Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What late model, current manufacturer firearms do you think will achieve a position of 'classic' in 50, 75 or 100 years. A repu

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What late model, current manufacturer firearms do you think will achieve a position of 'classic' in 50, 75 or 100 years. A repu

    What late model, current manufacturer firearms do you think will achieve a position of 'classic' in 50, 75 or 100 years. A reputation like the 'sweet 16, Model 12, Model 70, Citori and Superpoised, 1911, '94,Model 99, etc. Will there even be any 'classics' from today's firearms? Or, will they just be museum pieces for people to look at and think how crude they are compared to what they will have in 100 years?

  • #2
    It's not brand new, but I think the various knock-offs of the M-16 in the past 10 years or so will become a 'classic' in 50+ years. Ammo will probably be far superior to what we have now but I bet the basic design will continue to evolve for many years to come.

    Comment


    • #3
      I honestly think it will be hard to get to that look back and think something is classic. Mainly because I look at what it is about those that made them so.. They weren't CUSTOM $3000-5000 firearms. They were mass produced, but they were mass produced with craftsmanship. Touched by hand, followed from start to finish. And if you look at firearms that are made today with that effort, we still appreciate them as being amazing, but they're only found in those ridiculously high end type firearms. So you won't look back and call those a classic, you'll call those a well made custom firearm. There will probably be an exception or two. I mean there's some gun makers who produce a semi-custom for under $1500. Those might hold that potential. But I just feel like a "classic" should be something that was produced without special intentions, that ended up being special.

      Comment


      • #4
        As far as longevity. I would say the Mauser bolt action rifle in one form or another. The AR-15 and lastly the AK-47 just by shear numbers.

        Comment


        • #5
          Good points SD. It is hard to imagine how materials like carbon fiber, Graphene, nano tech and caseless ammo, will affect weapons in the future and leave current firearms to the museums. Will they even release a projectile? Maybe it will be a ray or particle beam - set phazers on stun and stop a Elk at 1,000 meters.

          Comment


          • #6
            Marlin long guns. Especially those without the "hammer-block" safety.
            The 336's and 39A's more so than their heavier calibers.
            That crazy accurate little Marlin M60 comes to mind. Not a "barn burner", but darn sure a fine little rifle.
            Look into off key stuff, like Remington's Nylon 66 and Mohawk series.
            When Bill Ruger was alive, he would walk into the factory and specify non-cataloged "specs". If the public clamored about it, he put it in the line. If not, you simply had an uncatalogued Ruger rarity.
            Ruger No. 3's. Short lived! Still popular!

            Comment


            • #7
              Ya gotta git up outta the less expansive guns for a classic any more.

              Kimber, Krieghoff, and Merkel immediately come to mind.

              Comment


              • #8
                How can a Savage 99 not be considered a classic?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Tikka T3. Out of the dozens of rifles I've owned, it earned a favored place faster than anything else, customs included. I like it better than my A7 or 85s, all from parent company Sako. Recently Wayne Van Zwoll,who is recognized by many as today's premier rifleman in the hunting world, wrote an article about rifles and it was pretty clear that the Tikka is his favorite for many applications. Wayne is incredibly versed in rifles and has experience with most hunting models made in the past 100 years, so I take his opinion seriously.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    jhjimbo as usual that is a very good question: Possibly the Blaser and Merkel switch barrel rifles or the NULA's. Nosler, Cooper Arms, Weatherby. These are all high quality, excellent fit and finish rifles that I don't see everyday in my local gun store. But these are not necessarily the guns for the common man. In terms of innovationation but not necessarily classic I would add the AR's and Glocks.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm with SDWH on this one.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have not shot one, but the Kimber m84 rifles I have handled sure seemed like heirloom pieces to me. Someday I hope to pass a couple on to my kids after a few years of enjoyment myself.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I would have to say the Remington Model Seven its past its 25th Anniversary Date by 8 years and going strong. I bought one new in 1981 in a walnut checkered stock in 7mm-08 with a 18.50" Bbl
                          they had not made any in 20" or 22" at that time, the 18.50" are as Rare as Hen's Teeth!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I own a modern built Browning 1885 High Wall in 30-06. I do not know if it qualifies being over a 100 years old already. But it is timeless in it's graceful lines. It gets compliments just standing in the rack at the range.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              You know what I'm going to say.... The timeless Weatherby Mark V Deluxe is already a classic and will be long after they are no longer made and the only thing with the Flying W will be Vanguard and imported shotguns.

                              Comment

                              Welcome!

                              Collapse

                              Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                              If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                              And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                              Right Rail 1

                              Collapse

                              Top Active Users

                              Collapse

                              There are no top active users.

                              Right Rail 2

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Right Rail 3

                              Collapse

                              Footer Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X