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Ok, so today I went out and shot my new Ruger American Rimfire .22 rifle for the first time. I had shot my friends open-sighted

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  • Ok, so today I went out and shot my new Ruger American Rimfire .22 rifle for the first time. I had shot my friends open-sighted

    Ok, so today I went out and shot my new Ruger American Rimfire .22 rifle for the first time. I had shot my friends open-sighted .22 a couple times before, so I had an idea of what I was doing. Note: I also got a scope to mount on the gun, which I applied, but did not line up the sights or anything (Did I need to?). Anyway, I shot about 30 rounds, at a target about 70 yards away, from a raised platform roughly 6 feet high. Theres was a slight (and I mean VERY slight) breeze. After I finished shooting, I went to the target, only to find ZERO bullet holes. I know the bullets were firing, because the mag was emptying and the empty shells were exiting the gun. So, what was I doing wrong???

  • #2
    Rifles do not come from the factory "sighted in"!
    With a .22LR, start at 12.5 yards. Final sighting should be at 50 yards.
    I've killed crows, rabbits and other small critters out to 100 yards or so with a .22, but a .22 is most effective inside 50 yards.

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    • #3
      You failed to "line up" the cross hairs of the scope with the bore of the rifle.
      You need to set the rifle up in a cradle so it does not move while you look through the bore at a distant target. Then adjust the cross hairs until they coincide with the same point on the target.
      Now you will have the rifle bore-sighted. Your shots should be on the paper, and you can make final adjustments to the scope that will allow you to print all your shots on or near the spot the cross hairs are placed on the target.
      You can use an old cardboard box for a cradle by cutting a "V" notch in the top of opposite ends.
      Good luck.

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      • #4
        For a terrible explaination of ballistics, remember this. The further that your bullet travels the further your bullet is dropping. At 70 yards your bullet drops about 18 inches when shooting 29 grains bullets, but only 9 inches shooting a 40 grain bullet. Very basically, because the bullet is heavier it travels further. There are a ton of factors involved in shooting, but in short, because you've yet to sight in your rifle and your distance may be greater than intended for your caliber, you missed. If you don't sight in your gun, your barrel is looking one way, while your scope is looking another. It may be beneficial to you to have a friend who is very familiar with guns help you sight it in for the first time. Good luck.

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        • #5
          The absolute best thing you could do right now is to find a mentor. You are scaring me a little with the extent of your ignorance---and that's not a put-down because ignorance simply means that you don't know, not that you're stupid or unwilling to learn. The fact that you are on this forum is testament to your quest for knowledge, but you would benefit the most by having somebody show you stuff about firearms and not necessarily just about scopes. I envy you in the pleasure you will be discovering in the world of shooting/hunting.

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          • #6
            ryen DO find some one who will teach you how to sight in the scope and let you take the steps to get it right..... for you. By that I mean your zero may not be the same as my zero, and besides when this comes up again, and it will, you will know what to do. Another thing to do is have a spotter watch the target and tell you where the bullet is striking if it does not hit the target.

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            • #7
              You could take your firearms to a sporting goods store and for a small fee they would boresight your rifle for you and then you could start at 10 yards and fire your rifle from a steady rest and follow the directions that were supplied with your scope on aligning the scope. This should get you started, but as mentioned the best way would be to find someone to show you how it is done.

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              • #8
                Best bet is take it to a gunshop and ask them to bore site it for you...and ask them what they are doing so you will have an understanding of what is going on here. Ok after they have it bore sited..take it out to the range and shoot at about 50 yards and you should be on the paper, then make your adjustments and dial it in till all shots are in the bullseye (depending on your marksmanship lol) Good luck!

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