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HEY Dakotaman, or anyone else that has custom rifles or aftermarket stocks, what kind of stock do you have on your Dakota?

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  • HEY Dakotaman, or anyone else that has custom rifles or aftermarket stocks, what kind of stock do you have on your Dakota?

    HEY Dakotaman, or anyone else that has custom rifles or aftermarket stocks, what kind of stock do you have on your Dakota?

  • #2
    I stocked 2 Remington 600 Mohawks back in the 70's and they came out nice. One I stocked with a Bishop full length Manlicher stock and the other I stocked with a 3A fancy walnut Fagen rollover varmiter stock. Both projects came out nice. Unfortunately both rifles passed on in trades.

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    • #3
      Krusty,
      Have gone several ways on this question , so far they have all worked. Years ago, used a Bishop stock on a Springfield 06, it still shoots fine. My most accurate rifle, the expert gunsmith dropped the customized action, jewel trigger, and Shilen barrel into a McMillan (sp.?) stock and it has been my "go to" rifle for two barrels, a 300 Win Mag, by the way. Most of my custom rifles, which number quite a few, I am involved with the selection of the stock blank, or have already purchased one at a show via a reputable dealer. Then after discussions as to checkering and style turn the stock maker loose on his own.
      If you have a specific question will try to get an answer. Kindest Regards



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      • #4
        Krusty,
        I have an American walnut stock that I whittled myself from a block of kiln-dried wood in 1969. The barrel is free floated with a good glass/pillar bedding job that holds the receiver. The barrelled action only touches the glass bedding. If the stock were to warp, it would not affect the performance unless it warped so badly that it touched the barrel. This has never happened to me in over 40 years of shooting.

        That rifle is on its fourth barrel and has over 40,000 rounds through it in some of the most adverse hunting conditions in America (rain, snow, sleet, mud, dust, dirt, sand, bouncing out of trees and down canyons, -40 to 115 degree temps, etc.). There is a picture of it on my profile and in my avatar. I like the straight comb for recoil reduction and thumbhole for comfortable and accurate long range shooting. It has always shot well holding a barrel producing .1 MOA groups at 100 yards. So far my best at 1000 yards is a five-shot 3.5 inch group but if I were a better shot, I think it would do better. It hasn't been beaten by an $800-$1500 stock yet and I can say that I have see some of those owners sadly dissappointed.

        My gunsmith is building lots of inexpensive but fine shooting rifles with the Bell & Carlson tactical stocks and I have an H-S Precision composite tactical stock on my Rem 700 Sendero. Any of these aluminum-frame bedded stocks require skim bedding to obtain their best accuracy since the aluminum bedding does not fit your unique and whole receiver as well as glass bedding will. They do save you from having to pillar bed though.

        You can use a wood or composite stock as long as it has a good bedding job with steel/aluminum pillar or frame and a free floated barrel. The aluminum/steel allows you to crank your stock screws down tight to hold the action consistently in the stock without ever torquing it in any way for a dependable stress relieved bedding.

        You will find a variety of stocks on stockysstocks dot com and similar sites that will serve you well as long as you bed them properly. I personally believe that you could shoot competitively with a stock made out of a pine 2x4 as long as it was properly bedded but I haven't tried that yet. I actually put this walnut stock on my custom .300 Dakota to prove the point that you don't need an expensive composite stock for world class rifle shooting.

        I recommend getting a stock you like for a price you can afford and get it properly bedded. Match the contour of the stock to the style of shooting you will do for maximum enjoyment. Get one you like to look at and you should be fine. You can pay $1000 for a stock or $200 for a stock but the cost is not too likely to affect your precision. Bedding is the secret sauce.

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        • #5
          Dakota,
          All well put comments. Bedding is paramount.

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          • #6
            Thanks Happy! As always, my best to you! I was focusing on utilitarian accuracy. Getting a beautiful stock with outstanding grain, shape, character and fine checkering can cost real money. In my opinion, that is money well spent. It makes a rifle a thing of beauty rather than just a tool. I encourage anyone to get as much beauty in their rifle as they can afford and with good bedding, it can be made accurate.

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            • #7
              I did forgo the checkering on the two stocks that I did and they looked pretty good. I decided that you don't have to have checkering on a gun for it to look nice. The rosewood forend and gripcap on the Fagen set it off nicely and the steel forend on the Bishop made a nice compliment to it also.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the great comments gentleman. My 300 Win is turning into my project rifle. I replaced the trigger with a Timmney, and I feel (now felt) like the stock was the next thing to upgrade. It's wearing a CDL stock on it right now that I like because of it's classic lines, and I love the traditional look. I was under the impression that if I were to drill a groundhog at 1000k this year, I was going to need to get a McMillan, or Manners stock to get the most accuracy out of the rifle. This just shows my ignorance. After Dakotamans comments, and Happys, and Sarge commenting on fine wood too, I think I'm going to keep the CDL stock I have on it now and get it glass, and pillar bedded. I'll take the extra $$$ and get me a 6x20 Leupold to top it off.
                Sarge, if I ever get me a 9.3x62 I want a Mannlicher stock on it. They look so dang good!

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                • #9
                  Happy,
                  Where do you go to get a good blank, and what type of wood do you prefer?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Krusty, your CDL stock won't be an issue for you. To plink a groundhog at 1000 yards, you need:
                    1. A premium barrel with perfectly aligned chamber (you don't find too many of these on over-the-counter rifles). This accounts for 90% of the success.
                    2. Bullets (accurate VLD bullets tuned to your rifle; start with Bergers).
                    3. Bedding (above)
                    4. Low paralax scope (you will like the Leupold VX3 6.5-20x40 or better; it doesn't have to be new... they have been great for 10 years)
                    5. A groundhog

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                    • #11
                      DakotaMan,
                      What barrel contour do you have on your Dakota?

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                      • #12
                        My custom .284 has a Bell & Carlson mountain rifle stock which I love due to the weight and feel.It was easier to bed tan most stocks I have putssed with but dakota is dead right it is all about floating the barrel and glass bedding the stock. Hell you could use a 2x4 for a stock and if you float the barrel and bed properly the gun will shoot consistently. And for your ground hog idea I really like Krieger barrels my .284 can drive a nail in at 500 yards all day it is just the little matter of wether I can.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Krusty, it is a heavy varmint contour 26" long, stainless steel, 10 twist, weighing 6.5 pounds. It has a muzzle diameter of .855 with a 5/8x24 thread for a 2" three port muzzle brake or muzzle cap. It has an 11 degree target crown.

                          Check the specs on Bigbboy25's .300 Winny (Thumper)... a very nice rifle. He says that it has a 28" barrel but that might include a 2" muzzle brake (which I don't count because the bullet can't be accellerated through the brake).

                          My buddy at the range has the same Lothar Walther barrel as mine on his .300 Winny and shot a 3/4 inch three shot group at 500 yards with Berger 210s. I haven't beat that yet but I did shoot a .700 inch group at 500 meters (542 yards) with the same Bergers in my .300 Dakota.

                          I can carry the rifle over my shoulder just fine for hunting with a total weight of about 12 pounds with scope and all. A heavier barrel would be marginally advantageous for 1000 yard accuracy but it is harder to carry and it can constrain you in some weight class competitions.

                          The 12 pound total rifle weight absorbs a lot of the recoil and helps with accuracy in that regard too. I've carried that weight rifle for 50 years and don't have a problem with it. I have always hated muzzle brakes but since I shoot it so much, the brake really helps at the higher-than-book velocities that I use for long range hunting situations. I don't use the brake for hunting but I sure use it for shooting 100-200 rounds a day at the range.

                          By the way, my stock has a Limbsaver butt pad and I highly recommend that. It is GREAT for shooting comfort! Also, you can bed your stock yourself with a bedding kit from midwayusa or similar site. It takes a couple of hours but it is not difficult or risky. If you make a mistake, you dremmel out the mistake and re-do the epoxy. But that is unlikely to happen if you follow the instructions.

                          Best of luck on your project! Enjoy!

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                          • #14
                            I always liked Micro bed better than Accuglass for some reason , maybe because of the longer time you have to work with it before it sets up. It also works better after it sets up if you have to remove any of it.

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                            • #15
                              I did not want to bang up the nice wood stock on my Weatherby Mark V, so i got a Bell & Carlson carbon fiber reinforced stock and a bedding kit from Brownells. Did the bedding myself.
                              Nothing hard about it and enough material to do more jobs. The finished job still shoots it's 1" group with the first three shots from a fouled barrel usually touching.

                              Comment

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