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Would you, for the benefit of the ones not acquitted with bullet drop, give us a chart showing the drop of different rifles such

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  • Would you, for the benefit of the ones not acquitted with bullet drop, give us a chart showing the drop of different rifles such

    Would you, for the benefit of the ones not acquitted with bullet drop, give us a chart showing the drop of different rifles such as: 30/30, 30/06, 7mm, 8mm, 762-39, and 243, if sighted in at 100 yards, drop at 200 yards and etc. Since here in Indiana we can not hunt with a rifle, could you include 20, 16 and 12 gauge, if sighted in at 50 yards the drop at 100 and 150 yards, muzzle loaders, 45, 50 and 54 calibur. The same yardage as a shotgun.

  • #2
    Ah dunno.

    Ah wuz acquitted.

    Those who wuzzn't cannot possess a firearm.

    Butt try this:
    www.hornady.com/ballistics-resource/ballistic-chart

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    • #3
      Great reference bayouwoof!

      This would be an immense project given all the permutations with a dozen cartridges, several yardages for each and different ballistics for as many as a dozen different weight/contour bullets for each. In general, you will see that among the rifles, the faster bullets drop less than the slower ones. All of the center fire cartridges listed will be fine for deer within a hundred yards. The 30-06, 7mm and 8mm will all dispatch deer effectively out to 400 yards given the right bullet weight and an accurate rifle. This longer range shooting is where you really have to concern yourself with the drop characteristics of your specific load.

      The 30-06 is probably the most versatile of these for deer hunting, yielding top notch performance from fast light bullets to heavy brush busters. For deer hunting out to 500 yards, the .25-06 and the .270 are common cartridges that provide exceptionally flat shooting deer stoppers.

      Among your cartridges, the 30-06 and 243 are capable of propelling deer sized bullets at relatively fast speeds, especially if you use the a good 130g 30-06 bullet traveling about 3200 fps.

      Among the shotgun slugs and black powder bullets, they all move relatively slow and drop like a brick after a hundred yards. Their accuracy is also relatively poor, so taking a shot beyond about 120 yards presents a large element of unpredictability. They are intended for close range shooting and all have similar big drop characteristics after that range. If you use one of them for deer hunting, you should study the chart above and then test bullets in your gun at the various ranges.

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      • #4
        If you are technology adept enough to find and post on this site, you should be able to find one of the many ballistic calculators free from ammo, powder, and bullet manufacturers. Tough to post a chart on here...

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        • #5
          Them boyz kin properly prescribe pills to precipitate the undoing of ungulates!

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          • #6
            Kim,
            You can find all of that information in a Nosler reloading manual or as WAM suggested go to either Hogden, Alliant or Nosler's website.

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            • #7
              If you use Nikon scopes, Nikon Spot On (google it).
              I find the Nikon software reasonable to very accurate. Site in at 1 yardage and it will give you ballistics data all through the curve.

              They also make the app for your android and iPhone, so if you are stranded in WhoKnowsWhere, Alaska and the the local ammo store don’t have your favorite ammo, you can sight in and then dial up what they do have.

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              • #8
                Good idea Rocky. That is the main reason I'm using a Nikon Monarch with the Spot On software for elk and muley hunting this fall. On 8x magnification, I have perfect aiming points for 300, 400, 500 and 600 yards given my 30-06 168g TTSX hand load. The Spot On software defines it and the field tests prove it. Since it is a second focal plane scope, the holdover points change for a specific load change as you vary the magnification.

                My long range scope is a first focal plane scope so I do the same calculations with ballistic software using an MOA graduated reticle. I know the specific drop mark for each yardage out to my 1000 yard maximum so I can get a quick but accurate shot off regardless of the magnification I happen to be on at the time of the shot opportunity.

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                • #9
                  Dakota; You can also print out the chart at whatever size you want and tape it (using clear water proof packing tape of course) to your stock. I print the cross hair chart (along with with the drop and energy chart) so I can decide if that long shot has enough energy to make that kill. That way you don’t have too much to remember if you change rifles during the season.

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                  • #10
                    Rocky, another good idea! That is what I do too. Before long I may also have to hang a magnifying glass on my rifle so I can read that chart. My reading vision has gone to pot and when it gets really cold, my reading glasses can cause problems. First I have to dig for them and second, they fog over. This isn't much of a risk with the Nikon scope and only 5 aiming points (I DO have to aim 4.5 inches high of the 300 yard circle with my load). It IS a problem with my long range MOA scope though as I can't remember all the windage and drop dope out to 1000 yards.

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