Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

We had a beautiful win model 70 in 300 win mag crack thru the grip shooting it off a weighted led sled this past weekend. Can't see it in cell pics but all of us can clearly in sunlight. Has figured grain in wrist-grip area not straight. Is the probl

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • We had a beautiful win model 70 in 300 win mag crack thru the grip shooting it off a weighted led sled this past weekend. Can't see it in cell pics but all of us can clearly in sunlight. Has figured grain in wrist-grip area not straight. Is the probl

    We had a beautiful win model 70 in 300 win mag crack thru the grip shooting it off a weighted led sled this past weekend. Can't see it in cell pics but all of us can clearly in sunlight. Has figured grain in wrist-grip area not straight. Is the problem the led sled or failure waiting to happen? Crack is on both sides of grip so repair dicey. Think rifle is mid 70's model. Black tip and Monte Carlo . Thoughts?experience?

  • #2
    That's a bummer to hear! It sounds like a combo of both the lead sled and an already hairline crack. I stopped shooting off a lead sled purely due to my zero never being perfect once I shoot from my bipod. If you love the stock, contact a local gunsmith and definitely don't try the repair yourself. Good luck!

    Comment


    • #3
      Hmm, I guess it depends on if you want to try and save the stock or not.

      My advice would be to see if you like the Hogue or someone else makes a synthetic that you like.
      https://www.hogueinc.com/stocks/winchester/70

      For the Ruger M77 MkII I did this with a buddy and it was a drop in process and it shot better than before even though the rifle had been glass bedded.

      Had another buddy with the same model rifle in .338, and it had crack along the grip, and that was without a lead sled. A very talented gunsmith out in Bridgeport, MI (you might know him dewman) was able to use a vacuum process to get a dye-able paint-able epoxy into the stock. He was then able to sand off if there was any excess, and match the colors. You have to look really close to see where the crack was, and it was sizable.

      As to the root cause, probably with enough shooting this would have happened anyway, but lead sled probably exacerbated the issue. Happens sometimes, wood stock get hidden knots or weak spots for whatever reason.

      Good Luck!!

      Comment


      • #4
        I had heard Weatherby would not guarantee their rifle shot on a lead sled. Just makes sense, no give in the sled.

        On yours, a skilled person may be able to insert some strength rods from the receiver end. That plus a lot of epoxy might save the stock.

        Check the sites for possibly a used stock from someone that went synthetic.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Buckshott00 View Post
          Hmm, I guess it depends on if you want to try and save the stock or not.

          My advice would be to see if you like the Hogue or someone else makes a synthetic that you like.
          https://www.hogueinc.com/stocks/winchester/70

          For the Ruger M77 MkII I did this with a buddy and it was a drop in process and it shot better than before even though the rifle had been glass bedded.

          Had another buddy with the same model rifle in .338, and it had crack along the grip, and that was without a lead sled. A very talented gunsmith out in Bridgeport, MI (you might know him dewman) was able to use a vacuum process to get a dye-able paint-able epoxy into the stock. He was then able to sand off if there was any excess, and match the colors. You have to look really close to see where the crack was, and it was sizable.

          As to the root cause, probably with enough shooting this would have happened anyway, but lead sled probably exacerbated the issue. Happens sometimes, wood stock get hidden knots or weak spots for whatever reason.

          Good Luck!!
          If he does replace I'm sure he'll go on line and try to find a used original. He was to pissed off at the time to discuss it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
            I had heard Weatherby would not guarantee their rifle shot on a lead sled. Just makes sense, no give in the sled.

            On yours, a skilled person may be able to insert some strength rods from the receiver end. That plus a lot of epoxy might save the stock.

            Check the sites for possibly a used stock from someone that went synthetic.
            Think I will and might buy it as a present . Think him and his wife's 30th coming up. But it was my sled. Would that be construed as some kind of guilt that maybe I knew it might happen. I didn't .

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
              I had heard Weatherby would not guarantee their rifle shot on a lead sled. Just makes sense, no give in the sled.

              On yours, a skilled person may be able to insert some strength rods from the receiver end. That plus a lot of epoxy might save the stock.

              Check the sites for possibly a used stock from someone that went synthetic.
              Saw your S-M in another post. If it hasn't been in a gunfight Friday it sure should be. Beautiful

              Comment


              • #8
                It's been my experience with Led Sled & xx & xxx Walnut Stocks it brings out the weak Spots in Hard kicking Rifles 45year old Gunstocks. That would not happen if in a Syn Stock. I use Boyd Gunstocks for replacement Stocks for Rifles,Lever Guns,Shotguns. He carries stocks up to XXX wood and 100% Drop-ins with Finish & checkering. Check him out.(605)996-5011

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have a 300 M70 with an overly figured stock, similar to what you describe. I am having issues with warpage of the wood, which eventually I just decided to forget about as it is stable now. The biggest problem was between my ears. Anyway.

                  I was in conversation with a gentlemen that specializes in stock work. Link below. He recommended that I reinforce with a custom-made walnut dowel, rather than metal rod. he also said that he could repaid a broken stock very well. Based on the conversation and his reputation, I believe him.
                  send him an email. I thought his fees were very good, and you keep your own stock.

                  http://www.thestockdr.com/contact.php

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Amflyer View Post
                    I have a 300 M70 with an overly figured stock, similar to what you describe. I am having issues with warpage of the wood, which eventually I just decided to forget about as it is stable now. The biggest problem was between my ears. Anyway.

                    I was in conversation with a gentlemen that specializes in stock work. Link below. He recommended that I reinforce with a custom-made walnut dowel, rather than metal rod. he also said that he could repaid a broken stock very well. Based on the conversation and his reputation, I believe him.
                    send him an email. I thought his fees were very good, and you keep your own stock.

                    http://www.thestockdr.com/contact.php
                    PS: Lead sleds are good ways to break stocks in anything that recoils much. I shoot a 458 Lott, 375 H&H and lightweight 338 from the bench with no discomfort using a bag of shot between my shoulder and the buttstock. It soaks up the recoil, spreads the recoil over a larger surface area but still moves back and isn't a "dead stop" like the sled.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I don't care what year model, lead sleds are hard on wooden stocks...and the wrist is the weakest spot.
                      If you need a lead sled to sight in your rifle, you need a different rifle!
                      I've been plastering these pages for years with "anti magnum" rants. LOL!
                      Get a .30-06 or .308 if you've gotta have a 30 cal and get a little closer...or hunt smaller game. There is NO game animal east of Big Muddy that require Magnum performance.
                      The great bears of the Rockies and west need big, heavy bullets as in .45-70, .444 or .450 Marlin.
                      The world's largest carnivore on Kodiak Island is most often taken with a .45-70.
                      That's because most of them are shot at halitosis ranges.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A problem inherent to Lead Sleds. Gunstocks have been developed to shoot from the shoulder, which "gives" under recoil. Lead Sleds don't "give", to absorb the recoil like a shoulder does, and this greatly increases the stress on the stock. Incidentally you'll also tend to bust a stock if you put the butt on a wall and fire it, for exactly the same reason.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Dewman, black tip and Monte Carlo, that might not be a factory stock??

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Buy a synthetic stock or find a pro on gun broker. If they don't have pics posted of there work find another one. And don't expect a guarantee. But if you can get one get it. That's why I didn't buy a lead sled I use a primos group therapy rest and let slide on the bench a little.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks for the feedback fellas. He's monitoring this post and hasn't made up his mind but is checking out the stock doctor site he saw on here and he's bought stocks from boyds before. He wants me to be sure and say the led sled was my idea. He wasn't grouping as well as normal and wanted to use my bore light to see if he had bad copper buildup and I said," what the hell, it might be you. Let's grab my led sled I use for turkey shell testing and see." He says he's really sure it was a factory original stock. Gun might be late 60's- early 70's. He's not original owner. I'd never heard this happens before. Said to tell firstbubba he has hunted moose and elk and plans to hunt moose at least once more.

                              Comment

                              Welcome!

                              Collapse

                              Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                              If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                              And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                              Right Rail 1

                              Collapse

                              Top Active Users

                              Collapse

                              There are no top active users.

                              Right Rail 2

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Right Rail 3

                              Collapse

                              Footer Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X