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As a retirement gift from the US Navy, I am considering purchasing a Winchester Model 70 Super Grade in .270 Win. I prefer a 22

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  • #16
    Thanks for the great posts!

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    • #17
      Congrats Navy, I retired in 1990 from the Army. Still waiting for the wife to buy me a Winchester.
      If you reload you can mitigate the muzzle blast and loss of velocity somewhat by using a slightly faster burning powder. Something like IMR4350 or H4350. Avoid the very slow stuff like H1000, etc. A chronograph is useful for this job also. If it were me I would stick with the factory barrel as cutting will definitely degrade value regardless of how well it is done.

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      • #18
        Is it really worth taking the chance of screwing up a barrel? I'd go with the 24 over a 22.

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        • #19
          Bench rest shooters have proven that 22" (actually 21 3/4") barrels are optimum for accuracy at 100 yards and that is what you will see on the 100 yard line. This barrel length has minimum flex for best shot-after-shot consistency. However, if you are buying your Ruger for bench rest shooting, you will be sadly disappointed because their barrels are not likely to be competitive when running against Krieger, Bartlein, Broughton, etc.

          In these tests, given the exact same barrel contour, the difference between 22 inch and 24 inch barrels will be measured in a couple thousandths of an inch at 100 yards. When you actually choose the best weight/contour for each length, they are quite similar in accuracy.

          In hunting applications I recommend a 24" barrel because in a .270, bullet speed is much more important than .002" grouping improvement at 100 yards, especially with hunting bullets that are not capable of that fine level of accuracy. If you want more shot-after-shot accuracy in a hunting rifle, get a heavier contour barrel.

          The M70 Ruger .270 24" barrel will make a very nice rifle for most hunting applications out to 400 yards. I would only use the 22" if I were in brush so thick that walking was difficult. If I were in that situation, I would be using a .35 Rem rather than a .270.

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          • #20
            Navy,
            I would stick with the factory barrel length. Barrel taper is set for the intended length of the barrel, so it will look like a pug if you cut it.

            Del,
            You should have asked for a Weatherby. I did and got a Mk V Lightweight Sporter .30-06!

            Navy, thank you for your service!

            WAM, USN Ret

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            • #21
              Thanks for all of the excellent input. I have decided to stick with the 24" barrel.

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              • #22
                No advice, but I do want to thank you for your service and I wish you a long and happy retirement.

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