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so its about that time where im looking at a new rifle, and something in .25 caliber is where im kinda heading. something small

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  • #16
    I have two in 257 caliber, a Weatherby and a Remington in 257 Roberts. Ammo for the Weatherby is muy $$ for loaded or brass. And it does clear out the weeds for about 25-50 yards from the shooting bench. The Roberts is fairly inexpensive to load for although ready-loaded ammo is not what you would call cheap. These days I much prefer the little Roberts round. It is polite and efficient.

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    • #17
      I do not not like the 257 weatherby I would go with a 25-06 or 25-06AI or 257 Rob AI. My reasons for not likeing the 257 weatherby have nothing to do with the ballistics or accuracy potential. The reason I am not a fan is the cost to shoot one. Ol Roy cornered the market with his double radius shoulder and brass, ammo, and components are expensive because it has Roy's name. But if the cost of shooting one doesn't bother you then go for it.

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      • #18
        25-06 is what I would prefer you will get a longer barrel life out of 25-06 compared to 257

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        • #19
          25-06 is what I would prefer you will get a longer barrel life out of 25-06 compared to 257.

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          • #20
            As you probably know, I shoot a lot of 25-06 and have been exceptionally happy with that cartridge since 1967. It is very accurate and extremely versatile. It shoots the 75g bullets without excessive barrel wear at 3750 fps, 87/90g at 3600. I use 100g for deer at 3350 fps (I can get them going 3500 fps but my bestA accuaracy comes at around 3350 exept in the Weatherbys with their long free bore where higher speeds around 3500 seem to be most accurate). The 100g bullets deck deer out to 500 yards and an elk won't stop a good 120g bullet (although a .300 Win gives you a couple hundred yards greater range).

            90% of the time I shoot the 75g bullets as they have extremely light recoil (similar to a .243 shooting a 58g bullet).

            I chambered one of my barrels in 25-06 Improved and really love that cartridge as it performs very similar to the .257 Wby at a much lower ammo cost. I now shoot straight 25-06 though because it uses even less powder and like Happy says, you don't have to fire form the cases.

            The .257 Wby is the ultimate if you have enough money for ammo and new barrels or if you don't shoot it much. The Wby requires about 8-10g more powder to push a bullet at 25-06 speed but can go 100-200 fps faster in most bullet weights. Of course that speed is as much attributable to the long free bore as powder charge which in turn negatively affects accuracy. I have found the 25-06 Rem in general to be the most accurate of these and it is fast enough to give me everything I need in the field and it supercedes them in a p-dog town because of the accuracy. The Sako you mentioned just may put 75g bullets throught the same hole at 100 yards if the barrel is good.

            I do notice that when shooting very fast running game, the 25-06 Imp and .257 Wby really do hit right where the cross hairs are at 200 yards. I have to lead an 60 mph antelope by about an inch more with the straight 25-06 Rem if he is crossing flat out at 200 yards.

            I have gravitated to shooting the 25-06 because it performs accurately and economically. Cases are easy to obtain or make. Although I don't shoot factory ammo, it is available on store shelves across America and if you ever have to borrow ammo on a hunt, one of your buddies is more likely to have 25-06 Rem. I even shoot a Weatherby Mark V in 25-06 rather than having chambered it in .257 Wby. In that rifle, I get 3900 fps with 75g bullets and 3500 fps with 100g bullets but the accuracy is not the same as with my Rem 700 Sendero or custom barrels.

            All of the quarter bores mentioned are great rifles for everything from small varmints to deer but I higly recommend the .25-06 Rem unless you really want the fastest rifle on the block.

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            • #21
              i love when dakota spits his knowledge on these rifle posts!!

              thanks to everyone else as well

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              • #22
                Thanks scratch! I always enjoy your comments too! We all form opinions about tactics and products over the years and it's always good to hear from the vast experience of others. I also like to help others interested in these sports so they might avoid some of the many mistakes I've made or take advantage of some of the things I've discovered along the way. That is why I hang around this forum. Your valuable input has taught me a lot.

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                • #23
                  AAM, you can fire form .257 Wby brass out of 7mm Rem Mag brass for a lot less money. Just smash one in your resizing die and load up 3/4 teaspoon of Herco; fill it with creamed wheat and a wad of toilet paper to hold the contents. Point the rifle to the sky and pull the trigger and you have a .257 Wby with radiused shoulders and all. Or from a foot away, you can send that creamed wheat through a six inch fence post; makes a nice 1/4 inch hole clear through.

                  I get my once-fired 7mm Rem Mag brass on gunbroker dot com for around $.30 each. This is a nice way to stock up hundreds of them for practice. Unfortunately, with the Roy, your barrel might be gone by the time you get comfortable with it unless you load down to 25-06 speeds. Spending $50-$90 for a box of ammo does protect that barrel though. Most of us would hit bankruptcy before burning out the barrel.

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                  • #24
                    DakotaMan,
                    You are a fountain of information. I did not know that you can fire form .257 Weatherby brass from 7mm Rem mad. You learn something new every day. Is there a case that I can fire form .240 Weatherby from?

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                    • #25
                      Safado... I haven't researched it but I have never made a .240 Wby out of anything else and don't know of anything to try. My best to you though and glad to convey a little info.

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                      • #26
                        The reason Weatherby brass is expensive is that it is the highest quality brass made by Norma in Sweden. I have fired countless hot loads during load development and never had a case fail. Primer pockets got loose after a dozen firings or so with hot loads, but no cracked cases. Can't say that about Federal, Winchooter, or Remington brass in general. IMO, you get what you pay for!

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                        • #27
                          WAM, I like the Wby brass too but have no problem using the Federal, Win, Rem brass. Those of us who shoot the 25-06, 30-06, 7mm Rem, .300 Win and other such mundane cartridges are accustomed to using such inferior products.

                          I neck size to improve accuracy and to avoid insipient head separation that commonly occurs with belted magnums that head space on that belt. I don't count the reloadings on each case but know I get at least a dozen reloads if not two dozen out of each case.

                          I don't mind seeing a cracked neck every once in a while. I just throw them away when that occurs. I do aneal cases and turn the necks every five shots or so. As a result, I don't see many cracked cases.

                          I never want to see a head separation though since it could jam the chamber in a critical hunting situation. I inspect all belted cases for oncoming head separation above the belt. I can see it coming several loads before its occurance and I simply discard the cases. You can easily see a light colored brass ring forming above the belt as an indication that the case is weakening.

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