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This is sort of a branch off question on my last one. What are the pros and cons of a .300 Winchester Magnum vs. a .300 Winchest

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  • This is sort of a branch off question on my last one. What are the pros and cons of a .300 Winchester Magnum vs. a .300 Winchest

    This is sort of a branch off question on my last one. What are the pros and cons of a .300 Winchester Magnum vs. a .300 Winchester Short Magnum? Range, accuracy, velocity, whatever. The answers I got on my last question made me start to rethink my decision. I guess that is what this is for though.

  • #2
    I have heard some reloaders complain about the short neck on the .300 WinMag. Don't know about the WSM.

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    • #3
      I have been reloading my 300WSM for several years, 7 I think and I have never had a problem with the short neck. The heaviest bullet I have loaded is a 180 grain bullet. I haven't done any long range shooting (400-500 yards) so I can't comment on that aspect of the question. My 300WSM is super accurate with 150 grain, 165 grain, and 180 grain bullets. According to the manuals the velocity is about the same on the two until you start getting up to the 200 grain and 220 grain bullets and then the 300 Win Mag has the edge.

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      • #4
        Chewie

        First, I have an affinity for off beat calibers.
        Second, I have absolutely NO use for a "magnum" anything.
        Third, I personally don't (won't?) shoot at any game animal at extended ranges.
        But that's just me.

        Look into the ballistics of the .300 H&H Magnum.
        All the other 300 mags have belted cases simply because the shooting American public thinks a magnum requires a belted case. Not true!
        The .300 H&H Mag is the only 30 cal case that actually requires a belt!
        It's an old timer, but in modern rifles and modern propellants, it's a dandy!

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        • #5
          FirstBubba- I probably won't ever shoot at any game past 100 yards in my area. There just aren't that many places that deer would be that I could shoot that distance. But, I want to be able to shoot longer ranges for things like elk or bear or antelope or any other game I might have to shoot at long ranges if I ever go hunting in a far off place. I also would like to tinker with long/longish range target shooting.

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          • #6
            Ya-cant go wrong with a .300 H&H One dam fine Caliber! I would own one, if I had some use for one.I let one pass in a Pre-64 Win Mod/70.300 H&H.

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            • #7
              Well Chewie, the H&H has won the Wimbledon 1000 yard match, so I'd say it is a viable long range target candidate.
              It was developed about 1920 from rhe .375 H&H case.
              It's a bit much for smallish whitetails but is adequate for anything in North America.

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              • #8
                Well Chewie, the H&H has won the Wimbledon 1000 yard match, so I'd say it is a viable long range target candidate.
                It was developed about 1920 from rhe .375 H&H case.
                It's a bit much for smallish whitetails but is adequate for anything in North America.

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                • #9
                  Chewy,
                  I also own a 300 Winchester Short Magnum, as well as my 300 Win. Mags. It is a fine cartridge. I normally use heavy for caliber bullets, 180 and 200 grain bullets because I hunt In Africa quite a bit, where you do not know what you might run into on any day. I have found the heavy bullets to be more versatile as they do not seem to blow up little animals at short range and deliver the mail to big animals at longer ranges. With these heavier bullets the 300 Win Mag seems to be easier to load and to perform a little better than the short mag. However, using today's new bullets such as the Barnes Triple Shock, I have found you can go with a little lighter bullet. For example 180's rather than 200 grain. Think you will be happy with either caliber if you do not mind the recoil. Kindest Regards

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                  • #10
                    Probably should add a comment or two on the 300 Win Mag' short neck. From the time it was introduced, gun writers have been critical that the short neck, when using the heavy bullets, forces the bullets to be seated too deeply into the case, somewhat limiting case capacity, and restricting proper case/bullet tension. This criticism has caused me to tinker with larger 300s, for example the Rem Ultra Mag which has lots of case capacity. I do not use muzzle breaks and found the vicious recoil too much for my tender body with less accuracy than the 300 Win Mag.

                    For Eastern Whitetail, either Win Mag are more than you need, but if you decide to step up to a 300, you will be happy with either the 300 Win Mag or their Short Mag.

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                    • #11
                      These cartridges are comparable in performance. I'd give a very slight edge to the WSM cartridge in terms of performance since this modern case design tends to produce a more consistent bullet velocity from shot to shot. Both are about equal in velocity with the WSM producing a little less recoil for the same weight rifle and shot velocity.

                      Both are extremely flexible cartridges if you hand load, handling 110g varmint bullets to 215g bullets well. If you neck size the WSM you end up with an extremely accurate cartridge although the .300 Mag does quite well in long range accuracy too. Both will give you plenty of energy to deck an elk at 600 yards and might be accurate enough to shoot 3" groups or better at 600 yards if you have a premium barrel.

                      You will enjoy these more if you reload using mild loads for target shooting and varmint hunting. Reserve the monster hot loads for elk/big bear hunting. A LimbSaver butt pad and a removable muzzle brake assist in reducing felt recoil in these stout magnums. You can target shoot or varmint shoot with the muzzle brake but remove it when you are hunting so you don't damage your ears.

                      I went to the .300 Dakota when making this decision myself for RUM-like velocity combined with WSM-like accuracy. If I had to choose between these two, I'd personally take the WSM for accuracy and reduced cost of reloads (about 10% less powder for same velocity as the .300 Win. Take your choice though as there is barely discernible difference between them and they are both great cartridges.

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