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Hey guys, I am looking into buying some new gun care products and need some help on which route I go. It will be especially impo

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  • Hey guys, I am looking into buying some new gun care products and need some help on which route I go. It will be especially impo

    Hey guys, I am looking into buying some new gun care products and need some help on which route I go. It will be especially important for rifles from .22 to .300 win mag. I like the idea of the tipton fiber rod for I do not want to scratch rifling. But the otis cleaning kit as caught my eye but I am not sure if would be ideal for hunting rifles. Then again it might be. What do you guys think? Carbon fiber rod or the cable pull method of the otis system? Out of the two what would be ideal for rifles?

  • #2
    I prefer the cleaning rods myself and the fiber rods are sure better for your rifling than steel or brass. I like to be able to push a brush back and forth from the breach end of the barrel for a good cleaning. I use CR-10 to melt copper fouling quick and Hopps #9 for cleaning powder residue. Most of these solvents do a better job if you can brush them back and forth in the barrel a few times.

    I like the cable pulls at the range or a p-dog town to dust the barrel every 10 shots or so to keep the bore smooth. If you have an autoloader, the cable pulls are easy to use and I take advantage of them for that too. I don't like to push a rod in from the muzzle end on a rifle because of the risk of crown damage.

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    • #3
      Thanks again DakotaMan.

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      • #4
        I prefer the Otis systems over rods because I feel that it does a better job and they come with some good tools.

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        • #5
          I use a rod with a patch on the tip of a brush with Hoppe's #9 to take care of powder residue. After that, i use a Bore Snake with an oiled patch wrapped around the brush section of the Snake with some J-B non embedding bore cleaning compound on it. All cleaning is done from the chamber so the material of the rod is not a factor.
          After cleaning i run a patch wet with Remington oil to protect bore for storage.

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          • #6
            The Otis and Bore Snake are Great for your Hunt-Camp or Glove-Box in your truck/car, A Rod is best for a more Compleat Cleaning Job to remove led/copper fouling.
            my 2Cents

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            • #7
              I prefer a rod for thorough cleaning. The other thing is the cables are time consuming if you are doing a full cleaning and a someone said you can't scrub in both directions. I have Bore Snakes that I take to the range and on hunting trips.

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              • #8
                I use both, depending on the firearm. I do like how compact the Otis system is, to take with you on trips,I use my rods at my cleaning bench. for my bench, I bought a stainless steel kitchen prep table, I can work standing or on a stool, and using the puppy training pads cleanup is a piece of cake!

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                • #9
                  I just bought a bore snake and I love it. cleaned the barrel up great. And i got some breakfree CLP. all in one spay. I like it better than the rods.... but thats my own opinion. good luck tho

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                  • #10
                    As Petzal said and I agree, the Bore Snake is about as useless as the U.S. Congress for copper removal from a rifle bore. Otis is right up there too. Both are better than nothing at all, but next to it.

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                    • #11
                      My process is similar to Dakota Man except I don't srub back and forth. I use fiber coated one piece cleaning rods and a bore guide. I only work from the chamber end never from the muzzle to avoid damaging the crown. I brush only from the bore toward the muzzle remove the jag or brush and brush again. I use Hoppe's No. 9 to clean powder and lead fouing. I use Barnes CR-10 or other solvents like Butch's Bore Shine to remove copper fouling. When a patch passes through clean I run a patch with Rem Oil and I'm done. I tend to use strong solvents in lieu of back and forth scubbing or brushing.

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                      • #12
                        The trouble with plastic cleaning rods is that particles of grit can easily become imbedded on their surface and act as an abrasive on your muzzle and bore.
                        I prefer hickory or brass and use a muzzle guard.

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                        • #13
                          I'd go with an Otis or a Brownells rifle cleaning kit/ system, Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber and finish with BALLISTOL Sportsman's Oil. All good stuff IMHO..

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