Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Got a kick out of reading DEP's review of the new Rem 783 in this month's F&S. Has anyone shot this beast? What do you think?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Got a kick out of reading DEP's review of the new Rem 783 in this month's F&S. Has anyone shot this beast? What do you think?

    Got a kick out of reading DEP's review of the new Rem 783 in this month's F&S.; Has anyone shot this beast? What do you think?

  • #2
    It seems that Remington has figured out that solid bedding really helps accuracy. Epoxy and aluminum pillars are really quite inexpensive and they REALLY help. DEP makes the barrel rifling sound a little rough but it can't be too bad. It does seem to me that it might be difficult to keep clean and therefore sustain accuracy but we will see.

    I really like the idea of the Savage-like barrel nut so we can crank other barrels on ourselves. Gunsmith prices are going through the roof for installing a Rem 700 barrel. If aftermarket product producers jump on this like they did the Rem 700, we might have a winner here. I'd love to have a rifle that allows me to screw in the barrel of my choice before throwing it in the truck. But then I guess I could just buy a Savage.

    Comment


    • #3
      Dakota; Allow me a stupid question. These screw on barrels how accurate can they be. With the advent of modern machining are we going backward for the sack of versatility. That really does not matter with the versatility of factory loads. Excuse me if I did not make myself clear. But alot of loads will sufice a guy on a budget. With an all around 30 caliber. An extra barrel buys alot of ammo. JMHO Thank you!

      Comment


      • #4
        I read the article, and wasn't too impressed. My Savage 111 is just as accurate at a lesser price. The neat thing about differance between the Savage and the Remington is each rifle has what the other doesn't. For example, the 783 had a good stock and bad barrel, my Savage 111 has a good barrel and a bad stock. So If you were to put a rigid stock on a savage you'd probaly get awsome groups.

        Comment


        • #5
          Carl, good question! All barrels screw on and these can actually be very accurate as long as they are good barrels and the stock is well bedded. You are dead right that with a highly versatile cartridge like the 30-06 or the 25-06 and the variety of modern bullets and powders available, you can effectively participate in many different shooting applications with one barrel.

          I like experimenting though and things like a .22 CHeetah (e.g. see the amazingly accurate bullet hit in your scope before the recoil moves it), a 6mm PPC (e.g. see if you can put five through the same hole), a 10 twist .375 with BIG VLDs (e.g. get a little 2000 yard practice) or a .35 Whelen (e.g. thump elk and deer in heavy brush) are of interest to me among others.

          Once a Savage or Rem 783 is properly head spaced, the barrel nut can be locked in place on the threads with JB Weld. Then it is easy to screw it off, replacing it with another favorite barrel without even removing the scope. I would be interested to see if all the 6mm PPC shots still go through the same hole at 100 yards. I hypothesize that they would. I for one would rather spend my money on good, well chambered barrels and good well tuned ammo than on a stack of expensive rifles that cause me to buy a bigger and more expensive safe.

          I theorize that is why few rifle manufacturers use barrel nuts. If it were common enough practice such that all Americans figured this out, there might be only 2 million instead of 5 million+ Rem 700s in America... and the Chinese Army would actually have more rifles than Americans do.

          Comment


          • #6
            M.A.T., you are dead right! You can glass/pilar bed your stock as a home project for about $30 using bedding materials from Brownells, midwayusa, etc.. You might be surprised how accurate it could be. You are also able to do the barrel switching I discussed above. There is a great article on 6mmbr.com that explains just how to do this with your 111 Savage but it would work just as well with the 783.

            Comment


            • #7
              Look folks! Face it! A barrel nut on a bolt rifle is about as handsome as a Pily Choke on a vintage M12 Win! It works just fine, it just ain't "right"!
              I'm as skeptical of interchangeable barrels as you would be of a gunsmith wirh a bench outfitted with Crescent wrenches, Channel-Loc pliers and a couple of sets of Vise Grips! LOL!
              I get the T/C Contender etc, but screw on barrels?
              If it's a concept whose time has come? Okay, go for it!
              But please excuse me while I remain the skeptic!

              Comment


              • #8
                PS
                I like the fact that hunting accuracy can be obtained without breaking the bank!

                Comment


                • #9
                  FirstBubba, a + for you. I also like accuracy that won't break the bank an welcome every advancement.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Haven't read Petzal's review yet, but I read the review in December's American Hunter mag. The 783, with three different loads using three-shot groups, averaged groups smaller than one inch.

                    In the same issue, AH reviewed the new Sauer 101, which I've become interested in. Using the same protocol, the Sauer averaged groups just under 2 inches. This is not the groupings I've seen from other reviewers for the 101, which runs $1,699. Of course, there are many features on this rifle that are highly desirable.

                    However, for the 783 to get such groups for about $450 is pretty amazing. Getting positively reviewed next to a rifle that costs nearly four times as much is remarkable.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The Remington 783 is a Cheap Charlie's delight; A fugly cheap rifle that shoots well. Tools from Harbor Freight or Tool Town are just as good as Snap-On, right? Hey, a 9/16" socket is a 9/16" socket! LOL

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        WAM, it seems that each of us has a different perspective. Harbor Freight and Tool Town seem to be doing quite well. Perhaps because those who tighten one nut a year find that they could hire a certified mechanic to come over and tighten their nut for less money than required to buy a set of Snap-Ons. The cheap 9/16" socket looks like a real bargain by comparison. They probably won't use it enough to skin their knuckles using it like you and I might have.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          WAM
                          Ever had a bolt whine because it was tightened by a Harbor Freight socket instead of Sears Craftsman? ...Snap-On? ...vise grips?

                          Basically, I agree with you, but the $ difference between Wby and Rem is a tad more than between a Snap-On socket and a Harbor Freight socket!

                          As a poor boy, I have to find the "middle ground"!
                          If a 1/2 ton Dodge p/u will get me to town and back, why buy a Cadillac?
                          The Caddy cost twice as much, looks nice in front of the store, but it doesn't get me to town and back any quicker and with cheaper monthly payments, I can buy more fuel to travel!
                          Don't have a problem with the Caddy, I just prefer to spend less money.
                          BTW! I had a shot at a '65 Ford Falcon, but let's face, there IS a difference between cheap-skate and just tight!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            DakotaMan and FirstBubba,
                            I was not drawing a comparison between the 783 and a Weatherby of any flavor. As for the "middle ground", I own way more rifles and shotguns that cost me less than $500 than i do those that cost more than that. I'd probably buy a 783 or Ruger American if they came in an interesting caliber that I did not already own.

                            If you had a shot at a '65 Ford Falcoon, I hope you did not miss....

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              WAM

                              ROTFL...CGU!

                              What do you consider an "interesting" caliber?

                              Comment

                              Welcome!

                              Collapse

                              Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                              If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                              And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                              Right Rail 1

                              Collapse

                              Top Active Users

                              Collapse

                              There are no top active users.

                              Right Rail 2

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Right Rail 3

                              Collapse

                              Footer Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X