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It only takes a scope to the forehead once to think about it everytime you shoot afterward. I know what I did wrong. I was shoot

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  • It only takes a scope to the forehead once to think about it everytime you shoot afterward. I know what I did wrong. I was shoot

    It only takes a scope to the forehead once to think about it everytime you shoot afterward. I know what I did wrong. I was shooting my friends .308 laying prone and not only is my friend much smaller than I am making his scope mounted to close to my forehead but I didnt have the rifle sholdered properly, probably due to my lack of experence shooting prone, and the scope just jumped up and got me in the forehead. Ive never had this happen before but I am looking at getting some sort of rubber protector for my scope more or less to put my mind at ease. Ive seen some on the internet. Does anybody have any suggestions on types or brands and whatnot.

  • #2
    I've never gotten a crescent cut on the eyebrow, although I've had my eyeglasses pushed back a couple of times.
    I think of that only when shooting someone else's rifle, because I have all of my own scopes set far enough forward to avert that problem.
    Even a confirmed stock crawler should not need rubber eyecups if he has his scopes mounted correctly.

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    • #3
      I was looking through a scope, that was sitting on a 7mm Remington mag, at a doe on a power-line. I wasn't going to shoot the doe, but was just observing and taking mental notes.
      After some time had passed, I asked my son if he would help me drag the doe out, as we were a couple of miles into the deep woods. It was going to be a 600 yard shot and I was aiming at the does head, I failed to re-position myself. I had bad form and the stock of the rifle wasn't where it should have been. I clothes-lined the doe and the scope hit my prescription sunglasses and I bled profusely after my lenses smacked me in my eye brow.
      If you practice good form, you won't get smacked again.

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      • #4
        Ouch! Be glad it wasn't a .300 Weatherby or similar! There are some rubber eye cups on the market and some scopes have a rubber ring on the eyepiece, but it seems to me that they would only protect from a slight bump. Many cheap scopes have shorter eye relief at higher power compounding the problem. Some scopes cannot be mounted far enough forward to utilize all the eye relief available. Set up the rifle correctly and get in proper form especially shooting prone uphill.

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        • #5
          While shooting at steep angles up or down one needs to think of the risk of getting a "Weatherby kiss" from the scope. I know a couple of hunters who practice with muzzle brakes, then hunted without them and had the same accident. Fortunately, it has not happened to me, despite hunting under all kinds of conditions, including some pretty hairy ones when one tends to be very preoccupied. I shoot scoped sighted, high recoil rifles up through 500 Jeffery. Think the secret is I shoot a lot and focus on form and good position, so good habits kick in during times of excitement.

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          • #6
            I have met many so called famous hunters from around the world in the field and at hunting meetings and shows. It is interesting to note every now and then the faint scars over the eye brows on some of them. Don't think they are dueling scars

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            • #7
              Bet you don't do that again.
              If the scope is close enough, like in a incorrect shouldering of the rifle, even with the rubber you could still get a good hit.
              To set your scope on a rifle, tape a small stick like a popscicle stick with 3 1/2" extending toward your brow. Then position scope so it just touches your brow. If necessary you can get extended rings to move the scope far enough forward.
              Take into consideration how much clothing you will be wearing and adjust accordingly.

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              • #8
                The illustrious Mr. Boddington has a couple to sport as well! LOL

                If you need a brake to shoot it, you have too much gun there, bubba.

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                • #9
                  Get a scope that has 4" of eye relief.

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                  • #10
                    [Blank]

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                    • #11
                      I have a friend who apparently had never fired a 30-06, but her cousin took her deer hunting anyways. When a doe popped out her cousin didn't notice that she had the scope right on her eye. Needless to say she has a nice scar and had to have surgery on it! I bumped myself once, but there was no blood.

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                      • #12
                        Ouch! I've done that also (once) in the prone position, and generated a greater respect for my sporterized Springfield. When I sold that rifle, I felt like I was surrendering a piece of myself with it. There was probably a tissue sample still on the eyepiece.

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                        • #13
                          I wouldn't worry about putting a rubber protector on it. I think now that you have been stung, you will be more aware and prepare for it. As Krusty says, your scope should have plenty of eye reliefe, allowing you to visualize the target best when your eye is back about 4 inches from the scope... That way, if you accidentally, sneak too close, you can see the target. You also must watch your form. Don't allow a prone position, laying over a truck, aiming straight up or down to cause bad form. If you don't have the rifle firmly against your shoulder, even a .308 can pop you. Make a special point of noting recoil in these off positions... especially with higher recoil rifles. Once they cross over something like a .300 RUM or a .375 H&H, you can count on them backing up a few inches whether you are prepared or not. Best of luck and don't feel bad. Most of us who shoot a lot, get a little too close once in their life.

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                          • #14
                            Sorry, forgot to mention... make sure your scope is mounted far enough forward to accommodate prone shots without causing your eye to be too close. I've seen a lot of scopes mounted back just a little too far and it really increases your exposure to a nasty incident.

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                            • #15
                              Thanks guys. I think I have identified the problem. Sounds like most of you are saying it was due to not enough eye relief. I kinda figured. Like I said it wasn't my gun.

                              Comment

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