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I'm thinking about reloading and I was wondering if somebody could give me a basic list of tools and supplies I might need? Than

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  • Safado
    replied
    I can't add anything to jhjimbo's response, he's spot-on!

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  • Happy Myles
    replied
    A lot of good advice here before I arrived. I have used many different products, particularly because some of my very long cases, 416 Rigby and 500 Jeffery, prefer the Redding Arbor. You cannot go wrong with RCBS basic kit. Additionally, their customer service line is friendly and hard to beat. Kindest Regards to All. Just got back last night from an exhausting, but successful Cameroon trip, fun catching up this morning

    Leave a comment:


  • Edward J. Palumbo
    replied
    My bench is set up with an RCBS Rock Chucker for resizing operations and the Junior at the other end of the bench for bullet seating. My dies are a variety of Redding, RCBS and Hornady dies, depending on the cartridge. I seem to gravitate toward Redding dies for my varminters. My tools and accessories are an accumulation of 40+ years of "stuff" that migrated onto the bench. I get lost in there!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sarge01
    replied
    I just received a Midway flyer and they have the Rock Chucker Deluxe kit for $319.00. It also includes the manual. All you need to start loading is powder, bullets, primers and brass and an experienced reloader to show you how it is done and to give you lessons for the first 5oo rounds or more that you load and then you may start to get the hang of it.

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  • FirstBubba
    replied
    A little, shall wr say, "off the cuff" advice.
    The more loading you do, the less you trust others reloads, no matter just how accomplished/skilled they are.
    If anyone ever offers me reloaded ammo, I graciously accept, take 'em home, pull the bullets, toss the powder, deprime/resize and check tje bullets for weight consistency and shoot them at targets.
    I learned the hard way. A "friend" offered me some ammo for my No. 1 Ruger. I noted it was a bit difficult to chamber, having to push pretty hard to get the action to close. Thank goodness the doe died instantly, because the empty was firmly jammed in the chamber and WOULD NOT extract.
    Back at camp, I asked if he used a full length resize die.
    "Oh, no!' came the reply, "I only neck size my brass. Less stress on the brass and it cycles fine in my bolt gun."
    Single shot arms require tighter tolerances than bolt/lever guns.
    Semi auto weapons require SB (small base) dies to successfully digest reloads. SB dies resize mere thousandths tighter that even factory spec to insure 3F! (3F - Feed, Fire, Function! An absolute "MUST" for an auto loader!)
    As you progress down the reload road, more of this becomes more clear?!
    Worked with a guy who decided he didn't need to buy a .357 Mag revolver., a magnum powder charge fit very comfortably in a .38 Spl case! ...and indeed it does!
    That afternoon, Wayne's very nice little S&W Chiefs Special bit the dust! Only by the Grace of God did he escape with more than a minor laceration to his trigger finger!

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  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    A Rock Chucker would be a bit more than what's necessary to get started. I have my dad's RCBS Jr press and its held up fine for over fifty years. A C-type press is fine for a beginner. A more expensive O-type (Rock Chucker) would be recommended for someone who plans on doing a LOT of reloading. I agree, buy used. Pretty hard to screw up a scale, powder measure, and press. There's typically many good used ones on the market so that stuff is usually cheap. Perhaps buy the dies off the shelf if you can. Depriming pin might be broken on a used set, adjusting ring might be missing, threads buggered, etc. A gun show is a great place to pick up stuff, particularly loading literature. Personally, I think it's more fun to shop for yourself rather than buying some kit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Treestand
    replied
    JMO~~ pick-up a DVD from Hornady..The ABCs of Reloading..$6.00 with Book. Then you decide what Press you can afford( LEE-Loads all)Kit is under $150.00 +your Primers,Power,Lube,Bullets,+ your cases.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    I used to sit and watch a hunting buddy reload for hours and must have asked him a million questions. Rifle and pistol cartridges were my main interest.
    Getting a set up from an individual is a great way to go - gets you going quickly and can save a lot of money. Reloading equipment does not usually wear out, rust is the only enemy that can shorten the life of a component. I never had an interest in loading shotgun shells, that is a whole other operation. Another decision I made was for a single stage press that was all I needed - progressive press is for higher production levels.
    Read the ABC's of Reloading and pick up some reload manuals(used are o.k.) like Hornady, Lee, Nosler,Sierra, Lyman and read them. When you get going do not experiment on your own - follow the load data to the letter. Keep records of everything you do. Manuals will have suggestions of how to set up records of loads. Do not take load data from a friend without thoroughly checking it out - what is good in one gun may be a disaster in another. Be safe.
    I found I did not save so much money as I was able to do twice as much shooting for the same amount of money.
    Prices have gone wild lately so this is a good time to get started. Pick a caliber and go for it. Any question along the way, don't hesitate to ask F&S - lots of experience on this site.
    Good luck and happy shooting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sarge01
    replied
    My suggestion would be the RCBS Rock Chucker reloading press kit. It contains everything that you will need to get started except the dies, powder , bullets, primers and brass and a manual. There are others but I have had a RCBS Rock Chucker for over 45 years and it has never let me down.

    Leave a comment:


  • Edward J. Palumbo
    replied
    Major manufacturers (RCBS, Hornady, Redding, etc.) offer start-up kits that include press, scale, dies, manual, and assorted accessories. While a good choice, I recommend purchasing (used) presses and scales at a gun show or check e-Bay, because the savings can be significant.
    FirstBubba brings up a very good point. If you can purchase a trusted friend's equipment, or receive guidance from an experienced handloader, you are well ahead of the game.
    One of my presses was purchased 40 years ago. Properly cared for, they last generations, so it's not a matter of purchasing new presses every so often. Some of my dies (they're dated by year) are decades old also.
    There is no end to the accessories, the devices that save you time and effort, and they seem to accumulate over time, so I dare not estimate the cost of what's sitting on my bench.
    I also started with a Lee Loader, which (at the time) was $8.95, but a year later purchased a press and never regretted it. If I couldn't reload my brass, much of the enjoyment of shooting would be missed. It's very satisfying to get good results with YOUR ammunition.

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    I started loading .41 Rem Mag because a box of fifty cost nearly $20!
    I hammered out many a round with that Lee Loader!
    Later, Mitch showed me his RCBS "C" frame press.
    Years down the road, guy I knew got his fanny in a crack and sold me his RCBS Rock Chucker "O" frame press, O'Haus "Dial-a-Grain" scale, bench mounted powder dump, bench top priming tool, case trimmer, powder trickler and 2 or 3 sets of dies. All for $100! Best money I ever wasted! LOL!
    That was about 1979. One of the die sets was a 38/357, 3 die set with carbide sizer that cost nearly $40 then!
    With the carbide sizer, you don't have to lube the cases. When you're loading 300/400 pistol rounds, cutting out lubing is a major time saver!

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    Oh AAM, talk about opening a can of worms!

    The "cheapest" way to get into reloading is a Lee Loader.
    You'll need the loader, a case lube pad, case lube and a small fiberglass mallet.
    Then you'll need supplies. Brass, bullets, primers and powder.
    Assembly required!
    The next step up would be a bench top "press". NOW you're talking money. Start up kits run upwards of $400/$500 !
    From hard experience! ...reloading does NOT save you money! ....BUT, you get a LOT more bang for your buck. Reloading saves anywhere from 60/80% on ammo.

    Leave a comment:


  • I'm thinking about reloading and I was wondering if somebody could give me a basic list of tools and supplies I might need? Than

    I'm thinking about reloading and I was wondering if somebody could give me a basic list of tools and supplies I might need? Thanks and have a safe and happy fourth of July.

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