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New from Savage"Long Distance"Carriers,This could be your new Rifle. #1 M110 FCP HS Precision, .338 Lapua,#2 M111 Long Range Hun

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  • New from Savage"Long Distance"Carriers,This could be your new Rifle. #1 M110 FCP HS Precision, .338 Lapua,#2 M111 Long Range Hun

    New from Savage"Long Distance"Carriers,This could be your new Rifle. #1 M110 FCP HS Precision, .338 Lapua,#2 M111 Long Range Hunter, 338 Lapua. #3 M110 BA,338 Lapua. This is for the Guys that Hunt Zip Code to Zip Code, What say you?

  • #2
    Check them out on www.savagearms.com/m110

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    • #3
      I think 500-600 yards is the farthest shot you should take on an animal. and even then you should take everything into account, such as wind, terrain, what the animal is doing, whether or not you have a good rest, and so on. I myself am not capable with shots this far. I am talking about people who can shoot very well and are very competent. My personal maximum range that I am capable of shooting is not very far, but far enough for coyotes, foxes, etc. I completely blew a shot on a running fox at 80 yards the other day. offhand, though. it was trying to get our chickens.

      I don't like seeing videos of elk and deer being shot at a 1000 yards. just not sporting or ethical because the animal doesn't even have a chance of hearing or sensing something is wrong. rifles like that are nice and would be good for long range competition.

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      • #4
        At seventy five years of age I cannot remember my own zip code let alone the next one. I have fired a custom 338 Lapua, indeed an accurate rifle from the bench with a rest. It was a sight to behold, a six inch muzzle break, and have no idea how much it weighted. If I had it transported afield, would feel obligated to fire a warning shot into the air before unleashing it on an unsuspecting animal.

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        • #5
          I think the best application for rifles in that caliber is the military, where the shooter doesn't care much whether he kills or wounds his target.

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          • #6
            You can have too much of a good thing. I just stepped up and purchased a long range rifle; a .340 Weatherby and doubt seriously if it will be used over 300 yards on big game. The minimum powder charge for the .340 is higher than the max charge for a .338 Win Mag. .338 Lapua exceeds the case capacity of the .340 Weatherby. Without a muzzle break the recoil will be fierce! No thank you!

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            • #7
              These are likely to be pretty amazing rifles for the $1,200-$1,600 price range. The barrel and chamber cut is EVERYTHING in long range shooting though so it will be interesting to see how well they do. With the outrageously rising price of ammo, these will be a little like ripping up $20 bills while you hunt. They should shoot long range pretty well with the addition of a $1,000-$2,500 scope.

              For those that are interested in long range hunting or target shooting, these should be one of best deals available in that chambering. So far, most of those I've seen shooting the .338 Lapua seem to have a tough time hitting accurately because of their flinch or their reluctance to buy a few hundred rounds of ammo to practice.

              One poor fellow was actually crying big tears in his dissappointment over his $5,000 investment. It pained him so much to shoot that he couldn't finish his prized 20-round box of ammo. Another was so careful of the expensive ammo, that he waited about 20 minutes between shots and the variable wind was killing him. He didn't understand wind and he had nothing to measure it. He had a real tough time hitting a 10 inch target at 500 meters.

              We have a lot of military practicing for the Camp Perry matches at my range though so I've shot alongside a few military shooters who really knew what they were doing. We the people buy all their ammo and they get lots of practice with very good training. Some shot quite well and would have little trouble shooting prairie dogs at 1,000 yards very consistently. Something with a sweet spot as large as an elk's would not present a challenge.

              I suspect that when hunters were predominantly shooting round balls in their smooth bore rifles, they thought shooting game at 100 yards was unethical. Nowadays, most hunters don't seem to think that is the case. As people's tools advance, the ethics remain but the distances increase. I expect those interested in pure sport to continue hunting with primitive weapons and getting real close while those hunting for dinner will sharpen their aim and learn to take very accurate and highly predictable longer shots when necessary rather than eating tag soup.




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              • #8
                I like the Fact that Savage has put a Fair Priced Rifle in many Calibers 308,30~06,300Win Mag,338Win,338 Lapua. out their, In a platform for the Guy that wants a 500,600 Yd shot(Not my cup of Tea)I'm a 250Yd shooter.When lucky
                But as Time goes on Rifles get better weather we like it or not.

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                • #9
                  I am not into super long range shooting but i did take a tour of the Savage web site. The .17WSM B-Mag rifle is now in their literature - has anybody seen one? I am considering one.
                  The product video's are really well done. I was surprised at the cleaning procedure for a muzzle brake - carb cleaner.
                  Anyone looking for a firearm would do well to visit web sites like Savage and the other manufacturers, they are loaded with information.
                  I had the Model 99RS in .300sav with quick detachable Griffin & Howe scope mount some time ago but sold it. I am left handed and the safety on the model I had was on the right side of the lever. Not easy to operate.

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                  • #10
                    jhjimbo: My local Rep:Bert said they will be out by Late April early May and in W*M by July/August(hes not always right)???

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Sorry to come off sounding negative about new developments.
                      I have the utmost respect for the quality and capabilities of Savage rifles, but the .338 Lapua cartridge was developed for the military as a long range sniper round. In 2009, the longest confirmed sniper kill was made by a British sniper at 2,707 yards with the .338 Lapua.
                      Its sporting applications are very few, with its 250-grain bullet at 3,000 fps being overkill for all but the most dangerous African game, and even there its effectiveness is borderline on the short side.
                      JMHO.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        99, contrary to popular belief, the ballistics on the .338 Lapua ane not that different than the .300 Weatherby that has been quite popular in hunting circles for some time. Here are comparisons with my .300 Dakota which is slightly quicker than the .300 Wby:

                        .300 Dakota
                        210g bullet; 3100 fps; 1605 ft/lbs at 900 yards

                        .338 Lapua
                        250g bullet; 2800 fps: 1626 ft/lbs at 900 yards

                        This is at top loads with Berger VLD long range bullets at a G1 B.C. of .631 and .682 respectively. If you consider 1500 ft/lbs enough to deck an elk, they will both do the job at 900 yards. Both would kill an elk at 1000 yards sinch they both just drop below the 1500 ft/lb Mendoza line at that range. But I can sure tell you which one has the greater RECOIL. I consider both to be highly effective in elk hunting to 600 yards or beyond if so desired. With good equipment and lots of practice, that is a very possible hunting scenario.

                        My calculator has them both going under 400 fps at 2700 yards but I sure wouldn't want to get hit by either of them at that speed. There is considerable luck in hitting a target with either of them at that range since they both transition the speed of sound with erratic results at about 1000 fps.

                        I suspect that in the U.S., the .338 RUM will probably outsell the Lapua, but time will tell. They are so similar in performance that it difficult to distinguish them against each other by any measure ohter than cost of ammo.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sorry... speed of sound around 1100 fps depending on atmosphere. Bad fingers!

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