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hey guys im looking to get into hunting and shooting and i dont have anyone around to teach me so does anyone know of some good

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  • hey guys im looking to get into hunting and shooting and i dont have anyone around to teach me so does anyone know of some good

    hey guys im looking to get into hunting and shooting and i dont have anyone around to teach me so does anyone know of some good books that can teach me what i need to know? im thinking of getting a .22 to start.

  • #2
    Great choice with that, D'arcy! Get a .22 very close in both weight and feel and looks, to your ideal deer rifle. Then put a decent scope (3-9 or 4-12, and actually spend some money on it). It may seem like a big investment to buy a 300 or 400 dollar .22, but it will pay off, in SPADES.

    I personally have a Savage Mark II BTVSS, a very good looking thumbhole hole stocked rimfire with a nice, heavy stainless barrel. It's ridiculously accurate, and a good value for the dollar (if you search it up, Dave Petzal wrote a review on it that made me want to have it lol).

    All in all, its what you put into it, and what you get out of it, that counts.

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    • #3
      I can't post the website address for the model (the website is saying it is obscene?!?!?!) but another good view of them is on the website that sells an aftermarket stock for them that I want, I'll see if I can link you there:

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      • #4
        okay, it won't let me post that either. Look up the Rhineland Arms website, searching for their Leopard Mark II stock

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        • #5
          congrats on your choice to get into a couple of awesome sports. If you stick around on here and be patient sorting through what may seem like boring or confusing topics, there is alot to be learned from a lot of knowledgable folks. Feel free to ask questions, and great choice on the .22, keep in mind not to shoot it above the tree line, a .22 will travel up to a mile and a half if aimed in the sky! It's a small game caliber, and also of the rimfire breed, apposed to centerfire, google the difference and it might be a small start on some education.

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          • #6
            A Good Start in the Shooting and Hunting Sport is with a Hunter Safety Course! in your State,"Knowledge" is Power! Welcome to F&S Q&A.

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            • #7
              FNG,
              Delete everything to the left of the www to post.

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              • #8
                A .22 is good for small game. What are thinking about hunting and make sure to take a hunter ed course. I'm glad you are interested in starting to hunt. Welcome.

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                • #9
                  Great choice of a start up firearm! I would just get on the internet and research like crazy the game you want to hunt, what type of gear you will need, and tactics to harvest your game. What game are you interested in hunting by the way? And also, I couldn't agree more on the hunter safety course! Hunting is actually a very safe sport, but as in everything accidents do happen. And a firearm/hunter safety course can help you avoid serious accidents.

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                  • #10
                    As far as books go, take a look at David Petzals Complete Book Of Hunting, and The Total Gun Manuel. Another good one is by Jim Carmichel's, The Book Of The Rifle (I think).

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                    • #11
                      Spelling. Try Manual, not Manuel.

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                      • #12
                        I have learned a lot from the internet, field and stream magazine, and outdoor life.

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                        • #13
                          "Art of the Rifle, " by Jeff Cooper.

                          Find a mentor, preferably with long-standing experience and not overly opinionated. Take a hunter's safety course, even if you aren't going to hunt for a while. Take an Appleseed course www.appleseedinfo.org/ some weekend once you are familiar with the rules and handling of your weapon.

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                          • #14
                            Now that I think about it. I recommended that you read Cooper's book and then that you find a mentor that wasn't "overly opinionated." He can be considered such, but with good cause.

                            I still recommend the Cooper book though.

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                            • #15
                              Study the options and choose a quality .22 rimfire rifle, one that genuinely appeals to you (a "keeper"). One of your most difficult tasks will be to pare your choices to one rifle, because there are so many from which to choose. I agree, the Hunter Safety course is a fine investment of your time. I still have the Hunter Safety card I received when I was 13 (and I'm 66). Never fire unless you know what's going to stop that bullet!
                              Neither my father nor any of my uncles were hunters or campers, so I certainly understand how difficult it is to get started. If you have friends through scouting or classes who are campers, spend time in the field and see what lives there, what opportunities exist there.
                              If you enjoy reading (and I hope you do), study the habits of the game animals (small or large) that you intend to hunt. Corroborate your studies with personal observation, and enjoy your time afield. I hope there's a safe, legal, convenient place for you to practice. Establish a relationship with a well-stocked gunshop and ask questions. Tell them you're just getting into hunting and don't wear their patience out by monopolizing their time, but come back from time to time to look for the rifle you want. I have a single-shot bolt action .22 rifle which I purchased 40 years ago, and I still use it occasionally for squirrels and target practice. I have others, but that rifle has taken a great many squirrels and rabbits. I say this because you need not "outgrow" the first rifle you choose or any subsequent rifle, for that matter. You will observe the basics of marksmanship and sportsmanship for the rest of your life. Be safe, or you will be lonely, because there's no latitude for carelessness.

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                              Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

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