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This is a question for shotgunners. I have been shooting trap for a while now with a remington 870 wingmaster. My average score

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  • This is a question for shotgunners. I have been shooting trap for a while now with a remington 870 wingmaster. My average score

    This is a question for shotgunners. I have been shooting trap for a while now with a remington 870 wingmaster. My average score has been around 23/25. I got a new gun a few months ago, a remington 887, and i have been doing awful. The past few time I shot trap I shot and average of 10/25. Here is where it gets tricky. I only miss straight aways, I can always hit the hard left and right shots. Also when i hunt or shoot sporting clays I do just fine, but when the 887 and trap get together, nothing good happens. I relize that you need to see me shoot, but any help is appreciated.

  • #2
    First off its going to take some time to get fully adjusted to a new gun. That being said going from 92% to 40% isn't just because your using a new gun. Especially if your only going from one field grade gun to another. It's all in your head! You have already made up your mind that when that straight away comes out of the house your going to miss. I would bet you are lifting your head to watch the target break if your having a problem with straight aways. Also, nothing is going to make you a better shooter than practice but if your going to stick with trap shooting I would suggest an entry level trap gun. BT-99 is a good gun for the money.

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    • #3
      Skeet/trap, is very mental. Like Ncarl said, if you miss one shot a lot of times you'll miss another easy shot. Just take your time after a miss, clear your head and stay positive! Also, you could always shoot your shotgun at some paper, and see if it's shooting straight.

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      • #4
        The level of the comb on the 887 may be different than on the 870 try and make sure you get it right in the pocket and get your head all the way down onto the stock. The 887 may also be lighter and recoil a little more that may cause you to not get your head on the stock

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        • #5
          I figured it was mostly a mental thing. I shot again today and noticed i was keeping my bead on the target, blotting it out, so i was going over. That took care of most of the straight aways. I am really in trap just for practice upland hunting, so if i can't fix this problem, I am going back to the wingmaster. Funny thing though, seems everybody has been doing bad. Everybody was missing the straightaways the other day, and we didn't notice it was a common problem until after practice.

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          • #6
            Missing is like a disease among inexperienced younger shooters. I find that the shooters on high school or FFA shooters are so egotistical that they only wory about beating their teammates. Dont fall victum to that trap! When this happens one guy will miss a target and everyone down the line will se it as an opportunity to gain a bird. This phycs them out and due to their inexperience they end up missing. I became a much better shooter when I stopped trying to prove myself every time I went out there. Instead I just worry about breaking the next target. This is the best advice I can give to a young shooter without actually seeing him shoot.

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            • #7
              When I switched from a 1100/waterfowl & Ithacasxs/uplands to just a Browning Citori for both, I stunk up every range/station I shot at. I thought at the time I was a modestly decent shot,so this missing business shook me up.I wanted to ditch my new gun. A excellent club shooter showed me what I was doing wrong and why I was murdering air. He also showed me that the Browning didn't fit me well. After a little tweaking, I started hitting a bit which lead to hitting a lot. It was mental with fitting and improper technique problems thrown in, though not in that order.

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              • #8
                I used to shoot competitively as a young man, and though its been a good 10 years since I have shot on a regular basis, I would have to say its a mental game. Though as Ithaca said it may have a base in the fit of the gun and improper technique. Fit is easy to fix, technique improves with practice, the hardest part to fix will be the is the mental part. An old trick I used to use is to shoot a fun round left handed, I'm a righty, it is by no means easy and it will bring with it a focus that helped me immensely, besides being able to shoot ambidextrously does have a few advantages.

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