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To all you military guys out there: Why do military snipers use 168 gr. bullets in .308 win/ 7.62 NATO / 7.62x51 mm instead of,

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  • Jim
    replied
    The question was 168 grain vs. 150. That's all. Jim in Missouri stuck to the question on the same principle that led to the adoption of the .50 cal for unique sniping applications. We've come a long way since my sniper school/jungle training in Panama (before we deposed Pizza Face).

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  • oldsniper
    replied
    M118 - 173gr FMJBT 7.62 MM @ 2550 FPs was the original sniper ammo, later on circa 1974/5 M852 = military 7.62 brass and loading it with the Sierra 168gr Match King bullet, then in the early 1980s M852 was adopted for match use only. Because the Sierra Match King (SMK) bullet had a hollow tip as a byproduct of production, it was not regarded at the time as being acceptable for combat use in terms of abiding by the Laws of Land Warfare. The M118 was redesignated the M118 ‘Special Ball’, or SB, and was the authorized ammo for combat use by snipers. In the early 1990’s the M852 was approved for combat use, however a new version of the M118, the M118LR was being developed whice used the 175gr Match King.

    The correct answer is time dependent 173, 168 or 175 can all be correct. I retired before the 175 became official but I knew of its development.

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  • Chuck_2
    replied
    They don't use 168gr ammunition. The current standard .308 sniper round is a Sierra 175 grain boat tail open tip bullet. It is not a hollow point. The open tip is the result of part of the manufacturing process. It is loaded by Lake City and can be purchased on the open market as the M118 LR. I shoot them successfully out to 1200 yards. The 168 grain bullet looses its reliability for accurate hits between 700 and 800 yards.

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  • rudyglove27
    replied
    Good answer Jeff4066 and + 1 for you sir!!!

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  • Jim in Mo
    replied
    I'll tell you why velocity isn't that important. Wind, sectional density, ballistic coefficient. Light bullets suck, heavy wins. Military does it right, they know.

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  • evspence
    replied
    ok now that i read your posts you guys are gunna shoot thousands of little .308 holes in that theory, but hey, i probably don't know as much as Clay, so i'll go with him.

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  • evspence
    replied
    thats just the way the come out of the machine without any alterations. simply cost effective.

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  • Big O
    replied
    Sorry Mr. Cooper just passing on "round figures" not facts, though I did a micromiter check on two 168gr.bthp that I've used on deer and they came out almost at .5 in. One was .437 the other was .426, just tryin' to be helpful.

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  • kolbster
    replied
    Hornaday TAP 168 gr BTHP. it the best deer round ever made

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  • bonnier-admin_2
    replied
    007

    Stick with that load!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • bonnier-admin_2
    replied
    Big O

    Better go back and review your source of your info Sir

    Clay Cooper,
    USAF Air Force High Power Team 2nd Generation

    Leave a comment:


  • Big O
    replied
    A couple of the guys have it right, JL it comes down to the ballistic coefficience,velocity,and what was told to me "terminal impact", basicly what the bullet does to the target upon impact. The 168gr.bthp(boat-tail hollow point)increases it's surface impact area by a factor that keeps increasing until unable to respond. Basicly it keeps getting bigger until it can't. So you start with a bullet .308 of an inch across that ends up being a little over .5 of inch across. Like getting hit with the core of a golf ball going 200mph in the head. Hope this helps.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeff Bowers
    replied
    At least during my service, all sniper ammunition was hand loaded at the unit. There was to be no inconsistency or the civilian +- 5%.

    The "default" load also has changed with the weapons/barrels used. As stated, it's a balance of velocity/energy. Remember, not all shots happen at 1000 yards. The trick is to know exactly where the round hits at any range.

    Leave a comment:


  • 007
    replied
    150 grain Hornaday interlocks is all that my .308 ever sees, nothing else is necessary.

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  • bonnier-admin_2
    replied
    If velocity isn't a problem, then why don't they use a heavier bullet like a 250 grain or better yet a 45-70 trap door!

    Ballistic coefficient + maximum velocity (best trajectory without excessive recoil) + accuracy = One Less Bad Guy!

    Leave a comment:

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