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Here's a more specific follow-up question to my last question. If I take my scope of the bases with the rings still on will the

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  • Here's a more specific follow-up question to my last question. If I take my scope of the bases with the rings still on will the

    Here's a more specific follow-up question to my last question. If I take my scope of the bases with the rings still on will the effect my POI much.

  • #2
    Sorry, I meant that efffect my POI much instead of the effect my POI much.

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    • #3
      It is possible the POI will change some. If you remove the top half of the rings and the scope, and then put back together it will be close, but probably not exactly as it was before it was removed.
      If you want to be able to remove and replace, for example to be able to use iron sights, get quick detachable rings and they will return to zero every time. They cost more, but will do the job if that is what you want.

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      • #4
        Im most cases it will change the poi and you will need to seright your rifle. I am mildly surprised that your gun shot such small groups with loose screws.

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        • #5
          Yes! Metal bends. It may be slight and invisible but still there. Some metals torque than others When you put the scope back on the amount of tightening (torque) on the screws all vary sightly from the original setup. That variation will show up in your accuracy. It may be close but it will be there.

          Very expensive scopes and ring (I hear), may bot have that issue as the metal is hardened to avoid all that stress.

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          • #6
            Last deer season my Son and I were hunting outside Baudette MN. After a rainy day in an uncovered deerstand, I decided the bore of his .243 rifle could use a couple patches and some CLP. I forgot to bring a cleaning rod, so I ran into a local store and bought a 6mm bore snake. Back in the motel room, I managed to get the bore snake completely and hopelessly lodged in the bore of the rifle.

            With the help of a couple locals, I was able to track down a gunsmith/blacksmith at his shop several miles outside of town. He was a very nice fellow and helped get the bore snake out of the gun. He didn't even make fun of me, to my face at least, even though I'm sure I deserved it. The removal process required a good bit of dis-assembly, barrel and action from stock, scope rings and scope removed. There were two very large and sturdy vises involved, heavy leather gloves and a giant dose of elbow grease.

            It turns out, the "6mm" labeled bore snake labeled package contained a 7.62mm snake. Cleanest that bore has ever been once we got it out.

            We thanked the man, who refused any payment by the way, and took the re-assembled rifle back into the field to test fire it and sight it in. It was still perfectly zeroed in after all that and we clanged the small steel target 3 for 3.

            I learned a few lessons that day, among them; 1. Don't forget a cleaning rod. 2. Never use a bore snake. 3. Ruger rifles have a sweet scope mounting system.

            So, in the case of this rifle, a Ruger M77 MKII, the scope can be removed and reinstalled without loosing zero. At least it worked once.

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            • #7
              I was just wondering because as I already said in my previous post that the front ring was loose, and since the rings and bases were factory installed I thought the bases might be be loose, but I didn't want shoot a box of ammo re-zeroing.

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              • #8
                I think the reason for it shooting so accurately is because the rear rings might have been tight enough to hold the scope securely. There are scopes that mount with only a rear ring (cantilever).
                Nonetheless, I would get better rings (and/or bases), and then before hunting take it to the range to ensure it is still on paper.

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