them at all. For one thing, they are very fiddly getting into position to shoot. I believe he has conventional sticks too and I'll give them a go when I'm up again this week. Spending some time at the range is, as I understand it, obligatory once I arrive at the lodge. I will do my best to get used to sticks both here and there before hunting begins.

          For whatever reason, my partner has convinced himself that he needs to stuff those fancy sticks into his gun case with two guns. I have suggested otherwise (pointless since the outfitter uses exact same thing) but he seems adamant. I think once he tries to shove all that stuff into one double gun case, he'll change his mind.
          Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 08-01-2019, 01:31 PM.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by PigHunter View Post

            OHH, I agree for the most part about running game. However, being able to make quick shots is a big advantage where I hunt. In the thick woods you may only have seconds at a walking or standing animal. I read somewhere, perhaps from Jim Carmichael, you get about 7 seconds to identify the animal, decide where to aim, and pull the trigger. Here's a quote from him:

            "The still-hunter and his quarry often recognize each other on instantly mutual terms. In one moment a deer so motionless it seems carved from stillness is bounding into flight, and there is only a heartbeat to aim and fire. This is the instant in which the much overused and misunderstood phrase "fast-handling" takes on honest meaning. I prefer the word "quick" to describe my favorite deer rifles because they are. Not just quick to shoulder, but quick on target-like pointing your finger."
            https://www.outdoorlife.com/articles...e-deer-rifles/

            In general, I take about 3 seconds from seeing the animal to squeezing the trigger. PigHuntress has been with me a couple of times when this happened and verified my time estimate. Practice at the range and in the field is the only way to consistently succeed using this method. I do a lot of range time with .22 rimfire and shoot squirrels near my house with an air rifle. But there's no substitute for shooting your large game rifle enough to be comfortable with it in a quick-shoot situation.

            OHH, you should be good with fast shots since you do so much bird hunting. I bet you don't shoot them when they are stationary on the water, ground, or in a tree.
            At this point in my life I don't want any animal badly enough to take a running or fast shot (unless it is already hit). I am a better than average wingshot but am not foolish enough to think that qualifies me to be anything exceptional with a rifle at a moving target. Shotgun or rifle I am methodical not hasty. In fact, I am perhaps our club's slowest follow-up shooter at skeet and clays. Nowadays as often as not I drop to low gun for second target in a true pair double.

            I will shoot a grouse on the ground or in a tree. No problem. They don't eat any better shot out of the air. I only shoot waterfowl on the water if they are crippled. They are actually much more vulnerable as they jump into the air.

            Comment


            • #21
              OHH; We have a couple camping pads, hadn’t considered those. I’ll bring at least one along even if we just lay the guns on it.

              PH; We also use empty chamber indicators for or rimfire league. They’re just lengths of trimmer line that you can slide in the action. I’ll cut a couple extra to keep in the range bag. Good idea to use at home anyway to keep up the routine.

              Comment


              • #22
                Ontario, if the PH uses a tripod, flick the single stick toward the animal, quickly spread the two rear sticks with the V at wishbone level, plop the forearm solidly into place and you are close to being ready. Practice at home dry firing, if the crosshairs wiggle adjust your position and try again. It quickly will be second nature. Most PHs insist on using them, so do not fight city hall. Most trees have too many low branches covered with thorns and the grass usually too tall to sit or kneel. I am getting the feeling you have more experience than the gunsmith.
                Last edited by Happy Myles; 08-01-2019, 02:55 PM.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Ontario, I am sure you have thought of this, but make sure your new hand loads will cycle through your magazine

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I don't shoot birds on the ground LOL.
                    Will shoot moving deer, no big deal really (they're usually close).
                    Do find some guns more reflexive than others.
                    Never shot at a bounding deer, only flat line travel ones.
                    Proper gun fit makes it easy.

                    FWIW my dad's range bag has punches, brass hammer and other minor gunsmithing tools in it..........proly weighs 50#.
                    Not kidding.

                    Whatever has screwed up in the past, well the stuff to fix it is in there now. Dunno if he's had to do the same repair twice LOL.

                    But he's saved the day for others at the club more than once.



                    Last edited by CD2; 08-02-2019, 10:27 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I do take Allen wrenches and a screw driver set in my range bag.
                      Tape, targets and extra ear protection too.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Still hunting..............some I've had time, waited for the critters to offer a decent shot, not knowing I'm there.

                        Others were "oh crap, boom".

                        The high pressure quick stuff is fun. But so fast it's short on detail.
                        Having time, waiting for the shot to come........is also fun. Just different.

                        Of course, having time means some folks overthink it and screw it up.

                        They their own worst enemy.

                        Having the sausage made, the mount on the wall...........before the trigger is pulled is not a good thing.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          You have most of what you need. I watch for spending hours in the sun. Bring plenty of water, a good hat, maybe a long sleeved light shirt if you are not accustomed to being in the sun all day sun screen. Bug spray is critical. Light clothing with light shoes. Bring along whatever you intend to use as a rest for long shots. You really can't shoot beyond 200 yards without a rest. Be sure to try whatever techniques you might use. I usually shoot over a back pack, leaning against a tree or a fence post, over a rock and I sometimes bring a light weight Harris bipod if I know longer range shots are likely and I will be sitting over a clearing for a while. I don't typically use a range finder for shots out to 400 yards because all my rifles shoot flat enough for a reasonable estimate. If you are not accustomed to seeing elk, deer or whatever you are shooting at 300 and 400 yards, cut a couple of cardboard squares the height of their body and stand them out at those ranges. You can get a visual on the look and you can see just how they fit in your reticle so you won't need a range finder. You usually don't have time to fiddle with a range finder while hunting at those ranges anyway so you may as well be prepared for a quick, yet predictable shot. Check the drop at those ranges... my rifles are are zeroed for 200 and hit about 6-7" low at 300 and 14-16 low at 400. If your carboard squares are the exact size of your game's body, you can shoot a few into them to see how much holdover you need relative to the top of the animal's back. I would aim with the horizontal reticle even with the animal's eyes at 500 if I didn't have holdover increments on the reticle.

                          Have fun and enjoy your range visit.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            So can anyone suggest a good camping tent that's durable and weatherproof no matter the seasons? I've read a lot of reviews and good ones too like at https://www.camp4.com/ and I just would like to hear what you use. My top option so far is the Abco Tech Portable Cabana tent...
                            Thanks a lot!

                            Comment

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