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Happy Myles do you decrease the powder charge for your solid bullets compared to equal weight softs in your medium to big bore r

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  • Happy Myles do you decrease the powder charge for your solid bullets compared to equal weight softs in your medium to big bore r

    Happy Myles do you decrease the powder charge for your solid bullets compared to equal weight softs in your medium to big bore rifles? A local discussion came up with varied opinions. I request yours. Thanks.

  • #2
    Ishawooa, my guess is he shoots factory ammo.

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    • #3
      Del do you have any idea how the factories load solids? Dave have you ever wondered about this question? One fellow here feels that they might not load them as hot as soft and it might be true. I am neutral as I only know that the manuals show the same charge for either choice. I am aware that with the .470 NE, .458 Lott, and .416 Rem Mag if you load identical charges behind the solids and the softs you know which one you touch off as the solid does offer a noticeable increase in recoil. I actually have not played around with this idea of varying charges since pressures look the same from brass firing either type of bullet. Again all I do with these rifles is create stones from boulders. Somewhat expensive passtime but interesting. Two of the rifles are going somewhere in central Africa this summer with my reloads, unfortunately I will not be shooting them but instead a close friend.

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      • #4
        Ish, I don't load solids in my .375 H&H but have a friend who hunts Africa with his. His favorite load is the same for all bullets. He carries 300 grain Trophy Bonded Bear Claw, 300 grain Nosler Partition and 300 grain Sledge Hammer Solids each with 76 grains of W760. He uses Federal 215 primers and Winchester brass. At 100 yards all go to the same exact point of impact. This is a pretty good line up and I plan to do the same when I get a chance at the dark continent. For now, I am busting rocks and punching holes with you.

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        • #5
          Solids are about the only bullets I have never loaded. Sorry can't help you there.

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          • #6
            Dak and Del thanks for the responses, maybe i am on the right track with identical charges for both bullet types.

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            • #7
              Ishawooa,

              Sorry, did not take my computer home with me over the weekend, so just saw your inquiry.

              The trick is to get the same velocity from both solids and softs which takes some tinkering with a chronograph, and may well mean different powder amounts. Usually, if you get close to the same point of impact. Sure, ballistic coefficients and sectional density come into play, but solids are generally for up close up and personal. I'm thinking 416's and larger. I don't have any data here at the office, but give a caliber and I am sure I have worked with it, and about every bullet there is.

              If you want to make life easier, use Barnes Triple Shock. Most PH's I have run in
              to lately use them on animals up through Cape Buffalo. They really penetrate.

              When hunting dangerous game, keep it as simple as possible. When in a tough spot, You don't want to be thinking, "Gee which pocket do I have that load in?"

              Woodleigh makes great bullets. In fact my 470 is regulated for them.

              Del , you caught me. I do use some Federal factory ammo. They have been good to me in recent years.

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              • #8
                Ishawooa'

                Just reread my previous post and don"t know if it made much sense. Use your chronograph until you find powder charges that will give similar point if impact for both solids and soft points. Bearing surface length comes into play here.

                Ask a specific question and perhaps my feeble mind can grasp it.

                I cannot over emphasize, don't over intellectualize your African battery. It is a mistake many first timers make.













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                • #9
                  Ishawooa,

                  If your friend is planning on elephant. Use solids only, repeat solids only

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                  • #10
                    Happy thanks for the reply. All loads chrony within reasonable tolerances for solids and softs. I selected Woodleighs for the .470 as the Heym is regulated for them. Otherwise the choice is Hornady DGs in the Sako and M-70. Up to 100 yard accuracy is acceptable. Since my friend who has a portable ballistic lab is in Afganistan for at least six more months I have to rely on my own chronograph. We were wondering if the solids create more pressure than the softs given otherwise identical physical configurations.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ishawooa,

                      I've heard the solids create more pressure, but the loads should be well within safety tolerances. Most of his shooting will not be at long range High velocities are over rated in Africa.

                      In South Africa hunting animals like Val Reedbuck or Mt. Reedbuck can be long range and wind, but animals requiring solids will normally be 50 yards give or take a little.

                      The trick is to get them to similar point of impact.

                      When is your friend going? I'll be in Tanzania last two weeks of Sept and first week of Oct. Still trying to get an East African Stitatunga, and will hunt a few other animals as long as I'm there.

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                      • #12
                        Myles, what gun will you be taking after sitatunga? Surely you don't need a .416 for them, and do you bother to bring a stainless gun or at least one you don't mind mucking up in the nasty stuff?

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                        • #13
                          Shane,

                          I'll probably take a 300 Win Mag by Mark Bansner, which is stainless and synthetic. Don't need this much rifle, but it super accurate, and as I stated I will be hunting other animals. Will be hunting the Sitatunga in the western swamps, that is why I'm going so late in the seasons, being hopeful the water is down somewhat. I've hunted the Forest,and the Zambezi successfully, The East African has eluded me, and I have worked hard at it. To me the Forest Sitatunga is the most difficult animal in Africa. However, I've had tough luck with the East African variety. Never seen a male, except for the top of horns in the reeds. To get my Zambezi, I waded through 200 yards of water up to my chin, climbed 20 feet up a tree and shot it at 200 yards. Thought Sitatunga hunting was easy. I'm still working on my last one 30 years later.

                          Will still take my 416 Rigby, they have good buffalo in that area. Also, a White bearded Gnu north of Arusha. Kindest Regards

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                          • #14
                            I did not mean it takes a 416 to kill a Wildebeast(Gnu). Just meant I was going to hunt one will, will use the 300. May take my new 30 06 instead of the 300. However, it has a fancy piece of wood, which as you pointed out, the swamp may be a bit tough on.

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                            • #15
                              Hey, if you decide to shoot a wildebeast with a .416, I won't criticize.

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